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Cowardice

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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Steve Buttry has been posting a series of articles at The Buttry Diary offering advice to top editors. All are instructive, but the latest, on dealing firmly with staff problems , is particularly valuable. If you are a manager at any level, you would do well to examine how he lays out various situations and how he suggests dealing with them. I append a few comments of my own. In journalism, most managers, regrettably, fall into two categories: bullies and cowards. This I have seen at two newspapers myself, and have heard reports from colleagues at scores of others.
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NEWS
March 19, 2014
Learning more about the causes of injury and death and recommending policies that might lengthen people's lives has long been the mission of the public health community. Under those circumstances, it's hardly surprising that those in the field are concerned not only about viruses and infectious agents but also about firearm-related injuries and deaths. For years, doctors have been looking at gun violence, the nature of the injuries it causes and the policies that might prevent it. This is strictly mainstream stuff.
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NEWS
April 13, 1994
The dictionary defines cowardice as "lack of courage, esp., shamefully excessive fear of danger, difficulty or suffering." That sums up the performance of Maryland's General Assembly over the past three months: no stomach for tackling the major issues and no political desire to affront special-interest groups in this election year.This session's list of failures is far longer than the list of successes. The operative word was extreme caution. By doing so, lawmakers ran afoul of that old adage, "No risk, no gain."
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | January 26, 2014
"I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. " -- Martin Luther King, Jr. Sometimes, you get the feeling that's the only King quote conservatives know. They can't quote what he said about unions: "We can all get more together than we can apart. " They can't quote what he said about poverty: "The solution to poverty is to abolish it directly by a now widely discussed measure: the guaranteed income.
NEWS
By Arlen Specter | July 23, 2011
Washington traditionally boasts about its' profiles in courage. Today, facing arguably the greatest potential financial crisis in American history, politics trumps economics as officials focus on the next election instead of the public interest. The leader of the parade in profiles in cowardice is Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell with his ingenious, diabolical proposal, which avoids tough votes for Republicans and places all the blame on Democrats. It's all inside the beltway maneuvering and hard to explain, but it is indispensible for the American people to understand it so public opinion can be mobilized to stop it. Senator McConnell wants an act of Congress to give the president the authority to raise the debt ceiling on his own and then to decide where federal expenditures would be cut. Congress could overrule the president with a resolution of disapproval calculated to fail because it would be vetoed and an override by two-thirds of both houses would be a practical impossibility.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2003
FORT CARSON, Colo. - Not since the Vietnam War has the Army punished a soldier for being too scared to do his duty. But tomorrow, Staff Sgt. Georg-Andreas Pogany will appear before a military court here to face charges of cowardice. The Army says he is guilty of "cowardly conduct as a result of fear" and not performing his duties as an interrogator for a squad of Green Berets in Samarra, Iraq. But Pogany says he did not run from the enemy or disobey orders. The only thing he is guilty of, he says, is asking for help for a panic attack.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1998
A deeply divided Board of County Commissioners yesterday shelved until after the November election the planning commission's proposed master plan to guide Carroll's growth.The plan, which would have directed development to designated growth areas, set goals for preserving 100,000 acres of farmland, and changed the land use on five properties totaling 223 acres to foster economic development.The plan was designed to accommodate a population of 200,000 in the county by 2020, a 34 percent increase over the current population of 149,395.
NEWS
By H.B.Johnson Jr | September 4, 1991
(Maryland Penitentiary, August, 1991)As if stricken by our gloom,the days changed from glowing whitesto dull reds, then slowly into blacks.In scorching steel boxes we satAnd watched that stream of silencesplash its longing portrait upon sealedand dusty windows.Like shadows still,bruised and bleedingin that dark germ of a place,Like flies glued to the bellyof the Emperor's dead cat,We sat.Some of us sat thinking of revenge;Some sat in pernicious cowardice,conspiring to collaboratefurther with the enemy;Some just clutched biblesand wanted to go home.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
George Orwell would be proud to see his ideas vindicated this election year. What Orwell called "Newspeak" - the deliberately impoverished fictional language created by an all-powerful state in his novel "1984" - is now the full-blown language of the day. Take the words "courage" and "cowardice. " Those demonizing others while running for office have convinced us that bullying and attack, even if it leads to death, is courage, while dialogue or compromise with those who hold opposing points of view is cowardice.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau | October 20, 1993
LONDON -- Three-quarters of a century later, it is the inglorious dead who trouble Britain.Alexander MacKinlay asked the House of Commons yesterday to support a pardon for 307 soldiers executed during World War I for cowardice and desertion, for sleeping at their posts, throwing away their guns or hitting a superior officer."
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Steve Buttry has been posting a series of articles at The Buttry Diary offering advice to top editors. All are instructive, but the latest, on dealing firmly with staff problems , is particularly valuable. If you are a manager at any level, you would do well to examine how he lays out various situations and how he suggests dealing with them. I append a few comments of my own. In journalism, most managers, regrettably, fall into two categories: bullies and cowards. This I have seen at two newspapers myself, and have heard reports from colleagues at scores of others.
NEWS
September 21, 2012
George Orwell would be proud to see his ideas vindicated this election year. What Orwell called "Newspeak" - the deliberately impoverished fictional language created by an all-powerful state in his novel "1984" - is now the full-blown language of the day. Take the words "courage" and "cowardice. " Those demonizing others while running for office have convinced us that bullying and attack, even if it leads to death, is courage, while dialogue or compromise with those who hold opposing points of view is cowardice.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2012
The Italian liner Costa Concordia, with 4,200 passengers aboard, piled up in January on the rocky shoreline of Tuscany, tearing out its bottom and capsizing. The death toll has risen to 25, with the recovery of eight more bodies last week. Seven people remain missing. Capt. Francesco Schettino, the Costa Concordia's master, violated one of the noblest and most sacred traditions of the sea when he did not direct the evacuation of passengers and crew. There can be nothing more terrifying for passengers than to see crew members going over the side, as has been alleged by disaster survivors, who described a scene of panic and confusion.
NEWS
By Arlen Specter | July 23, 2011
Washington traditionally boasts about its' profiles in courage. Today, facing arguably the greatest potential financial crisis in American history, politics trumps economics as officials focus on the next election instead of the public interest. The leader of the parade in profiles in cowardice is Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell with his ingenious, diabolical proposal, which avoids tough votes for Republicans and places all the blame on Democrats. It's all inside the beltway maneuvering and hard to explain, but it is indispensible for the American people to understand it so public opinion can be mobilized to stop it. Senator McConnell wants an act of Congress to give the president the authority to raise the debt ceiling on his own and then to decide where federal expenditures would be cut. Congress could overrule the president with a resolution of disapproval calculated to fail because it would be vetoed and an override by two-thirds of both houses would be a practical impossibility.
NEWS
By Paul Thomson | May 19, 2011
Remember John Tyner? He was the young man whose smartphone captured an "enhanced" pat-down at the San Diego Airport — a search immortalized when he warned, "Don't touch my junk. " This simple quote captured how many of us felt about the government getting too much into our business. After this episode, I never imagined publicly using the Department of Homeland Security as an example of government common sense. Unfortunately, recent actions by the Talbot Public County Schools — the suspension of two lacrosse players (and arrest of one of them)
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu and M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- At least 28 people, including five Afghan lawmakers and a number of children, were killed yesterday in one of the country's deadliest suicide attacks since the ouster of the Taliban, authorities said. The bomber struck a sugar factory in Baghlan province, north of Kabul, during a visit by a delegation from the lower house of parliament. The legislators, on an economic fact-finding trip, were being greeted by local dignitaries and children at the time. "The explosion happened when the school students were singing songs to welcome the lawmakers to their province," said Zemeri Bashary, a spokesman for the Interior Ministry.
NEWS
March 7, 2001
GUNS DON'T KILL people. People kill people." Tell that to the parents of the two high school students who died Monday in Santee, Calif. Certainly, there's plenty of blame to go around: The alleged assailant had made threats that his peers seemed to take seriously -- but not seriously enough to alert their parents or authorities. At least one adult, interviewed on national television, indicated that he was aware of the 15-year-old freshman's boast that he planned to shoot up his school.
NEWS
By M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu and M. Karim Faiez and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2007
KABUL, Afghanistan -- At least 28 people, including five Afghan lawmakers and a number of children, were killed yesterday in one of the country's deadliest suicide attacks since the ouster of the Taliban, authorities said. The bomber struck a sugar factory in Baghlan province, north of Kabul, during a visit by a delegation from the lower house of parliament. The legislators, on an economic fact-finding trip, were being greeted by local dignitaries and children at the time. "The explosion happened when the school students were singing songs to welcome the lawmakers to their province," said Zemeri Bashary, a spokesman for the Interior Ministry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alessandra Stanley and Alessandra Stanley,New York Times News Service | November 21, 2004
The networks should just get it over with and run preventive apologies as crawls under all their regular programs: "We are so sorry you just saw that/Please forgive our producer, he lost his head for a second/Gosh, I am such an idiot I could shoot myself." First CBS apologized for interrupting the ending of CSI: NY with a news bulletin that Yasser Arafat had died (that was unforgivable). Then ABC apologized for showing Nicollette Sheridan's bare back in a scripted skit introducing Monday Night Football.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Alane Salierno Mason and Alane Salierno Mason,Special to the Sun | October 10, 2004
The Double, by Jose Saramago. Harcourt. 336 pages. $25. Most English classes teach us that parables and morality tales are antiquated forms of literature, replaced, in the way of natural evolution, by that creation of hardy Anglo-Saxon realism, the novel. But in truth, what new agers call "wisdom literature" has never left us, and the Portugese writer, Jose Sara-mago, has imbued it with enough highbrow knowingness to win him the 1998 Nobel Prize. In his new novel, The Double, Saramago turns to one of the archetypal themes of world literature, as old as folktale and yet deftly pitched to an age of "identity politics."
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