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Crab Imperial

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NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 11, 2008
Martha Nielson of Trenton, N.J., was hoping someone would have the recipe for a Crab Imperial dish similar to the one she and her husband used to enjoy on their trips to Maryland. It was served at Busch's restaurant in Cape St. Claire. The restaurant closed several years ago and though she has tried many recipes for Crab Imperial, none has come close to the light and fluffy one with a cheesy topping that was served at Busch's. Unfortunately, we did not receive any responses from our readers for a Crab Imperial with a cheese topping.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Patricia Jones of Catonsville was in search of the recipe for the crab imperial that was served at the Garrison Grill, a restaurant located near Walbrook Junction in West Baltimore during the 1950s. No luck tracking down the owner or anyone else who might have the specific recipe from the Garrison Grill, but several readers saw Jones' request and sent in their favorite recipes for crab imperial. Ester Marsiglia of Pikesville sent in a recipe that comes from the "Seafood Cookery" booklet published by Home Services of Baltimore Gas and Electric in the 1950s, and it is an excellent example of a traditional Maryland recipe.
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NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | May 26, 2004
Dennis Bolduc of Winchester, Va., wrote seeking a recipe "for crab imperial like the one served in the Crab Claw Restaurant in St. Michaels." Nancy Lewis of Columbia responded. "Attached is a recipe for crab imperial that was requested by Dennis Bolduc. This recipe was taken from Maryland Seafood Cookbook 2, published by the Seafood Marketing Authority of the Department of Economic and Community Development in Annapolis. ... I have made this recipe many times, and it is delicious." Crab Imperial Serves 8 2 eggs 1/2 cup mayonnaise 2 tablespoons chopped pimento 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 6 to 8 drops liquid hot pepper sauce 1 teaspoon salt 2 pounds Maryland back fin crab meat seafood seasoning (Old Bay)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and Richard Gorelick,Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2009
Kolpers is that roadhouse restaurant you see, and wonder about, whenever you're biking, hiking or driving the back way into Hampden or Woodberry. It turns out that's the backside view of Kolpers, from which it looks like a small-town party palace. Approached from the front, though, Kolpers looks more like a place you'd go for a quiet sit-down dinner. This makes Kolpers a mullet restaurant ("business in the front, party in the back"), and a little bit frustrating, too. There is a bar world here and a dining world, and they feel disconnected, although they don't have to be. The bar, even early on a weeknight, feels like a friendly hangout for regulars, with folks around the bar enjoying light fare - quesadillas, burgers and ribs.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
A silver candelabrum decorates the table. The chef drops live lobster into a steaming pot. Bearnaise sauce is warming - a tasty accompaniment for the filet mignon about to be flame-broiled. Exquisite. Scrumptious. Refined. And certainly not bad for parking-lot fare. Stand up and give a cheer for the world of big-time football tailgating, where pigskin fans and sometime gourmet chefs mix it up to see who can make the most memorable meal. Call it the punt, pass and poach competition. For 10 days each fall - more if the team earns home-field advantage in the playoffs - the asphalt-covered spaces outside the Baltimore Ravens' PSINet Stadium are home to a gastronomic tour de force.
NEWS
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | July 18, 1993
THE LANDINGWhere: 123rd Street, bay side, (410) 250-0400Hours: Dinner served 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. dailyCredit cards: Accepts all major credit cardsWe had misgivings about the Landing when we walked into the restaurant. It was crowded with families, toddlers and squirming infants in the dining room, and we braced ourselves for a noisy and hurried meal.We needn't have been alarmed. Our visit turned out to be pleasant and relaxing.The restaurant staff expertly manages diners -- big and small -- and the room configuration divides the dining area into small sections that provide some privacy.
FEATURES
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,The Evening SunThe Sun The Sunday Sun | January 19, 1991
Russell's Ltd., 1600 Frederick Road, 744-6315. The building that houses Russell's in Catonsville has had nearly as many lives as the proverbial cat, beginning as a horse-car waiting room in the 1860s and winding up as a disco before becoming a semi-suburban, semi-country restaurant. The superb service was not matched by the food, which was inconsistent and a bit too high priced for the surroundings. The Broiled Flounder stuffed with Crab Imperial ($17.95) was outstanding and the dinner's obvious high point.
SPORTS
By Bob Pickering | April 10, 1999
Today: An Argentine-bred mare raced exclusively in New York will be the likely choice over four locally raced geldings in the $100,000 John B. Campbell Handicap.Carta de Amor, riding a four-race winning streak at Aqueduct, will make a rare appearance away from the Big Apple while assuming the role of favorite in the 44th running.Trained by Juan Serey and owned by John Rotella, Carta de Amor beat five male opponents in the Gray Lag Handicap while carrying 113 pounds over a muddy strip.She'll be accompanied by regular rider Vladimir Diaz for the 1 3/16-mile event and pick up two pounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 13, 1994
Not many places are prettier this time of year than Ladew, near Monkton, one of the country's best-known topiary gardens. The good news is that the food at the Cafe at Ladew Gardens, recently taken over by Jane Fallon Caterers, is worthy of the surroundings.I'm not talking about the immediate surroundings. The cafe is located in what once must have been Harvey Smith Ladew's stables. They've been converted into a pleasant eating space with a low, whitewashed beamed ceiling and stone floor.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
I thought I had beheld every panaromic view of the bay. Then I discovered the Hobbit.The restaurant affords a sweeping view of the water and adjacent wetlands from its spacious dining room. Visitors are given the illusion of seclusion. But you'll soon realize you're sharing this view with dozens of other diners.We had heard wonderful things about the Hobbit, particularly about the rich sauces that accentuate the seafood and other dishes.Ever money-conscious, we arrived early to take advantage of at least one of the restaurant's early-bird specials (to complement, of course, a regular-priced dinner entree)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 20, 2008
My rule of thumb in ordering at the new Riptide by the Bay in Fells Point is this: If it goes with beer, go for it. That means, for instance, you will be perfectly happy with the steamed crabs. They are homegrown, cooked to order with a seasoning mix that involves a lot of Old Bay but also some other ingredients like extra red pepper. Ours were meaty and not waterlogged. Come to think of it, Riptide may be Fells Point's only crab house. Obrycki's and Mo's are nearby, but they aren't in Fells Point proper.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Sun | June 11, 2008
Martha Nielson of Trenton, N.J., was hoping someone would have the recipe for a Crab Imperial dish similar to the one she and her husband used to enjoy on their trips to Maryland. It was served at Busch's restaurant in Cape St. Claire. The restaurant closed several years ago and though she has tried many recipes for Crab Imperial, none has come close to the light and fluffy one with a cheesy topping that was served at Busch's. Unfortunately, we did not receive any responses from our readers for a Crab Imperial with a cheese topping.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
Mary Ann Hofmeister, a homemaker who enjoyed gardening, died of renal failure July 26 at Brighton Gardens in Towson. The former Lutherville resident was 87. Born Mary Ann Costen in Princess Anne, she attended Somerset County schools. She moved to Baltimore in the late 1930s and met her future husband, Charles Albert Hofmeister, a Bethlehem Steel metallurgical engineer. They married in 1942 and lived in Sparrows Point until moving to Lutherville in 1955. She retired to Salisbury in the l980s and lived there until this year, when she and her husband moved to Towson.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 10, 2007
Food ** 1/2 (2 1/2 STARS) Service *** (3 STARS) Atmosphere *** (3 STARS) The Crackpot in Bel Air, a sibling to the Baltimore institution of the same name, looks like it belongs in a marina. You expect to see the water from the windows. Of course, what you actually see is a parking lot and a Target, but the illusion is good. When the owners of the original Crackpot decided to expand after 28 years, they spared no expense. This is a crab house deluxe, with two kitchens, an interior waterfall and fishpond, and its own seafood market.
NEWS
February 21, 2007
You walk up to the display case, where you examine all sorts of fresh fish and seafood. You make your pick. You choose how you'd like it cooked - broiled, fried or grilled - and, perhaps, what kind of sauce you'd like with it. You choose two side dishes. Ten minutes later, your meal is delivered to you. Are you at one of Baltimore's finest seafood restaurants? You could be. But you could also be at Parkville's newest seafood place, Conrad's Crabs & Seafood Market. Obviously, not your usual seafood market.
NEWS
By SLOANE BROWN | July 19, 2006
If you've driven around Padonia and York roads lately, you may have noticed a new face on the corner. Rib 'N Reef has taken the spot vacated last November by Gibby's. John Bartsocas, who bought the space with his nephews George Tragas and Pete Vavaroutsosos, says while you won't find steamed crabs on the menu, there's plenty of other seafood to choose from. And then some. The menu is extensive. Let's start with the appetizers. They include crab imperial ($11.95); ahi tuna wrapped in nori and panko, flash-fried and served with a warm sake dipping sauce ($9.95)
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | March 30, 1995
Eldridge Milton Walker, whose catering firm was known for its lavish repasts that featured such Tidewater area gourmet specialties as Diamondback Terrapin and crab imperial, died Sunday from complications of diabetes at Union Memorial Hospital.The Northeast Baltimore resident was 66.For more than three decades until retiring and closing the business in 1991, he operated Gorsuch Caterers, whose slogan was, "For Fine Foods and Service that makes yours the Special Occasion."Mr. Walker was a familiar figure at area social gatherings, ranging from political fund-raisers to North Baltimore debutante parties and private dinners.
NEWS
August 3, 2007
Mary Ann Hofmeister, a homemaker who enjoyed gardening, died of renal failure July 26 at Brighton Gardens in Towson. The former Lutherville resident was 87. Born Mary Ann Costen in Princess Anne, she attended Somerset County schools. She moved to Baltimore in the late 1930s and met her future husband, Charles Albert Hofmeister, a Bethlehem Steel metallurgical engineer. They married in 1942 and lived in Sparrows Point until moving to Lutherville in 1955. She retired to Salisbury in the l980s and lived there until this year, when she and her husband moved to Towson.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | December 11, 2005
FOOD *** ( 3 STARS) SERVICE *** (3 STARS) ATMOSPHERE ** (2 STARS) Let's face it. Haussner's is a hard act to follow. Not so much because of the food. In its last years, I never heard people say the food was why they ate there. But Haussner's was one of the few restaurants that could be legitimately described as a Baltimore landmark. It was wonderfully fun to be sitting at one of the white-clothed tables, even if your fish was overcooked or the famous strawberry pie didn't have much taste.
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