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By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2001
A man sought as a material witness in the fatal shooting March 12 of a Baltimore police officer talked to police yesterday and was released after being questioned by homicide detectives and a deputy state's attorney. William A. "Mookie" Houston, 20, of the 600 block of E. 29th St. and his attorney arrived at the city state's attorney's office in the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse about 3:15 p.m., said Lt. Richard Fahlteich of the homicide unit. Fahlteich said Houston left about 5 p.m. after relating what he had seen the night that Agent Michael J. Cowdery Jr. was fatally shot while two other officers interviewed Houston and another man in the 2300 block of Harford Road.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
Both cops were members of high-profile squads targeting the most dangerous city criminals. One followed his father, a 28-year veteran of the Philadelphia force, into policing. The other took a bullet during combat in Iraq. Both Baltimore officers confronted men with criminal pasts — one for drugs, another for a gun. And both cops got shot — one died, the other survived — on the same street, separated by nearly 10 years to the day. Michael J. Cowdery Jr. interrupted a drug deal and was fatally shot in the 2300 block of Harford Road on March 12, 2001.
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NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
After deliberating for 8 1/2 hours over two days, the 12 members of a Baltimore jury could not agree yesterday on whether Howard "Wee" Whitworth killed a Baltimore police officer on an East Baltimore street last March. They have listened to 12 days of testimony and almost three dozen witnesses who helped re-create and analyze the night that Officer Michael J. Cowdery Jr. was ambushed and gunned down with a bullet to his head. Judge Marcella A. Holland asked jurors to return Monday to continue deliberating.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2002
Saying she cannot let this "bold, brazen, heartless cop killer" ever walk the streets again, Baltimore Circuit Judge Marcella A. Holland sentenced Howard "Wee" Whitworth yesterday to life in prison without parole for executing police Agent Michael J. Cowdery Jr. last year as he lay wounded on a city street. She also sentenced him to another life sentence for shooting Cowdery's partner, Detective Ronald A. Beverly, twice when the two engaged in a running shootout in the rain after Whitworth killed Cowdery the night of March 12 last year.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
Even as friends, relatives and fellow police officers celebrated a guilty verdict yesterday in the trial of the man charged with killing Michael J. Cowdery, they bristled over a defense tactic intended to free defendant Howard "Wee" Whitworth. Last week, Assistant Public Defender John P. Markus suggested during a 90-minute closing argument that an officer planted the murder weapon next to his client. Jurors belittled his comments as they deliberated. And outside the courtroom yesterday, Markus' colleagues in the criminal justice system rebuked his words as well.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2002
Baltimore police officers continued testifying in court yesterday about the cold, rainy night their fellow officer Michael J. Cowdery was gunned down last year. Assistant State's Attorney Donald Giblin and assistant public defender John Markus asked officers questions about the crime scene and a gun found near the site of the killing, though they did not indicate whether they will argue that it is the murder weapon. It was the third day in the murder trial of Howard T. Whitworth, who is accused of ambushing Cowdery, 31, on an East Baltimore street, shooting him in the leg and killing him with a bullet to the head.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2001
Michael J. Cowdery Jr. was a financial manager before he decided that attacking crime was a better job than crunching numbers. Maybe it was the blue uniform he saw his father put on for work at the Philadelphia Police Department. Maybe he just wanted to get away from home. But he knew the economics career he had studied for at Hampton University in Virginia did not excite him. "He didn't seem fulfilled," said Cowdery's father, Michael Sr., 58, speaking publicly yesterday for the first time about his son's death as a Baltimore police officer.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,STAFF WRITER | November 27, 2001
"I don't ever want to forget what happened that night." With those words, Officer Ronald A. Beverly accepted the 2001 Police Officer of the Year Award last night from Baltimore's Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 3, recognition of his actions March 12, after he was wounded and his partner, Agent Michael J. Cowdery Jr., was fatally shot. The inscription on the award - a polished and framed policeman's nightstick - praises Beverly for his "dedication, perseverance and bravery." It was presented by Mayor Martin O'Malley, police Commissioner Edward T. Norris and Gary McLhinney, the lodge president, before an audience of about 200 in Hampden.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2002
The gun used to kill Baltimore Police Officer Michael J. Cowdery Jr. last year had no evidence of blood from him or from the man accused of killing him when it was tested by a state crime lab, a Maryland State Police DNA expert testified yesterday. Lawyers for Howard "Wee" Whitworth called the witness as they tried to show Whitworth never had possession of the gun that killed Cowdery on an East Baltimore street in March of last year. Prosecutor Donald Giblin has portrayed Whitworth, 27, as a "drug dealer and a cold-blooded cop killer," while defense lawyers John P. Markus, Harun Shabazz and Patrick Kent contend their client is a victim of mistaken identity.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2002
The man charged with killing Baltimore police Officer Michael J. Cowdery Jr. in an ambush went on trial yesterday, with prosecutors portraying him as a "cold-blooded cop killer" and his lawyer contending that he was a victim of mistaken identity. Howard T. Whitworth is accused of gunning down Cowdery - who had been on the force for 4 1/2 years and was the son of a career Philadelphia police detective - while the officer and several of his colleagues were questioning two men outside a carryout restaurant in East Baltimore exactly one year ago. In his opening statement, Assistant State's Attorney Donald Giblin told the 12-member jury that on the night of the incident, Whitworth, 32, came out of nowhere and shot Cowdery, 31, in the leg. Everyone on the block scattered, Giblin said, but Whitworth walked over to Cowdery and shot him in the head as he lay disabled on the sidewalk.
NEWS
By Othello Rollon | April 16, 2002
EVERY TOUR of duty, police officers on patrol put their lives on the line going head to head with thugs and drug-dealing vermin infesting the mean streets of Baltimore City's Eastern District. Police patrol these minefields of death with the knowledge that at any moment one of them could become the ultimate police statistic, another officer who'll never again get the opportunity to see the beauty, feel the warmth, smell the aroma, taste the sweetness, hear the melody of family. As a retired New York City police detective, I am filled with anger, hatred, sadness, depression, empathy and sympathy over the unprovoked, wanton and heinous killing of Baltimore Officer Michael J. Cowdery a year ago. I direct my anger and hatred toward the vicious urban predator who callously took the life of a decent, young urban soldier who was trying his best, against all odds, to make a difference in a community devastated by drugs and violence.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | April 14, 2002
WHAT SHOULD Baltimore's citizens do about Assistant Public Defender John Markus? What can be done about him? Nothing. Nothing at all. And it might be best that way. Markus defended Howard Whitworth, the man recently convicted of executing Detective Michael Cowdery of the Baltimore Police Department. On the night of March 12, 2001, Cowdery was questioning a drug addict outside a Chinese carryout on Harford Road. Whitworth shot Cowdery just below the knee from 10 to 15 feet away, then walked up and fired point-blank into Cowdery's head with a .357 Magnum.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
Michael J. Cowdery Sr., a veteran Philadelphia police detective, seethed as he sat in a Baltimore courtroom, glaring at the man accused of executing his son as he lay helpless on a cold city sidewalk last year. The man swore to the jury that it wasn't him, that police had gotten the wrong man. "No, sir," he answered with a hint of cockiness when his attorney asked whether he had shot Cowdery's son. Jaw clenched, nostrils flaring, Cowdery gripped the wooden bench in front of him as his chest rose and fell quickly.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2002
Having lost four games by a combined five goals, McDonogh coach Jake Reed knew his ninth-ranked Eagles "were right there. We just needed all of the kids to come out and play hard at the same time." The host Eagles did just that in yesterday's 11-9 victory over rival and No. 5 St. Mary's in Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association A Conference Division I play. Zak Johns scored McDonogh's eighth and 10th goals during a game-clinching 4-0 run that turned an 8-7 deficit into an 11-8 lead.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 3, 2002
In Baltimore City Number of cases of syphilis drops by 25 percent The number of syphilis cases in Baltimore dropped again last year, continuing a drastic decline for a sexually transmitted disease that had reached epidemic levels in the city five years ago. Last year, Baltimore posted 161 cases, a 25 percent decline from 2000, and a 76 percent drop from 1997, when cases hit their peak, according to Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, city health commissioner....
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2002
The city's police union sent out a letter yesterday urging its membership to "no longer cooperate" with public defenders after one accused an officer of planting evidence in the case against a man later convicted of killing Officer Michael J. Cowdery. The letter tells union members to "show their disgust with the actions of the Public Defender's Office" and to stop accepting plea bargains, probation before judgments or allowing prosecutors to put cases on the inactive docket for a year.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
In a courtroom packed with anxious police officers yesterday, a jury declared Howard "Wee" Whitworth guilty of first-degree murder for firing a bullet into Officer Michael J. Cowdery's head as he lay disabled on an East Baltimore Street in March last year. Cowdery's father pumped his fist and closed his eyes. His mother clutched her jaw and her shoulders convulsed as she sobbed for her son, the most recent Baltimore officer to die in the line of duty. "The feeling is euphoric," said Michael J. Cowdery Sr., a Philadelphia police detective who inspired his son to join the force.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | March 18, 2001
Michael J. Cowdery Jr.'s life was one of contrasts. He studied economics in college, yet became a Baltimore police officer because he couldn't stand a desk job. So polite that he surprised friends by volunteering for an elite squad of aggressive officers tackling crime on the violent east side. So reserved that friends said he would have been embarrassed by a police funeral's pageantry. The 31-year-old was buried yesterday in a cold drizzle after a Mass at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen -- five days after he was ambushed and shot in the head on a Northeast Baltimore street.
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
Even as friends, relatives and fellow police officers celebrated a guilty verdict yesterday in the trial of the man charged with killing Michael J. Cowdery, they bristled over a defense tactic intended to free defendant Howard "Wee" Whitworth. Last week, Assistant Public Defender John P. Markus suggested during a 90-minute closing argument that an officer planted the murder weapon next to his client. Jurors belittled his comments as they deliberated. And outside the courtroom yesterday, Markus' colleagues in the criminal justice system rebuked his words as well.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
In a courtroom packed with anxious police officers yesterday, a jury declared Howard "Wee" Whitworth guilty of first-degree murder for firing a bullet into Officer Michael J. Cowdery's head as he lay disabled on an East Baltimore Street in March last year. Cowdery's father pumped his fist and closed his eyes. His mother clutched her jaw and her shoulders convulsed as she sobbed for her son, the most recent Baltimore officer to die in the line of duty. "The feeling is euphoric," said Michael J. Cowdery Sr., a Philadelphia police detective who inspired his son to join the force.
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