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NEWS
February 10, 2014
Even his supporters must have gotten a chuckle out of House Speaker John Boehner's declaration that immigration reform is in its death throes in his chamber because President Barack Obama can't be trusted to enforce whatever law they pass. As a bit of political theater, it was a great way to tie in Republican 2014 talking points about health care reform and executive orders, but the demise of immigration reform is strictly a single party affair. Pardon us while we restate the obvious.
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NEWS
February 10, 2014
Even his supporters must have gotten a chuckle out of House Speaker John Boehner's declaration that immigration reform is in its death throes in his chamber because President Barack Obama can't be trusted to enforce whatever law they pass. As a bit of political theater, it was a great way to tie in Republican 2014 talking points about health care reform and executive orders, but the demise of immigration reform is strictly a single party affair. Pardon us while we restate the obvious.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kathy Lally and Story by Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | December 23, 2001
The little crowd presses close to the man with the list. He calls out the first name and a frisson of eagerness, of expectation and even hope roils from one to another, women wearing layers of mismatched castoffs, men in tattered caps and suits worn long past respectability, children in anything that fits. Hands reach upward, to the back of the truck, to the outstretched arms passing out small piles of quilts. They reach up in desperation and yearning. The long journey is at an end. Some of the quilts stitched in Perry Hall by the women of St. Michael Lutheran Church have reached their destination, 7,000 miles away, in the Muslim country of Azerbaijan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jenn Ladd | April 24, 2012
Ever since he was a kid, Benjamin Arem wanted to be a lawyer. When he graduated from Muhlenberg College in 2006, Arem put his law school aspirations on hold to become an accountant. All the while, law remained his passion. So, in the fall of 2009, he enrolled in the University of Baltimore School of Law. Now about to graduate, Arem is nervous of his prospects. He scours job listings, sends reams of resumes and cover letters, but hasn't gotten any solid leads. "I've gone from having a well-paid, stable job and being debt-free, to now drowning in debt and being unemployed," Arem said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Story by Kirsten Scharnberg | December 19, 1999
In a small-town greasy spoon where the house special is a fried oyster sandwich and a waitress named June doles out kisses with coffee, three old friends gather to brag about the glory days, when they were household names who saw the limelight's spectacular glare from the best seats in the house.The first man weaves stories of presidents.The second, of kings.And the third, of far-off lands, well-loved astronauts and international intrigue."When President Bush and I were in the Middle East for Thanksgiving ..."
FEATURES
June 5, 2003
Here is contact information for the Red Hat Society, subject of a cover story by Susan Reimer in Tuesday's Today section. Women interested in finding a Red Hat Society chapter in their area should e-mail Dee Vallair and the Red Hat Hons of Baltimore at redhathons@hot mail.com.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 4, 1998
Any president proposing to reduce class size by one-third in Baltimore primary grades can't be all bad.Ending deficits means little. If they don't reduce the national debt and interest payments, they aren't doing anything.When Bill suggested Monica come up with a cover story, he didn't mean a Newsweek cover.Bombing Baghdad might not make us feel better for long, or Saddam feel worse.Pub Date: 2/04/98
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 18, 2000
WHAT ARE the main principles of investment success? Family Money, Sept.-Oct., runs a cover story, "The Only Things You Must Know To Make Money in Stocks." Summary: Systematic investing improves results dramatically. You develop discipline to stay in the market for the long term rather than pull out when it heads south. Most important: Don't put all your eggs in one basket because if your stock lags, you won't have others to offset your losses. Long-term, growth stocks are your surest bet. Companies with strong earnings growth are easier to spot than promising "value" stocks.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | April 14, 1991
This week's cover story on multimillionaire Reginald Lewi came about in a roundabout way. Features writer Mary Corey hadn't planned to do a profile on him, but she had heard that The Sun had been trying to get an interview for three or four years without success. Writers had been told he just wasn't talking.Mary, meanwhile, was working on a feature story about actors Tim Reid and Daphne Maxwell Reid. During the interview, Tim Reid told her that Reginald Lewis was a role model for black people and a personal hero of his. She wanted to use the quote in her story, so she called Lewis' international company, TLC Beatrice, to confirm a couple of things.
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | March 10, 1996
Granted, Pat Buchanan has the demeanor of a bulldog with a hernia, and many of his views are odious. But there's no gainsaying the fact he has shone klieg lights on a group the elite was content to leave in the shadows: the "anxious class."You don't think so? Check your local newsstand.In one way or another, the current issues of Business Week, Atlantic Monthly, Mother Jones and Wired magazines all grope for the hot buttons Mr. Buchanan has been gleefully pushing on the campaign trail: worker anxiety, wage stagnation, income inequality, record corporate profits and staggering CEO salaries accompanied by massive layoffs.
FEATURES
By Dennis Hockman, ChesapeakeHome | October 16, 2010
With family holidays approaching and a potential long winter stuck indoors ahead, now's the time to start thinking about what can be done to re-energize your decor. Of course shopping, entertaining and heating bills are also on the horizon, so a full-scale interior makeover might not be in the budget. Minor changes are sometimes all it takes to reinvent a space — a different color paint, wallpaper, or updated lighting can dramatically transform a room. But there's not much you can do about that tattered old sofa or chair.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | August 11, 2008
I go out to the mailbox the other day and there, curled up in the middle of the bills and junk mail that arrive like daily torture, is the new issue of O: The Oprah Magazine. This magazine is so thick, you could club somebody to death with it. It has 7,000 stories in every issue and all these ads and photos. If you're a mail carrier, you have to join a gym or start taking steroids to lift this thing out of your truck. This is why you see so many mail carriers with back problems. Lug a dozen O's around on an average route and you're wearing a truss for the rest of your life.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
For 17 of the 22 years they spent together, Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln cheated the laws of gravity. Their marriage was forged from the heavy materials dug from the earth, yet it was engineered with such precision it could ride on a puff of air. It was only after Lincoln went to the White House, according to Baltimore author Daniel Mark Epstein, that the couple's delicate balance began to lose its equilibrium. Epstein, 59, has chronicled the pair's loving, turbulent relationship in The Lincolns: Portrait of a Marriage.
NEWS
By Stephen G. Henderson and Stephen G. Henderson,Special to The Sun | April 6, 2008
It's been nearly two decades since Nelson Mandela was freed from prison. Four years after his 1990 release, he became the president of South Africa and led his country into desegregated democracy. In his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom, Mandela said, "There's no use to dwell in the past. Only remember it, so you can avoid these same mistakes. To build a new future, dwell in the present." Taking Mandela's words to heart, his beloved country has moved forward. No one has forgotten apartheid, of course.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Sun reporter | February 8, 2008
When Michael Gvozden talks, it's hard for people to listen. Gvozden, the sophomore goalkeeper for the Johns Hopkins men's lacrosse team, has grown hoarse, and his voice has taken on a raspy quality after several weeks of directing and screaming at his defense during practice. Gvozden's predicament is a result of adjusting to his new role as the starter for the defending national champions. But Gvozden doesn't mind sipping tea and gulping down spoonfuls of lemon juice as long as he can contribute to the No. 1 Blue Jays' bid for a second consecutive crown and third in the past four years.
NEWS
By Harold T. Fisher and Harold T. Fisher,Special to The Sun | December 2, 2007
Later this month, the Hazell family of Northwest Baltimore will celebrate Christmas, like so many other African-Americans who participate in the Christian holiday based on the birth of Jesus. Olivia Hazell also includes the ethnocentric holiday Kwanzaa in her family's end-of-year festivities, something she has done for the past 17 years. "What attracted me [to Kwanzaa] was seeing black people together, as we say in church, on one accord," Hazell says. "Seeing everybody ... with the same focus.
FEATURES
By Michael Davis | April 25, 1993
By reading today's cover story, you'll learn that in matters o home design, fun is in.If that's true (and I have no reason to doubt our eminently reliable cover story writer, Elizabeth Large), my wife and I are ahead of the curve for once in our lives.Our house is decorated with fun touches, including:* A duo of stuffed fabric parrots hanging from a door frame. They came from exotic Philadelphia.* A "school" of paper-sculpture fish crafted by Baltimore-born artist Liseanne Monier-List, owner of the Terra Cotta Gallery in Kill Devil Hills, N.C.* A framed, hand-tinted original illustration of Terrytoons hero Tom Terrific and Mighty Manfred the Wonder Dog, Tom's reluctant but loyal companion.
NEWS
February 6, 2005
Welcome to UniSun, The Sun's publication created especially for African-American readers. It is fitting that this first issue produced by The Sun's newsroom staff is published during Black History Month. While we plan to celebrate African-American heritage all year round, we thought that we would herald the monthlong commemoration with a cover story on researching your family roots. Three experts share their experiences with UniSun readers and offer tips for those thinking about learning more about their ancestors.
NEWS
February 4, 2007
Jonathan Pitts Pitts, a graduate of Haverford College and the University of Missouri School of Journalism, has been writing features for The Sun for seven years. His stories have won recognition from the Society of Professional Journalists, the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors and the Missouri Lifestyle Journalism Program. He is co-author, with Whitney Herzog, of You're Missin' a Great Game (Simon and Schuster, 1999). Pitts wrote our cover story in which he became a slave for a day in an immersion program that takes participants back to the 1850s (Article, Page 18)
NEWS
By Article By Jonathan Pitts and Article By Jonathan Pitts,SUN REPORTER | February 4, 2007
It's late in the afternoon -- 5 o'clock, you reckon by the setting of the sun -- and your breath rises in clouds as you look at the pile of straw beside your feet. It's a goodly stack, 2 feet high if it's an inch, as big a one as you've made all day. You look over at the other slaves in the field -- Rebecca, Charles, Anne and the rest -- and you see it's bigger than theirs. You hope the slave driver comes by and takes notice. It might get you a little more to eat tonight, maybe a blanket to keep the cold away.
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