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Cox 2 Inhibitors

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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 18, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Food and Drug Administration whistle-blower David J. Graham told a panel of scientists yesterday that he believed high doses of the Cox-2 inhibitor drug Celebrex pose a risk of increased heart attack or stroke but the risk drops at lower doses. Graham, testifying on his findings on the safety of several painkillers widely used by arthritis patients, also raised the possibility of cardiovascular risk in taking Mobic, or meloxicam. The top-selling drug is from a more traditional class of anti-inflammatory medications.
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NEWS
By MERRILL GOOZNER | December 19, 2005
The specter of researchers hiding damaging data when drug companies financed their clinical trials is once again haunting the medical publishing establishment. Last week, the editors of The New England Journal of Medicine accused Merck-funded researchers of not reporting three deaths in the trial that led to the approval of Vioxx, the pain reliever subsequently pulled from the market because it caused heart attacks in some patients. Medical editors are once again scrambling for better ways to manage these conflicts of interest.
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NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Fetuses and newborns exposed to some common anti-inflammatory drugs may be at risk for lasting changes in brain structure that can affect adult sexual behavior, according to a new study involving rats. While researchers emphasize that the results might not apply in humans, some scientists say they raise the possibility that during a vulnerable window in pregnancy and infancy, these drugs could alter developing human brains, too. Known as COX-2 inhibitors, this class of anti-inflammatories includes aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen and indomethacin.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
The discovery that the painkillers Vioxx and Celebrex may increase the risk of heart problems wasn't just a disappointment to people with chronic pain and the doctors who treat them. The news has threatened to cut off a promising arm of research in cancer prevention. For the last decade, scientists have been compiling evidence that those and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to interfere with the early processes that can give rise to cancer, particularly cancers of the digestive tract.
NEWS
By William Hathaway and William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | December 31, 2004
As doctors and patients grow increasingly leery of the safety of prescription pain relievers and look for alternatives, experts say they need to bear in mind the downside of taking cheaper, over-the-counter medications. People in pain who are concerned about the safety of drugs such as the Cox-2 inhibitors Vioxx, Bextra and Celebrex should not begin to gulp down aspirin and ibuprofen, which cause tens of thousands of deaths and hospitalizations annually from gastrointestinal complications, they say. "We need to remember why Cox-2 inhibitors were invented in the first place," said Dr. Jay Goldstein, a professor of medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a national expert on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
Pfizer Inc. warned yesterday that its popular painkiller, Celebrex, might raise the risk of heart attack. Many experts responded by recommending that patients stop using the drug. Critics said the announcement raises safety questions about all anti-inflammatory drugs in the same category and shows that the Food and Drug Administration is not ensuring the safety of the nation's drugs. "It's more indication that the FDA isn't doing its job," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, head of the consumer activist group Public Citizen, which has warned of problems with Celebrex since 2001.
FEATURES
By Liz Doup and Liz Doup,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 26, 1998
Forget Viagra, the impotence treatment that re-energized the bedroom and the bottom line by its phenomenal sales. Some industry analysts believe a new arthritis painkiller known as COX-2 inhibitors will be the next pharmaceutical wonder."
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
Since Vioxx was withdrawn from the market nine weeks ago, patients and doctors have worried that the popular drug Celebrex, a similar anti-inflammatory, might also increase the risk of heart attack. A study released yesterday eased these fears, but researchers said the jury is still out. In the online Annals of Internal Medicine, scientists reported that patients taking Vioxx were three times as likely to have heart attacks as those on Celebrex. "There was a difference in risk between Celebrex and Vioxx," said the study's lead author, Dr. Stephen Kimmel, a cardiologist and epidemiologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
The discovery that the painkillers Vioxx and Celebrex may increase the risk of heart problems wasn't just a disappointment to people with chronic pain and the doctors who treat them. The news has threatened to cut off a promising arm of research in cancer prevention. For the last decade, scientists have been compiling evidence that those and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to interfere with the early processes that can give rise to cancer, particularly cancers of the digestive tract.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 17, 2005
GAITHERSBURG -- A scientist with Merck & Co. -- which originally took Vioxx off the market believing that similar drugs were not linked with cardiovascular problems -- said yesterday that the company's scientists now believe the entire class of drugs poses such risks. At the first of three days of Food and Drug Administration hearings to examine the safety of such painkillers, Merck senior director Ned S. Blaustein said the drug company now believes that all drugs that work as Vioxx does increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2005
As patients have turned to other painkillers to avoid the cardiovascular risks associated with Vioxx, Bextra and Celebrex, scientists are casting suspicion on several of the substitutes, especially Mobic. Prescriptions for Mobic have tripled since September, when the maker of Vioxx voluntarily withdrew the Cox-2 inhibiting painkiller because of findings of heart problems. Immediately, the maker of Mobic began courting former Vioxx users, through ads and company representatives' visits to doctors.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - An influential Food and Drug Administration advisory committee concluded yesterday that three controversial anti-inflammatory drugs increase heart attacks and strokes, but recommended that the medicines remain available because of their benefits. The decision pleased the drugs' makers but disappointed some researchers and public health advocates, who said that at least two of the three painkilling drugs, which are known as Cox-2 inhibitors, are too dangerous to be on the market.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 18, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - Food and Drug Administration whistle-blower David J. Graham told a panel of scientists yesterday that he believed high doses of the Cox-2 inhibitor drug Celebrex pose a risk of increased heart attack or stroke but the risk drops at lower doses. Graham, testifying on his findings on the safety of several painkillers widely used by arthritis patients, also raised the possibility of cardiovascular risk in taking Mobic, or meloxicam. The top-selling drug is from a more traditional class of anti-inflammatory medications.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 17, 2005
GAITHERSBURG -- A scientist with Merck & Co. -- which originally took Vioxx off the market believing that similar drugs were not linked with cardiovascular problems -- said yesterday that the company's scientists now believe the entire class of drugs poses such risks. At the first of three days of Food and Drug Administration hearings to examine the safety of such painkillers, Merck senior director Ned S. Blaustein said the drug company now believes that all drugs that work as Vioxx does increase the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 13, 2005
BOSTON -- I kind of miss seeing Dorothy Hamill glide across the surface of those Vioxx commercials on her silver blades. The Olympic gold medal winner reminded me of the old joke about the man who asks his surgeon if he'll be able to play the piano after the operation. When the doctor says yes, the man says, "That's funny, I couldn't play it before." I never got beyond a figure eight in my local rink. But I began to have a fantasy that if I popped a couple of Vioxx I could finally do a triple lutz before I got on Medicare.
NEWS
By William Hathaway and William Hathaway,HARTFORD COURANT | December 31, 2004
As doctors and patients grow increasingly leery of the safety of prescription pain relievers and look for alternatives, experts say they need to bear in mind the downside of taking cheaper, over-the-counter medications. People in pain who are concerned about the safety of drugs such as the Cox-2 inhibitors Vioxx, Bextra and Celebrex should not begin to gulp down aspirin and ibuprofen, which cause tens of thousands of deaths and hospitalizations annually from gastrointestinal complications, they say. "We need to remember why Cox-2 inhibitors were invented in the first place," said Dr. Jay Goldstein, a professor of medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a national expert on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, or NSAIDs.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 13, 2005
BOSTON -- I kind of miss seeing Dorothy Hamill glide across the surface of those Vioxx commercials on her silver blades. The Olympic gold medal winner reminded me of the old joke about the man who asks his surgeon if he'll be able to play the piano after the operation. When the doctor says yes, the man says, "That's funny, I couldn't play it before." I never got beyond a figure eight in my local rink. But I began to have a fantasy that if I popped a couple of Vioxx I could finally do a triple lutz before I got on Medicare.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2005
GAITHERSBURG - An influential Food and Drug Administration advisory committee concluded yesterday that three controversial anti-inflammatory drugs increase heart attacks and strokes, but recommended that the medicines remain available because of their benefits. The decision pleased the drugs' makers but disappointed some researchers and public health advocates, who said that at least two of the three painkilling drugs, which are known as Cox-2 inhibitors, are too dangerous to be on the market.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
Pfizer Inc. warned yesterday that its popular painkiller, Celebrex, might raise the risk of heart attack. Many experts responded by recommending that patients stop using the drug. Critics said the announcement raises safety questions about all anti-inflammatory drugs in the same category and shows that the Food and Drug Administration is not ensuring the safety of the nation's drugs. "It's more indication that the FDA isn't doing its job," said Dr. Sidney Wolfe, head of the consumer activist group Public Citizen, which has warned of problems with Celebrex since 2001.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2004
Since Vioxx was withdrawn from the market nine weeks ago, patients and doctors have worried that the popular drug Celebrex, a similar anti-inflammatory, might also increase the risk of heart attack. A study released yesterday eased these fears, but researchers said the jury is still out. In the online Annals of Internal Medicine, scientists reported that patients taking Vioxx were three times as likely to have heart attacks as those on Celebrex. "There was a difference in risk between Celebrex and Vioxx," said the study's lead author, Dr. Stephen Kimmel, a cardiologist and epidemiologist at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.
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