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NEWS
By Edwina Sherudi and Edwina Sherudi,From "Sonnets From a Maryland Suburb." | February 25, 1993
Elizabeth, who was my child, is dead.Her empty coat is draped across a chairBeside the shelves where books she lovedand readHave been already stripped and left so bare;Her bed, without a sheet, stands in its place,The mattress ticking making it so plainThat soon another tenant will eraseAll tinges of her presence and her pain.Elizabeth, who was my child, is here.I see her with her cowboy hat and gun;I see her climbing trees, without a fear;I see her posing as a bride in sun;I see her as the years went on and onBut this is not enough -- for she is gone.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, For The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Tonight on “Dancing with the Stars,” each couple did two full dances. As the couples were introduced, Jacoby Jones was wearing a cowboy hat. We didn't find out why until his first routine, which turned out to be a Viennese waltz to “It's a Man's World.” And the cowboy hat is missing now. Huh. They replay Jacoby's mom yelling at Len last week. My parents are worried she might be turning voters off. We viewers love a protective mom, but we also don't like people griping or talking back to the judges too much.
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NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2000
Sure, the Fourth of July is about being grateful to live in a democracy, remembering our nation's beginnings and listening to "Stars and Stripes Forever." But living up to the tireless role of world power can cause the rest of the globe to overlook another hallmark American trait: its zaniness. A ferret in a cowboy hat, a cow with moon glitter on its face, a bagpiper playing "You're A Grand Old Flag," a man in a sombrero singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" and the Mr. Potato Head beauty contest turned the grounds of the American Visionary Art Museum at 800 Key Highway in Baltimore yesterday into an Independence Day madhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Talk about two political careers going in opposite directions. Last Sunday, I wrote about the top Sunday morning public affairs shows like "Meet the Press"  falling in love with Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and booking him every chance they get. I missed the debut that day of a sorry little 30-minute piece of political propaganda called "Politics Unplugged" -- the product of former governor Bob Ehrlich and his wife, Kendel, buying time Sunday...
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | March 15, 1994
THE Baltimore news this winter has featured yards of copy about the new police commissioner, Thomas C. Frazier, and the series of winter storms that brought education and commerce to a halt.The combination makes Glimpses think of another serious February storm and another commissioner.The year was 1979. The storm was a 22-inch affair that began on Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18, and lasted well into Monday morning. The commissioner was Donald D. Pomerleau, who mounted a horse and made his way through the piled-up snow like some kind of lone rider in a Siberian Western.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 23, 2000
The 5th Regiment Armory was filled to the brim with hats. There were hats -- created by local artists and students -- on the silent auction table and as centerpieces on every dining table for "Hats Off to Walter," a gala to benefit the Maryland chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. There also was the headgear of about 30 local VIPs, who walked down a runway to tip their hats to guest-of-honor Walter Sondheim Jr., longtime Maryland education leader and Baltimore booster. State Superintendent of Schools and event co-chair Nancy Grasmick led the parade in a flowery bonnet, escorted by party co-chair and hubby, Lou Grasmick.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
Donald Wiley positions his wheelchair at the crest of the hill so motorists on Charles Street can't miss him.He nods. He raises his right arm as a wave. Motorists honk, holler and wave back. And they wonder: Who is this guy in the cowboy hat outside Manor Care Nursing Center in Ruxton?"Oh, that's Tex," says Pearl Williams, a certified medical assistant at the center. "That's the first thing people want to know when they find out you work at Manor Care."Thousands of drivers and passengers on this stretch of Charles Street just inside the Beltway pass Mr. Wiley, who goes by "Tex," every day he sits outside.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 2, 1993
I was thinking of sending some money to the Red Cross for the victims of the Midwest flooding.No. Bad idea. They'll just waste it.Waste it?Yeah, they'll spend it on stuff like food, clothing and shelter. There are much needier people you could send your money to.I guess you're right. Like the people in Bosnia.Naw.Somalia?Nope.OK, I give up. Who needs my money the most?Garth Brooks.Garth Brooks?Yeah, you know, the country-Western singer.Which one is he?The one who always wears a cowboy hat.That doesn't narrow it down.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts, For The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Tonight on “Dancing with the Stars,” each couple did two full dances. As the couples were introduced, Jacoby Jones was wearing a cowboy hat. We didn't find out why until his first routine, which turned out to be a Viennese waltz to “It's a Man's World.” And the cowboy hat is missing now. Huh. They replay Jacoby's mom yelling at Len last week. My parents are worried she might be turning voters off. We viewers love a protective mom, but we also don't like people griping or talking back to the judges too much.
FEATURES
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun Staff writer Mark Matthews also contributed to this article | October 31, 1994
Washington -- -- Lafayette Park is a green oasis across the street from the White House where people often claim to be God or the president.Its exotic denizens -- many of whom actually live in the park -- have proven a constant annoyance to the real presidents. Chanting demonstrators camped there helped drive Lyndon Johnson from office. George Bush complained he couldn't sleep because of the pounding of protest drums during the Persian Gulf War.The government has repeatedly gone to court trying to eject protesters and eccentrics from the park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 18, 2010
Cowboy hats, flannel shirts and leather boots dot the dance floor at Cancun Cantina, swaying and shuffling to the sound of a twangy pedal steel guitar. Hundreds of country music lovers come to the Hanover roadhouse every week to boot scoot and boogie their way through dance lessons held Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. It's a rare scene -- a taste of Texas in the shadow of the Mason-Dixon line. Baltimore might straddle the North and the South, but the region has only a handful of true blue country bars.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | December 1, 2006
The NFL Network is running a series of programs, produced by NFL Films, on Super Bowl champion teams, called America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. With NFL Films involved, it comes as no surprise how high the quality is. Each of the 20 shows - telecast in reverse order of the 20 best as chosen by a panel assembled by the NFL Network - is driven by extensive recollections by three members of the team. For example, the piece on the 1992 Dallas Cowboys features Troy Aikman, Michael Irvin and Ken Norton Jr. (Most of the Champions episodes air Friday nights at 8 or 8:30.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 5, 2000
Sure, the Fourth of July is about being grateful to live in a democracy, remembering our nation's beginnings and listening to "Stars and Stripes Forever." But living up to the tireless role of world power can cause the rest of the globe to overlook another hallmark American trait: its zaniness. A ferret in a cowboy hat, a cow with moon glitter on its face, a bagpiper playing "You're A Grand Old Flag," a man in a sombrero singing "The Star-Spangled Banner" and the Mr. Potato Head beauty contest turned the grounds of the American Visionary Art Museum at 800 Key Highway in Baltimore yesterday into an Independence Day madhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | April 23, 2000
The 5th Regiment Armory was filled to the brim with hats. There were hats -- created by local artists and students -- on the silent auction table and as centerpieces on every dining table for "Hats Off to Walter," a gala to benefit the Maryland chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation. There also was the headgear of about 30 local VIPs, who walked down a runway to tip their hats to guest-of-honor Walter Sondheim Jr., longtime Maryland education leader and Baltimore booster. State Superintendent of Schools and event co-chair Nancy Grasmick led the parade in a flowery bonnet, escorted by party co-chair and hubby, Lou Grasmick.
NEWS
By Sam Quinones and Sam Quinones,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 1997
CIUDAD VICTORIA, Mexico -- To the people of the Mexican state of Tamaulipas, it's unclear whether their governor's views on air conditioning are the cause or a symptom of what they sometimes refer to as his "esoterismo."Tamaulipas borders Texas from Laredo to the Gulf of Mexico, then stretches south into the Tropic of Cancer. In such a sweltering region, air cooling, to those who can afford it, would seem a necessity. But Manuel Cavazos Lerma will not cool his office -- though it is said that the stables where he keeps his thoroughbred horses are air-conditioned.
FEATURES
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau of The Sun Staff writer Mark Matthews also contributed to this article | October 31, 1994
Washington -- -- Lafayette Park is a green oasis across the street from the White House where people often claim to be God or the president.Its exotic denizens -- many of whom actually live in the park -- have proven a constant annoyance to the real presidents. Chanting demonstrators camped there helped drive Lyndon Johnson from office. George Bush complained he couldn't sleep because of the pounding of protest drums during the Persian Gulf War.The government has repeatedly gone to court trying to eject protesters and eccentrics from the park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2012
Talk about two political careers going in opposite directions. Last Sunday, I wrote about the top Sunday morning public affairs shows like "Meet the Press"  falling in love with Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and booking him every chance they get. I missed the debut that day of a sorry little 30-minute piece of political propaganda called "Politics Unplugged" -- the product of former governor Bob Ehrlich and his wife, Kendel, buying time Sunday...
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | December 1, 2006
The NFL Network is running a series of programs, produced by NFL Films, on Super Bowl champion teams, called America's Game: The Super Bowl Champions. With NFL Films involved, it comes as no surprise how high the quality is. Each of the 20 shows - telecast in reverse order of the 20 best as chosen by a panel assembled by the NFL Network - is driven by extensive recollections by three members of the team. For example, the piece on the 1992 Dallas Cowboys features Troy Aikman, Michael Irvin and Ken Norton Jr. (Most of the Champions episodes air Friday nights at 8 or 8:30.
NEWS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1994
Donald Wiley positions his wheelchair at the crest of the hill so motorists on Charles Street can't miss him.He nods. He raises his right arm as a wave. Motorists honk, holler and wave back. And they wonder: Who is this guy in the cowboy hat outside Manor Care Nursing Center in Ruxton?"Oh, that's Tex," says Pearl Williams, a certified medical assistant at the center. "That's the first thing people want to know when they find out you work at Manor Care."Thousands of drivers and passengers on this stretch of Charles Street just inside the Beltway pass Mr. Wiley, who goes by "Tex," every day he sits outside.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | March 15, 1994
THE Baltimore news this winter has featured yards of copy about the new police commissioner, Thomas C. Frazier, and the series of winter storms that brought education and commerce to a halt.The combination makes Glimpses think of another serious February storm and another commissioner.The year was 1979. The storm was a 22-inch affair that began on Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18, and lasted well into Monday morning. The commissioner was Donald D. Pomerleau, who mounted a horse and made his way through the piled-up snow like some kind of lone rider in a Siberian Western.
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