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By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 9, 1996
Dr. Frank Aram Oski, the noted former head of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who campaigned for breast milk rather than cow's milk for infants, died of prostate cancer Saturday at his home in Baltimore. He was 64.Dr. Oski became director of Hopkins' department of pediatrics and pediatrician in chief at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in 1985 after building an international reputation as an expert on children's blood disorders and nutritional deficiencies.In October, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 11, 2010
The question was a simple one: "Got milk?" The answer depended first upon whether a grocery was open in the storm, and then it depended on the store. "No cow's milk. I've got soy and rice milk though," said Edna Mack of the Eddie's Market in the Mount Vernon neighborhood on West Eager Street. "I've got bread, toilet paper, meat, anything but cow's milk." The store was one of those open during the midday hours of Wednesday's storm. "Milk? We ran out yesterday when we first brought it in," said Rayna Williamson, an employee of a CVS pharmacy and store at Charles and 25th streets.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 11, 2010
The question was a simple one: "Got milk?" The answer depended first upon whether a grocery was open in the storm, and then it depended on the store. "No cow's milk. I've got soy and rice milk though," said Edna Mack of the Eddie's Market in the Mount Vernon neighborhood on West Eager Street. "I've got bread, toilet paper, meat, anything but cow's milk." The store was one of those open during the midday hours of Wednesday's storm. "Milk? We ran out yesterday when we first brought it in," said Rayna Williamson, an employee of a CVS pharmacy and store at Charles and 25th streets.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | December 11, 1996
Cheese is among the most versatile of foods, which makes it great for entertaining, whether casual or formal. It works served quite simply, with French bread and a glass of wine or beer, or it can be made far more elegant and complex, such as drizzled with liqueur, topped with apricots, raisins, and pine nuts and lightly baked.We asked a couple of chefs, a purveyor and a cheese book author for some suggestions for serving cheese, and how to select cheeses and accompaniments for a cheese plate (country of origin and type of milk are indicated in brackets after cheese names)
NEWS
October 6, 1992
GRANTED, YOU CAN'T feel too sorry for a guy making $30 million, but Cal Ripken Jr. has his own problems.First comes a headline-making report from the director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and child care expert Dr. Benjamin Spock that cow's milk -- the drink Mr. Ripken endorses as dairy industry spokesman -- can lead to juvenile diabetes and digestive problems in youngsters.Days later, Esskay meats, another product heavily represented by the Orioles' star shortstop in local advertisements, announced the closure of its East Baltimore processing plant after 70 years there because of dangerous structural problems.
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | November 23, 1993
Washington. -- What this country doesn't need is more milk. We were already awash in the stuff when calorie watching and the cholesterol panic scuttled consumption and created new mountains of government-owned butter, cheese and powdered milk. Adding to the woes of the dairy industry, Dr. Spock himself has upset nutritional dogma by proclaiming that children are better off without cow's milk.Meanwhile, through breeding and sophisticated farm management, the modern cow is a super-beast, a masterpiece of efficiency, producing two to three times as much as her ancestors of 30 years ago. And the pace of productivity increases continues.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
For centuries man has played with nature, selectively breeding a cow to produce more milk or a flower to be more brilliant. And like Dr. Seuss, from whose imagination sprang Sneetchs, Lunks and Joats, scientists today are developing fantastic creatures, including salmon with chicken growth hormones and pigs with human blood.Such experiments have limits. "We are certainly not going to be able to create Mr. Ed, the talking horse," said Lawrence Cunnick, president of Biocon Inc. of Rockville.
NEWS
October 16, 1992
Top-heavy costsA recent article stated that Maryland spent more than most states on its roads, per mile. However, the condition of the highways was average to poor.The high expenditures, with less than good results, were attributed to top-heavy administrative costs. I believe this is a characteristic of all levels of our governments.A good beginning would be the legislature. Let's cut legislators' salaries in half and give them 30 days each year to conduct business.If they can't do it in 30 days, the extra time should be uncompensated.
FEATURES
By Dan Hurley and Dan Hurley,Medical Tribune News Service | December 27, 1994
Two new studies have confirmed the theory that drinking cow's milk as an infant raises a person's risk of developing diabetes.Coming on the heels of an analysis of 20 other studies that reached the same conclusion, the suspected link now is "very solid," says Dr. Hans-Michael Dosch, a professor of pediatrics and immunology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto."
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin and Wayne Hardin,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
Telephones have been ringing, fax lines humming and opinions flowing after a group of prominent doctors last week issued an announcement that cow's milk is for cows, not humans.A week ago, four doctors, including Frank A. Oski, director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center, and the 90-year-old Benjamin Spock, supreme potentate-emeritus of baby doctors, held a news conference in Boston to denounce cow's milk.In a preview here the day before, Dr. Oski said: "There is no nutritional reason why anyone should drink milk."
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 9, 1996
Dr. Frank Aram Oski, the noted former head of pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine who campaigned for breast milk rather than cow's milk for infants, died of prostate cancer Saturday at his home in Baltimore. He was 64.Dr. Oski became director of Hopkins' department of pediatrics and pediatrician in chief at Johns Hopkins Children's Center in 1985 after building an international reputation as an expert on children's blood disorders and nutritional deficiencies.In October, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Academy of Pediatrics.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 1996
In recent years, cow's milk has been a suspected causative agent in childhood diabetes. Now, a study published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association says it isn't so.One out of every 300 U.S. children will develop insulin dependent diabetes, a chronic condition requiring daily injections of insulin and close supervision of eating and play, to be sure insulin and calories match up. Mismatches can result in hypoglycemia, unconsciousness or...
FEATURES
By Dan Hurley and Dan Hurley,Medical Tribune News Service | December 27, 1994
Two new studies have confirmed the theory that drinking cow's milk as an infant raises a person's risk of developing diabetes.Coming on the heels of an analysis of 20 other studies that reached the same conclusion, the suspected link now is "very solid," says Dr. Hans-Michael Dosch, a professor of pediatrics and immunology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto."
NEWS
By DANIEL S. GREENBERG | November 23, 1993
Washington. -- What this country doesn't need is more milk. We were already awash in the stuff when calorie watching and the cholesterol panic scuttled consumption and created new mountains of government-owned butter, cheese and powdered milk. Adding to the woes of the dairy industry, Dr. Spock himself has upset nutritional dogma by proclaiming that children are better off without cow's milk.Meanwhile, through breeding and sophisticated farm management, the modern cow is a super-beast, a masterpiece of efficiency, producing two to three times as much as her ancestors of 30 years ago. And the pace of productivity increases continues.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 31, 1993
For centuries man has played with nature, selectively breeding a cow to produce more milk or a flower to be more brilliant. And like Dr. Seuss, from whose imagination sprang Sneetchs, Lunks and Joats, scientists today are developing fantastic creatures, including salmon with chicken growth hormones and pigs with human blood.Such experiments have limits. "We are certainly not going to be able to create Mr. Ed, the talking horse," said Lawrence Cunnick, president of Biocon Inc. of Rockville.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 1992
Not by cow's milk alone does man live. There also has to be soy milk, cornbread and bacon fat and squaw bread. At least that is what I read in the mail and hear on the phone.Born to drink milkFrom: Georgia Corso, Baltimore.Re: Column standing by cow's milkDear Happy Eater,. . . I was raised attached to my own cow. I have always been exceedingly healthy and drink, as an adult, at least 3 glasses of milk at day. I know, my doctor tells me it is way too much, but we all have have our vices.I also have two kids.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 10, 1996
In recent years, cow's milk has been a suspected causative agent in childhood diabetes. Now, a study published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association says it isn't so.One out of every 300 U.S. children will develop insulin dependent diabetes, a chronic condition requiring daily injections of insulin and close supervision of eating and play, to be sure insulin and calories match up. Mismatches can result in hypoglycemia, unconsciousness or...
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 21, 1992
Not by cow's milk alone does man live. There also has to be soy milk, cornbread and bacon fat and squaw bread. At least that is what I read in the mail and hear on the phone.Born to drink milkFrom: Georgia Corso, Baltimore.Re: Column standing by cow's milkDear Happy Eater,. . . I was raised attached to my own cow. I have always been exceedingly healthy and drink, as an adult, at least 3 glasses of milk at day. I know, my doctor tells me it is way too much, but we all have have our vices.I also have two kids.
NEWS
October 16, 1992
Top-heavy costsA recent article stated that Maryland spent more than most states on its roads, per mile. However, the condition of the highways was average to poor.The high expenditures, with less than good results, were attributed to top-heavy administrative costs. I believe this is a characteristic of all levels of our governments.A good beginning would be the legislature. Let's cut legislators' salaries in half and give them 30 days each year to conduct business.If they can't do it in 30 days, the extra time should be uncompensated.
NEWS
October 6, 1992
GRANTED, YOU CAN'T feel too sorry for a guy making $30 million, but Cal Ripken Jr. has his own problems.First comes a headline-making report from the director of the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and child care expert Dr. Benjamin Spock that cow's milk -- the drink Mr. Ripken endorses as dairy industry spokesman -- can lead to juvenile diabetes and digestive problems in youngsters.Days later, Esskay meats, another product heavily represented by the Orioles' star shortstop in local advertisements, announced the closure of its East Baltimore processing plant after 70 years there because of dangerous structural problems.
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