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By CRAIG R. EISENDRATH | August 21, 1995
Philadelphia. -- With the revelations of CIA involvement in murder and torture in Honduras reported in The Sun's recent series, ''Unearthed: Fatal Secrets,'' the case for stricter control of U.S. intelligence operations continues to mount. The Sun found that the Central Intelligence Agency not only trained and funded units in Honduras that committed atrocities but also that the CIA lied to Congress about the extent of its involvement.Honduras is simply the latest scandal. From Irangate, in which the CIA was caught laundering drug money, to Guatemala, where it would appear a CIA-paid colonel was responsible for the torture and murder of the husband of a U.S. citizen, the TC intelligence community has shown a disturbing capacity for criminality.
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NEWS
By Matteo Faini | January 7, 2014
Fifty years ago, Harry Truman wrote an article in the Washington Post expressing his disappointment over what the Central Intelligence Agency had become. He had established the CIA in 1947 to provide his office with objective information. But it had since "been diverted from its original assignment," Truman wrote, and "become an operational and at times a policy-making arm of the government ... injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. " He wanted the CIA to be restored to its original intelligence function and asked "that its operational duties be terminated or properly used elsewhere.
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NEWS
February 18, 2009
The O'Malley administration's attempt to ensure state police can pursue covert operations of legitimate concern on protest groups while protecting civil liberties falls short. That's because it favors the investigators. The legislation now before the Maryland General Assembly has loopholes that even the clumsiest spy could slip through, with or without his trench coat. The state police's past foray into domestic spying demonstrated what can happen when agents work on their own without adequate supervision and guidelines and for an indeterminate period of time: Groups of peaceniks, death penalty opponents and environmentalists are infiltrated without good cause.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
The O'Malley administration's attempt to ensure state police can pursue covert operations of legitimate concern on protest groups while protecting civil liberties falls short. That's because it favors the investigators. The legislation now before the Maryland General Assembly has loopholes that even the clumsiest spy could slip through, with or without his trench coat. The state police's past foray into domestic spying demonstrated what can happen when agents work on their own without adequate supervision and guidelines and for an indeterminate period of time: Groups of peaceniks, death penalty opponents and environmentalists are infiltrated without good cause.
NEWS
By Matteo Faini | January 7, 2014
Fifty years ago, Harry Truman wrote an article in the Washington Post expressing his disappointment over what the Central Intelligence Agency had become. He had established the CIA in 1947 to provide his office with objective information. But it had since "been diverted from its original assignment," Truman wrote, and "become an operational and at times a policy-making arm of the government ... injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. " He wanted the CIA to be restored to its original intelligence function and asked "that its operational duties be terminated or properly used elsewhere.
NEWS
July 30, 1998
This editorial appeared yesterday in the New York Times: Awash with money from Congress for covertly promoting Iraqi opposition to Saddam Hussein, the Clinton administration is once again dreaming about engineering his ouster.The only problem is that no one in Washington has figured out how to do so. Instead, the administration is preparing to renew its courtship with Massoud Barzani, a Kurdish factional leader who betrayed Washington and other opposition groups by forming a temporary military alliance with Baghdad in 1996.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | September 27, 2006
Ten Harford County sheriff's deputies who work in an undercover narcotics task force are being investigated by the sheriff's office for allegedly abusing its alcohol policy and operating county vehicles while under the influence of alcohol, The Sun has learned. The sheriff's office confirmed that an investigation was being conducted, but declined to disclose the nature of the allegations other than they involving violations of the its alcohol prohibitions policy. Spokesman Robert B. Thomas said Sheriff R. Thomas Golding launched the internal investigation after allegations arose about three weeks ago. The officers - members of a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force - remain on the job. "Information came this month to the attention of Sheriff Golding, who immediately gave them top priority," Thomas said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 4, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The prosecution's principal witness in the trial of a former CIA official wound up his testimony yesterday by insisting that the Reagan administration's covert effort to assist the Nicaraguan rebels in the mid-1980s was an "open secret" long before the operation was publicly disclosed.Alan D. Fiers Jr., who formerly headed the agency's covert operations in Latin America, made his assertions in a mostly tedious round of questioning in the Iran-contra trial of Clair E. George, the agency's former deputy director in charge of covert operations.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 12, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The CIA has asked Congress for $19 million next year to continue covert operations to destabilize Iraq and to curb what the administration calls Iran's expansionist ambitions, administration officials say.The operations -- with about $15 million to be spent against Iraq and about $4 million against Iran -- are designed to support the Clinton administration's stated policy goal of "dual containment."The policy is aimed at weakening but not specifically overthrowing Iraq's president, Saddam Hussein; keeping together an anti-Iraq coalition at the United Nations; and strangling Iran's economy as it tries to rebuild its military muscle.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - An influential Pentagon advisory board is calling for a major expansion of the U.S. special forces role in combating terrorism and is seeking a new White House office to plan "pre-emptive" covert operations around the globe. The classified proposals urge the Pentagon to "take the terrorist threat as seriously as it takes major theater war," urging officials to launch secret missions and intelligence operations to penetrate and disrupt terrorist cells abroad. Some of those operations should be aimed at signaling to countries that harbor terrorists that "their sovereignty will be at risk," according to a summary of the Defense Science Board's recommendations, described to the Los Angeles Times.
SPORTS
By BOB KRAVITZ and BOB KRAVITZ,The Indianapolis Star | January 10, 2007
Indianapolis -- It was like a military operation, a bloodless assault on an enemy stronghold. The marching orders, cryptic and limited to a rare few in the know, were coming through in the spring of 1984. To an Indianapolis-based college student named David Pidgeon, whose father, Dick, was general manager of Hogan Transfer & Storage/Mayflower and wanted his son to help with a job the next afternoon. To Haydon Hapak, an Indianapolis-born Mayflower employee working in Chicago at the time, who had been told by higher-ups to find trucks along the Eastern seaboard that could rendezvous in Alexandria, Va., for a secret mission outside of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2006
MIAMI -- He has admitted bombing Havana hotels, served time for plotting to assassinate Fidel Castro and, for more than 20 years, was a fugitive charged with blowing up a Cuban airliner. But 17 months after Luis Posada Carriles was arrested and sent to a Texas immigration lockup, U.S. officials have declined to label him a terrorist or charge him with a crime. On Friday, a federal judge in El Paso, Texas, gave the U.S. government until Feb. 1 to bring a case against Posada or free the reputed bomber.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | September 27, 2006
Ten Harford County sheriff's deputies who work in an undercover narcotics task force are being investigated by the sheriff's office for allegedly abusing its alcohol policy and operating county vehicles while under the influence of alcohol, The Sun has learned. The sheriff's office confirmed that an investigation was being conducted, but declined to disclose the nature of the allegations other than they involving violations of the its alcohol prohibitions policy. Spokesman Robert B. Thomas said Sheriff R. Thomas Golding launched the internal investigation after allegations arose about three weeks ago. The officers - members of a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force - remain on the job. "Information came this month to the attention of Sheriff Golding, who immediately gave them top priority," Thomas said.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 22, 2005
SO, GIRLFRIEND. Did he give you something sexy for Valentine's Day? Did it fit? Would you be caught dead in it? Did you feel like you should talk price before you put it on? If that gift of lingerie created issues instead of opportunities, your significant other clearly didn't have the chance to read "The Gentleman's Guide to Buying Lingerie," which appeared this month in Today's Officer, a publication of the Military Officers Association of America. Count on the military to find new avenues for training.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2003
Frederick A. Allner Jr., a retired CIA covert-operations specialist, died of pneumonia Saturday at Sibley Memorial Hospital in Washington. The Bethesda resident was 79. Mr. Allner, who was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park, graduated from Gilman School in 1942. His college studies at Princeton University were interrupted when he enrolled in the Navy's V-12 program at Cornell University, which provided accelerated officer training during World War II. Commissioned an ensign, he served in China during the war with the Sino-American Cooperative Organization as an intelligence officer and liaison to the Chinese Army.
NEWS
By Greg Miller and Greg Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - An influential Pentagon advisory board is calling for a major expansion of the U.S. special forces role in combating terrorism and is seeking a new White House office to plan "pre-emptive" covert operations around the globe. The classified proposals urge the Pentagon to "take the terrorist threat as seriously as it takes major theater war," urging officials to launch secret missions and intelligence operations to penetrate and disrupt terrorist cells abroad. Some of those operations should be aimed at signaling to countries that harbor terrorists that "their sovereignty will be at risk," according to a summary of the Defense Science Board's recommendations, described to the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld is considering ways to broadly expand the role of U.S. Special Operations forces in the global campaign against terrorism, including sending them worldwide to capture or kill al-Qaida leaders, according to Pentagon and intelligence officials. Proposals being discussed by Rumsfeld and senior military officers could lead Special Operations units to become more deeply involved in long-term covert operations in countries where the United States is not at war and, in some cases, where the local government is not informed of their presence.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | January 22, 1991
Apollonius of Tyana was a first century A.D. philosopher who became an object of worship as a kind of pagan Christ figure. In "Apollonius' Dream," sculptor Jonathan Silver has fashioned a gloomily effective installation at the C. Grimaldis Morton Street gallery (as part of a four-person show at both the Morton and Charles Street spaces) that crushingly illuminates the folly of human dreams and human striving.In a dim rectangular "room" the philosopher lies, presumably dead, on a bed supported by sawhorses.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 12, 2002
WASHINGTON - Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld is considering ways to broadly expand the role of U.S. Special Operations forces in the global campaign against terrorism, including sending them worldwide to capture or kill al-Qaida leaders, according to Pentagon and intelligence officials. Proposals being discussed by Rumsfeld and senior military officers could lead Special Operations units to become more deeply involved in long-term covert operations in countries where the United States is not at war and, in some cases, where the local government is not informed of their presence.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2000
Some Western District police officers are threatening not to make drug arrests after their commanders, angry about Sunday's triple shooting in Harlem Park, ordered them to stop undercover drug surveillance and spend more time locking up loiterers. About a half-dozen officers said yesterday that Lt. John Mack "chewed out" his patrol units during morning roll call because they failed to prevent a gunman, armed with an AK-47, from shooting three men Sunday morning in the 1100 block of Harlem Ave. in Harlem Park.
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