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By Amy L. Bernstein | October 8, 1996
THE DOORBELL rang and there stood a stranger -- a tall, slim man with close-cropped hair and clean brown eyes, whom I'll call Troy. ''Mow your lawn?'' he asked. I said yes and we negotiated a price. Troy did the work, I paid him in cash (of course) and away he went, in search of other patrons with overgrown grass.For years my husband and I have been willing co-conspirators in Baltimore's thriving underground economy. Men like Troy come by often. Men who either do not hold steady jobs or do not make enough to make ends meet.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
"I've made many painful mistakes in my life. I want my death to have some meaning. " -- Myrtle Snow "American Horror Story" wrapped its third season with a strong finale, focusing on themes of mortality and motherhood. The show got lost when it strayed from those ideas this year, often attempting to shock its audience, seemingly at the expense of cohesive plot and logic. But as the finale showed, when it wanted to, Coven could tell a compelling story, even without much of its trademark violence and gore.
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NEWS
By Orlando Patterson | November 16, 1992
IT HAS taken two centuries of struggle for America to remedy the egregious compromises that made its Constitution possible.The election of Bill Clinton, along with his running mate, another young Southerner, may mark a watershed in this historic remedy, one that holds special hope for African-Americans, for women and for all who now feel insecure and alienated from the American dream.One powerful theme ran through his speeches at the Democratic convention and on election night: the Puritan ideal of America as a covenanted society.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ethan Renner and For The Baltimore Sun | January 23, 2014
"Eventually, everybody pays, everybody suffers. " -- Papa Legba In the last episode before its season finale, "American Horror Story: Coven" tightened its plot, while seemingly writing out three major players. For all of my complaints about its meandering storytelling and brutal violence, this is a show that knows how to tell a lean, sharp story when it needs to, and that was the case with "Go to Hell. " The brutal violence was still on display, but this was a fast-moving hour that set up the finale nicely.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
The Columbia Association has filed five lawsuits in Howard County Circuit Court, charging homeowners with covenant violations, as it tries to address rising complaints about deteriorating -- or just plain unsightly -- properties in the 30-year-old planned community.The alleged violations range from relocating a fence without permission to failing to trim backyard trees and bushes, to refusing to remove algae from house siding and a deck."I can agree with part of the deal to try to keep this place looking nice," said William Dragovich of Chase Lions Way in Dorsey's Search, who relocated a 5-foot-tall wooden fence and is facing a lawsuit.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2000
The Columbia Council has voted to remove the $100,000 designated in the city's proposed budget to help solve academic and image problems at some older schools. Cecilia Januszkiewicz, the council member from Long Reach who proposed including the one-time expenditure in the Columbia Association's preliminary budget, recommended taking out the funds at a work session Thursday night, saying it would be too difficult for the council to agree on how to administer them. Several villages had strongly opposed the measure.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Kings Contrivance village board members and residents criticized the Columbia Association last night for its handling of a long-standing property covenant violation and questioned its commitment to enforcing the architectural standards that distinguish Columbia."
NEWS
By Felicia Pride and Felicia Pride,Special to The Sun | October 7, 2007
When media personality Tavis Smiley unveiled The Covenant With Black America in 2006, Charisse Carney-Nunes, a 40-year-old mother of two, felt something was missing from the blueprint for social change: children. In an adamant voice, Carney-Nunes recalls what she announced to her colleagues at the Jamestown Project, a think tank involved with the Tavis Smiley Group to advance the goals of the New York Times best-selling book: "No movement for social change has ever been successful until you tap into the young people, reach into their hearts and minds and inspire them to get involved and make a difference."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
Columbia homeowners who paint their front doors pink or whose back porches have fallen into disrepair face a greater likelihood of being caught -- and penalized -- as part of an impending crackdown on covenant violations communitywide. Under a series of far-reaching policy recommendations in draft form, residents repeatedly notified of violations would be denied access to Columbia Association facilities, such as pools and health clubs. And, under a three-year pilot program that could eventually be expanded throughout the city, homeowners in three older villages would face more aggressive property inspections.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
A Columbia Council member proposed adding $140,000 to next fiscal year's budget last night to strengthen enforcement of covenants in the town. Tom Forno of Harper's Choice, chairman of the council's Covenant and Design Committee, asked that the council include $70,000 for a second staff attorney and $35,000 for three part-time covenant advisers in the Columbia Association budget. Forno asked for an additional $35,000 to pursue state legislation that would crack down on homeowners with covenant violations.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1998
Columbia resident James M. Stuart has avoided a possible jail stay in a legal battle over his housekeeping, settling his dispute with Columbia Association authorities before it got to a judge.Stuart faced a contempt of court charge after being sued by the association for allegedly violating strict aesthetic rules, known as covenants. At issue were algae on the side of his house in Owen Brown, a trampoline-turned-planter in his back yard and a 1974 Corvette that CA officials thought was out of commission that he kept in the driveway.
NEWS
July 12, 1993
Crofton's police budget and neighborhood watch program will be two of the main topics on the agenda tonight for the Crofton Civic Association's Board of Directors.Police Chief Deborah Bogush, who heads a four-member force for the special tax district, is expected to present a list of items that she may request in her budget for the next fiscal year.The community, with a population of about 10,000, has a $580,000 annual budget. About half is spent on the police force, which supplements county police protection.
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