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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
John G. Schisler, the longtime spokesman and director of public relations for the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., died Sept. 12 at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. He was 85. "Through and through, it was C&P and what was best for the community," said Betsy Nelson, who retired in 2012 as president of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers. "He was diligent and a pragmatist, but had a heart of gold. " The son of J. Harry Schisler, executive vice president of the Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, and Mildred Hawkins Schisler, a homemaker, John Gardner Schisler was born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2014
John G. Schisler, the longtime spokesman and director of public relations for the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., died Sept. 12 at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. He was 85. "Through and through, it was C&P and what was best for the community," said Betsy Nelson, who retired in 2012 as president of the Association of Baltimore Area Grantmakers. "He was diligent and a pragmatist, but had a heart of gold. " The son of J. Harry Schisler, executive vice president of the Fidelity & Deposit Co. of Maryland, and Mildred Hawkins Schisler, a homemaker, John Gardner Schisler was born in Baltimore and raised in Cedarcroft.
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BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | December 4, 1990
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. has asked the Public Service Commission to reconsider last month's decision that requires C&P to offer free blocking to anyone in Maryland who wants to prevent his number from being detected by the Caller ID device.The commission's conclusion "ignores Caller ID's proven benefits and the impact that blocking would have, not only on Caller ID subscribers, but on customers in general," C&P said in a Nov. 30 filing submitted to the PSC.C&P accused the commission of "relying on facts not in evidence" in arriving at its Nov. 20 decision, which was reached after a nearly yearlong review by legislators, regulators and consumer groups in Maryland.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Henry B. Mann Jr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. marketing manager and World War II veteran, died Aug. 4 of complications from dementia at Envoy of Denton, a nursing home. He was 93. The son of Henry B. Mann Sr., an attorney, and Amelia R. Mann, a homemaker, Henry Bond Mann Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Evergreen Avenue in Hamilton. After graduating in 1938 from Polytechnic Institute, Mr. Mann began working for C&P Telephone. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army and served with Company B, 53rd Signal Battalion in Europe.
NEWS
By Leslie Cauley | September 25, 1990
Gasoline prices may be going up, but basic phone rates for consumers won't be for at least two years, thanks to a controversial measure approved yesterday by Maryland's Public Service Commission.Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. agreed to freeze rates in exchange for freedom to continue to set prices for competitive services -- and keep all the profit. The plan goes into effect Monday.For Baltimoreans and residents of neighboring counties, that means the current, basic monthly phone rate, $16.15, won't be edging up even a penny until at least 1992.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. of Maryland yesterday asked the Public Service Commission to reconsider its order directing C&P to cut its rates by $28.6 million.The company argued that the PSC ordered it to accept a rate of profit that was too low and that too much of the earnings from its Yellow Pages operation were being included in its profit cap."It really takes away any incentive we might have to modernize the network and improve efficiency, David Pacholczyk, a C&P spokesman, said.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley | August 21, 1991
Among the upwardly mobile executive ranks of Bell Atlantic Corp., J. Henry "Hank" Butta remains an anomaly: He has commuted from the same house for 18 years, he vacations in Ocean City, and his idea of fun is to go crabbing in the Wye River using chicken necks for bait.And when this man of decidedly simple tastes retires Sept. 1 from Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co., the local phone company that is owned by Bell Atlantic, he will leave as one of the most influential executives in Maryland and, arguably, one of the most effective managers in Bell Atlantic's stable of talent.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | June 23, 1992
Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. could save itself -- and consumers -- millions of dollars by tightening up its business, according to a new report for the Public Service Commission.And regulators should keep a close eye on C&P's corporate books to make sure charges for related businesses -- which today number in the dozens -- aren't being unfairly passed along to Maryland consumers, the report says.Those conclusions are contained in a lengthy report on C&P and the regulated and unregulated businesses of its corporate parent, Bell Atlantic Corp.
BUSINESS
By Leslie Cauley and Leslie Cauley,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
Customers of Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. in Washington now have the option -- the luxury -- of making appointments for phone repairs and installations, ending the anguish of waiting for workers to show up sometime between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.Under the new "When Do You Want It?" campaign, residential customers can make appointments for weekdays, evenings and on weekends.But C&P's Baltimore customers need not bother answering the question "When Do You Want It?"Under its month-old customer service policy, C&P of Maryland can offer an approximate time -- within two hours -- when service or repair personnel might show up. But that's it."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Colonial Players' season opener of Agatha Christie's "The Unexpected Guest" begins with several minutes of suspenseful darkness, before a stranger enters the unlit house and shines his flashlight on a woman holding a gun. The stage lights brighten to reveal the woman's dead husband, and the players are off to another exciting season. Director Richard Atha-Nicholls also kept his cast in the dark, in a sense, as he did not allow the performers to read the end of the play until just two weeks before opening night.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2014
Lloyd G. Shackelford, a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. worker and a longtime Lutherville resident, died April 30 of complications from cancer at the Colorado State Veterans Home in Walsenburg. He was 94. The son of Lloyd Russell Shackelford, a building contractor, and Anna Guseman Shackelford, a homemaker, Lloyd Gay Shackelford was born and raised in Grafton, W.Va., where he graduated in 1937 from Grafton High School. Mr. Shackelford was an accomplished draftsman, but the Depression put an end to his dream of studying architecture.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | October 10, 2012
While Baltimore's air is healthier to breathe than it used to be, at least one environmental group thinks it could be cleaner still.  The Sierra Club released a report this week contending that two power plants in the area - C.P. Crane in Baltimore County, and H.A. Wager in Anne Arundel County - are releasing four times as much potentially harmful sulfur dioxide as the Environmental Protection Agency now deems safe.  The group,...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
William C. Farrell Jr., a retired Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. executive, died Sept. 4 of complications from renal failure at his Annapolis home. He was 87. The son of a C&P telephone installer and a homemaker, William Charles Farrell Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Fairmount Avenue. After graduating in 1943 from Polytechnic Institute, he briefly attended the Johns Hopkins University's Whiting School of Engineering before enlisting in the Army that year. Mr. Farrell served with the Signal Corps and was initially assigned to Squire Laboratories Inc. in Revere, Mass., before completing tours of duty in Europe and Japan.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2012
Edward A. Branning Jr., a retired Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone Co. switchman and World War II veteran, died Aug. 28 of heart failure at St. Agnes Hospital. He was 88. The son of a funeral director and a homemaker, Mr. Branning was born in Baltimore and raised on Edmondson Avenue in West Baltimore. He left Polytechnic Institute to enlist in the Navy in 1942 and served as a torpedoman's mate aboard the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown from 1943 to 1945. He was discharged in 1946 and returned to Baltimore, where he earned his high school diploma.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
Nettie V. Freeman, a retired telephone operator who was also an accomplished seamstress, died Saturday of complications from dementia at Golden Living, a Westminster nursing home. She was 89. Nettie Virginia Russell was born and raised in Baltimore. She was a 1941 graduate of Forest Park High School and worked before her marriage as a telephone operator for Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. She was married in 1943 to Richard E. Freeman Jr., an accountant who worked for C.R. Daniels Co., manufacturers of canvas products.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Announcing a run of Neil Simon's "Chapter Two" through March 3, Colonial Players' February newsletter points out that 51/2 years have elapsed since its last staging of a Simon play. Memories of the company's October 2006 production of "Jake's Women" make us wonder why it's taken so long for a Simon play to reappear at this venue, where audiences can share the life experiences of eminently recognizable characters created by the contemporary stage's most successful playwright. Well established in a 20-year writing career by 1973, Simon dealt early that year with the loss of Joan Baim, his wife of 20 years, Later that year, he met and married actress Marsha Mason.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | June 24, 1993
A fiber optics network that would extend to every corner of Maryland, linking high schools and colleges with futuristic audio and video technology, would be built by the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. under an agreement about to be concluded with the state.The project is expected to cost C&P an estimated $30 million to build and take three years to complete. Details are still being worked out, but Gov. William Donald Schaefer -- one of the driving forces behind the proposal -- and C&P officials have tentatively scheduled an announcement for June 30.For C&P, the project is a bold investment in telecommunications infrastructure, opening technology-driven business opportunities for the Bell Atlantic subsidiary.
NEWS
July 7, 1993
For every pithy aphorism, there is an equal but opposite saying. "Haste maketh waste," John Heywood wrote in a collection of colloquial sayings published in 1546. "Do it now," replies William Donald Schaefer. Who's right, Mr. Heywood or Mr. Schaefer? The governor's impatience has produced much good, but it also can lead to quick actions that might not be for the best.The latest example is the state's deal with C&P Telephone to build a fiber optic network connecting schools and colleges. C&P would pay for wiring and provide schools with cameras and other equipment.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2011
Colonial Players' season opener of Agatha Christie's "The Unexpected Guest" begins with several minutes of suspenseful darkness, before a stranger enters the unlit house and shines his flashlight on a woman holding a gun. The stage lights brighten to reveal the woman's dead husband, and the players are off to another exciting season. Director Richard Atha-Nicholls also kept his cast in the dark, in a sense, as he did not allow the performers to read the end of the play until just two weeks before opening night.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Colonial Players' production of Steven Dietz's "Inventing van Gogh" provides an intriguing set of mysteries about the existence of a mythical last self-portrait by the artist, the man himself and the modern art scene. First-time CP director Michelle Harmon rates high marks for meeting the challenges that arose during production. She had signed on to direct "Radio Golf" by August Wilson, which ended up being pulled from the schedule "because of rights issues. " "Inventing van Gogh" was chosen as a replacement.
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