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NEWS
June 3, 2013
Abandoned crab pots can be a serious issue in the Chesapeake Bay. As long as there is bait in them they will continue to catch crabs. A dead crab in an abandoned pot becomes bait. But a recent article in The Sun refers to crab pots and crab traps interchangeably, and they are not the same thing ("Building a better crab trap," May 30). Traps are used primarily by recreational crabbers. It is a square trap made of wire such as chicken wire with bait such as salted eel tied inside. When it lands on the bottom the four sides are open.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 8, 2014
An overwhelming majority of Marylanders are worried about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, a new poll finds, and most are concerned enough about the bay's slumping crabs to back a moratorium on crabbing. The survey by Goucher College found 84 percent of those contacted last week said they were very or somewhat concerned about bay pollution. Just 14 percent said it worried them little or not at all. The 708 Marylanders interviewed by telephone were only a little more upbeat about the overall health of the state's environment - 62 percent rated it fair to poor, while 36 percent consider it good to excellent.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2013
For years, environmentalists and watermen have been searching for a way to deal with the Chesapeake Bay's "ghost pots" - derelict crab traps that are too deep to retrieve and too problematic to co-exist with marine life. Though the traps have been abandoned, they continue to ensnare and kill crabs. Now two Anne Arundel County high school seniors have developed a possible solution: a trap held together with zinc rings that decay, making abandoned traps fall apart at the bottom of the bay. "Leave it kids to find a great solution for a serious problem," said Tony Friedrich, executive director of the Coastal Conservation Association of Maryland.
FEATURES
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
At The Arthouse in Hampden, Chef Jordi Miller uses simple ingredients to create pizzas and pastas that are fresh, creative and delicious. Here, she makes the most of Maryland crabmeat and asparagus, combining them with fresh pappardelle and a mustardy cream sauce. Instead of making your own pasta, you can substitute your favorite store-bought brand. But for adventurous home cooks, the paper-thin pappardelle will require a pasta roller. “Cheap ones start at around $20 and will suit your purposes,” says Miller.
NEWS
August 24, 2011
I just read Stephen B. Awalt's reply to your article about "designer" crab feasts and laughed all the way through ("Simplicity is special," Aug. 21). I just can't imagine anyone having a crab feast with the items mentioned and in the way it was described. I worked my way through every action Mr. Awalt wrote about, and they were so real that every crab-eating Marylander probably has experienced them at one time or another. The most hilarious thing would be for someone to read the designer crab feast article to people in the middle of enjoying a crab feast, then tell them that's how they're going to do it next year.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2011
The world's first mass-produced, certified gluten-free crab cake? At least a Maryland company is making it. Bread crumbs used in typical crab cakes contain gluten, a type of protein found in wheat, barley or rye that many people — potentially millions worldwide — have trouble digesting. So Salisbury-based Handy International Corp., which has been in business since 1903, found a way around the problem. After months of testing recipes, the seafood company crafted a version with crumbs made with rice flour.
NEWS
July 19, 2010
Perhaps no other Maryland business is as dependent on seasonal guest workers as the crab processing industry. Hundreds of people come into the country each year, most from Mexico, to pick crabmeat from the shell at fewer than two dozen plants scattered around the Chesapeake Bay. This dependency on the H-2B visa program has always been controversial. And crab processors found themselves back in the spotlight last week after the release of a report alleging guest workers have been ill-treated with incidents of harassment, low wages, and substandard housing.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | September 2, 2012
Eat Maryland crab meat and win a prize. Throughout September, diners who eat at restaurants participating in Maryland's True Blue program can win a pair of tickets to the Mermaid's Kiss Oyster Fest, an after-hours celebration of Maryland seafood on Oct. 3 at the National Aquarium in Baltimore . Launched this spring by the Maryland Department of Natural Resources, the True Blue program allows restaurants serving DNR-verified Maryland blue...
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 16, 1997
MIAMI -- Big government is making a new attempt to impose itself as Big Brother or, in the case of a local restaurant, Big Sister.The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission was informed that Joe's Stone Crab restaurant, an 84-year-old family-owned Miami institution with 250 employees, had not hired any female ''waitpersons'' in four years.Without a formal complaint by any individual alleging discrimination, the EEOC used Census data to persuade U.S. District Judge Court Daniel Hurley that a state of discrimination against women exists at Joe's.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | August 21, 2014
Angus Phillips, an inveterate Annapolis-area crabber, joined my call for a moratorium on the harvest of blue crabs from the Chesapeake Bay. "The time has come," he wrote in The Washington Post last month, "to stop pussyfooting around and shut down crabbing for a few years, to give the delectable crustaceans a chance to recover the way geese, yellow perch and rockfish did. " Phillips wrote about fishing and hunting for 30-plus years at The Post...
NEWS
August 8, 2014
It's seafood time, dear readers! Enjoy the 33rd Havre de Grace Seafood Festival in Tydings Park, today through Sunday, (Aug. 8-10) Friday 3 to 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sample seafood delicacies from near and far, while enjoying live entertainment, artisans and crafters. Welcome to 3 Dog Night, live in concert, tonight, Aug. 8. Phone 410-939-1525 for more information or visit http://www.hdgseafoodfestival.org . The American Legion Post 47 will sponsor second and third Saturdays (of the month)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
  Governor Martin O'Malley, on behalf of Chesapeake Bay watermen and the True Blue program that promotes Maryland Blue Crab sustainability, accepted a donation of $10,270 from Flying Dog Brewery and Old Bay on Wednesday at the beer company's Frederick taproom.  The money, according to Flying Dog director of communications Erin Weston, comes from a portion of proceeds from sales of the Flying Dog Dead Rise beer, which is a collaboration with...
FEATURES
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
You get a crab, and you get a crab, and you get a crab! Everybody here gets a crab!  Oprah's in town. The billionaire media magnate, whose career took off after a stint as an anchor on WJZ in Baltimore, came back to the city Wednesday for a dinner of crabs and crab cakes in a private dining area of Captain James Landing in Canton, according to the restaurant's owner Bill Tserkis. Oprah posted a picture on Instagram with her partner, Stedman Graham, smiling and holding up crabs.
TRAVEL
By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Move over Aunt Becky. Uncle Jesse found "true love" in Ocean City this weekend. John Stamos, who played the lovable goofball uncle to the infant Olsen twins in "Full House" and is promoting his new rom-com, "My Man is a Loser," posted a picture of a mountain of hard-shell crabs to Instagram on Sunday. The caption: "Found true love in Ocean City MD. " Stamos, who also plays guitar and drums, was in the area performing with The Beach Boys. The band played in New Jersey on Saturday night and Delaware on Sunday, and has shows in Lancaster, Pa., on Monday and Columbus, Ohio, on Tuesday, according to its website.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski joined with Virginia lawmakers on Friday in requesting the Obama administration step up enforcement of seafood processors that are fraudulently labeling imported crab meat as a product of the Chesapeake Bay. In a letter to President Barack Obama, Mikulski asked that deceptive labeling be included as a focus of a task force created by the White House in June to address illegal fishing. The Maryland Democrat also requested a briefing on the issue from federal agencies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
Spike Gjerde, executive chef and co-owner of Woodberry Kitchen, shows America how to make a soft-shell crab sandwich. He also tells America that no one in Baltimore refers to it as a soft-shell crab sandwich. Apparently, we all say "soft-crab sandwich. " I don't know about that. But I do know that Woodberry Kitchen 's soft-shell crab sandwich uses white bread, so it's automatically great. Spike's recipe for soft-shell crabs appears in the May issue of Esquire magazine, as part of its "Eat Like a Man" series.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Don't let it be said that Baltimore isn't at the forefront of the environmental protection movement.  According to "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart," Charm City is almost single-handedly helping to save a certain species from extinction.  Unfortunately, it isn't the polar bear. It's the, ahem, crab. And, no, not that crab.         Thanks to Brazilian waxes and similar trends, the ecosystem of pubic lice is endangered, the show's Jessica Williams reports.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
"Fish on!" called P.J. Klavon, as he reached for a trap hauled from the placid waters of the Tred Avon River. Inside the black metal cage wriggled a single white perch, a safe distance from a blue crab. The fish weren't exactly jumping last week into the Bay Commitment, a 41-foot research vessel owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. After a morning's work collecting more than 100 traps set in the river the day before, the vessel's crew had seen barely a half-bushel of crabs, fewer than two dozen fish and a single eel. Klavon, a lieutenant junior grade in NOAA's uniformed service, didn't have many opportunities to sing out. Fortunately for these trappers, they were fishing for science, not a living.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 26, 2014
Scientists are predicting that the Chesapeake Bay's oxygen-starved "dead zone" will be slightly larger than average this summer. Using computer modeling underwritten by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration , researchers forecast that by next month, nearly 2 cubic miles of bay water will have inadequate oxygen dissolved in it for fish and crabs to thrive. That's roughly 12 percent of the water in the bay and its river tributaries, according to Caroline Wicks of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science . If it follows the normal pattern, the dead zone will grow and intensify until mid-July, then slowly shrink.
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