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NEWS
By Linda Geeson | August 25, 1991
The food is fine at Phillips, but the highlight of the evening was when the strolling banjo player crooned "Yes, Sir, That's My Baby" to a nearby diner in a high chair. If that doesn't sound like your idea of a good time, you're not ready for Phillips Crab House.The Phillips family opened their original restaurant next door to the 21st Street spot in 1956. They now operate six restaurants -- three in Ocean City -- that consistently rank among the busiest in the country, so obviously they're doing something right.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 18, 2005
August may be the time for folks to go away. This year, it seems it's also the time for some local restaurants to disappear. The popular Owings Mills bistro Due closed recently. However, its food can still be found in its sister restaurant, Linwood's, right next door. One of Linwood's managers, Rachel Zundell, says the Due menu was rolled into that of Linwood's. The Due space is being turned into a catering venue. Linwood's Restaurant, 410-356-3030, is at 25 Crossroads Drive. Lunch is served 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday through Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 20, 2003
A friend recently spoke approvingly of an experience at one of the area's better-known steakhouses. She told me that after she had ordered, the waiter returned to say the potatoes would not be served that evening because they were not up to the chef's standards. When something like that happens once, it's a sign of a caring chef. But when it happens four times in the course of a single meal, it's a sign of problems in the kitchen. That was our experience at the Grille, a restaurant and bar that opened in Canton last November.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp and David Michael Ettlin and Bonnie J. Schupp,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1998
The restaurant seems to have been there forever, but it's really only 61 years since Snyder's Willow Grove opened its doors along Hammonds Ferry Road.Even its name speaks to another era -- and a lost bucolic setting near the banks of the Patapsco.Fast-forward toward the end of the millennium, and you find a large, boxy building on the edge of an exit ramp from a bustling beltway that could just as well house a mail-processing operation or an assembly line.But inside the doors, past the lounge and banquet rooms, you'll find quite another story -- an almost elegant dining room with green and white decor, heavy white tablecloths, and a long, classic menu leaning toward surf and turf options.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 23, 2003
The Valley Inn is weighted down with history. You can almost see the ghosts sitting on the porch watching the dog races or the illegal cockfights. All that ended midway through the last century, of course, but the menu is still filled with dishes from another era: celery stuffed with cream cheese for an appetizer, crab imperial, turkey a la king, wienerschnitzel. Traditional Maryland fare lives on at the Valley Inn. Just take a look at the menus from the '40s posted in the foyer; they aren't that much different from the one you'll be ordering from -- except for the prices, of course.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 11, 2005
FOOD *** ( 3 STARS) SERVICE *** (3 STARS) ATMOSPHERE ** (2 STARS) Let's face it. Haussner's is a hard act to follow. Not so much because of the food. In its last years, I never heard people say the food was why they ate there. But Haussner's was one of the few restaurants that could be legitimately described as a Baltimore landmark. It was wonderfully fun to be sitting at one of the white-clothed tables, even if your fish was overcooked or the famous strawberry pie didn't have much taste.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 28, 2005
Sometimes the big chain restaurants -- the ones with the loud commercials on television and the paste-on-a-smile themes -- remind of a gaudy cubic zirconium ring. They're so bright, with their oversized portions, colorful menus and "Hi, I'm Suzy" service, but they're not the real thing. And then there's Brewers Hill, a small, imperfect diamond among local restaurants. It is a real Baltimore restaurant, not part of a chain, and in its own way it s just right. Given the choice between a giant fake hunk of glitter and a small diamond, I think most of us would choose the diamond.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard | May 7, 1992
Haussner's is always special.This venerable Baltimore restaurant is special for its longevity, its legendary art collection, its wide-ranging menu, its slightly crusty waitresses, its picture-perfect bakery case, its brimming baskets of homemade breads on every table and for its ability to bring patrons -- locals and out-of-towners -- back and back and back.Haussner's is virtually unforgettable. Tourists, I would wager, remember it long after they've left the Inner Harbor. And for area residents, it remains essential Baltimore: comfortable, consistent, friendly -- a nice restaurant, but certainly not pretentious or intimate.
NEWS
By Dawn Fallik and Dawn Fallik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 15, 1998
A good fish place is hard to find, especially one that offers selection and quality in the middle of winter.So it's worth heading for Busch's Chesapeake Inn, tucked on Busch's Frontage Road off U.S. 50 on the way to the Bay Bridge. The only deterrent may be the price, which is a little steep for most post-holiday pockets.The original restaurant was little more than a large shack, measuring 20 feet by 20 feet and without electricity or plumbing when it opened in 1946. The inn, then known as "Busch's Dri-Vin," offered only a few options: hamburgers, hot dogs and crab cakes.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | March 6, 1994
Timbuktu, 1726 Dorsey Road, Hanover, (410) 796-0733. Open Mondays to Saturdays for lunch and dinner, Sundays for dinner only. Major credit cards. No-smoking area: yes. Wheelchair-accessible: yes. Prices: appetizers, $6.95-$7.95; entrees, $8.95-$28.95. No, it's not the town on the southern edge of the Sahara Desert. It's a big, sprawling restaurant near BWI Airport, where the most exotic food on the menu is probably the manicotti.And surely the owners didn't name their restaurant Timbuktu to suggest that it's hard to get to. (According to the menu, the main access to the city in the Republic of Mali is by camel.
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