Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCouscous
IN THE NEWS

Couscous

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Waltrina Stovall and Waltrina Stovall,Universal Press Syndicate | October 23, 1991
One theory about how couscous got its name says that it is derived from an African word meaning "pecked at," because the small, grainy pellets resemble the rolled bits of food a bird feeds its young.Another -- shades of Edgar Allan Poe -- is that it is an onomatopoeic word.I like the second explanation, and I can't think of another food that could be used to illustrate the meaning of onomatopoeia, which you will remember from high school English is a word formed by imitating a natural sound associated with an object or action.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,Sun reporter | March 19, 2008
The Perfect Recipe for Losing Weight & Eating Great By Pam Anderson Weight Watchers All-Time Favorites Over 200 Best-Ever Recipes From the Weight Watchers Test Kitchens Wiley / $29.95 / 2008 This book has no inspiring back story, no narrative, nothing but 225 recipes. The Weight Watchers people don't even bother to tell you how they chose these best-ever ideas. But like Pam Anderson's, the recipes are not diet-y. And they're good. Here, too, the portions are small. The Mussels in Spicy Tomato Broth - easy to make and it turned out well - tells you to eat 30 mussels (OK)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 1, 2004
I need to know the difference between regular couscous and Israeli couscous. The first time I saw Israeli couscous was when I was on a show called Ready-Set-Cook that was on Food Network in the mid-late M-F90s. It pitted one chef against another. A mystery bag would get dumped in front of one chef; the other chef would have a completely different bag. They had 30 minutes to prepare a meal using the ingredients therein. One of mine was these little balls of Israeli couscous M-ywhich I had never worked with before.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
A tagine (pronounced "tah-zheen") is a hallmark of Moroccan cooking. The slow-simmered stew mingles meats and vegetables with spices, such as cumin and cinnamon. This Moroccan Stew With Roasted Vegetables pairs chicken and prunes, an ancient combination that continues to offer good nutrition. Sometimes marketed as "dried plums," prunes are a quick source of energy and aid in the absorption of iron. A quarter cup of the fruit contains 317 milligrams of potassium, which promotes heart health.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 31, 1996
This healthy and hasty dish hails from the Mediterranean region, where capers and bell peppers abound. You'll notice that the cooking technique makes efficient use of all the ingredients: The juice from the tomatoes is used first to steam the bell peppers and chicken. It is then thickened slightly for the sauce.Look for couscous in the pasta and rice section of the supermarket or the gourmet aisle. Since the version we use is quick-cooking, it will fluff up in about five minutes.For dessert, buy shortbread cookies made with real butter (the difference can be tasted)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 19, 2001
For an easy backyard cookout, there will be bowls of good Mediterranean black and green olives and a little plate of toasted almonds. Skewers of cantaloupe and honeydew wedges will be arranged on another tray. For the main course, we'll grill rib lamb chops marinated in olive oil seasoned with garlic, cumin and cayenne pepper and serve them with fluffy couscous tossed with golden raisins and scented with orange and mint. Grilled corn-on-the-cob as well as sliced tomatoes sprinkled with fresh herbs will complete the side dishes.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL United Feature Syndicate | April 28, 1996
When it comes to speed, it doesn't get any better than instant couscous. Actually a form of pasta, couscous is made from golden semolina flour, mixed with water and rolled into tiny grains.Traditional couscous requires a long period of steaming and repeated sprinkling with fresh water and rolling between the palms to break up the clumps that form. But even in Morocco, where it is the national dish, cooks often opt for the instant version, which is what Americans find on their supermarket shelves.
FEATURES
By SUZANNE LOUDERMILK | June 23, 1999
Cheers for chutney, a versatile relishTake a seat, salsa. Chutney is stepping up to the plate. According to the July-August issue of Metropolitan Home, chutney is the newest condiment to dazzle American cooks. This versatile Indian relish, with its range of spiciness and textures, adds interesting flavors to ordinary dishes. The magazine's editors suggest coconut chutney to perk up a sandwich or a pear-cranberry version to go with roast duck or chicken.The selling of couscousCheck out the new TV commercial on couscous.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 29, 1998
This recipe gives an exotic character to homey root vegetables. An adaptation from Bon Appetit magazine, the dish has been revised to work for our fast-paced schedules and is a meal in itself. The stew, however, is greatly enhanced by a side dish of couscous garnished with toasted pepitas (pumpkin seeds) and scallions.A creamy custard or pudding topped with fresh wedges of oranges makes a great companion to the entree.North African StewServes 41 pound sweet potatoes, skin scrubbed2 parsnips, peeled8 ounces turnips or rutabagas, peeled1 pound boneless skinless chicken thighs, cut into 1-inch cubes1 cup chopped onion2 cloves garlic, minced1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced1 teaspoon ground cumin1/2 teaspoon cinnamon1/2 cup chicken broth1 (16 ounce)
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2007
When good friends who live in Washington telephoned recently to say that they would be in town for several days, I immediately marked a date on the calendar when we could get together. Originally, I had thought that we might dine out, but while testing recipes this past week, I realized that a new dish I had been working on would make a perfect entree to serve four. That recipe was for sauteed scallops dusted in smoked paprika, served atop a mound of saffron and orange-scented couscous.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | January 27, 2007
When good friends who live in Washington telephoned recently to say that they would be in town for several days, I immediately marked a date on the calendar when we could get together. Originally, I had thought that we might dine out, but while testing recipes this past week, I realized that a new dish I had been working on would make a perfect entree to serve four. That recipe was for sauteed scallops dusted in smoked paprika, served atop a mound of saffron and orange-scented couscous.
NEWS
By SHEILA YOUNG and SHEILA YOUNG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 4, 2006
Sometimes all the ingredients are there for a magnificent dish, but they don't add up to magic for some reason. And sometimes all the ingredients are there for a superb restaurant - and yet missing the magic, it is less than what it could be. Such was a recent visit to the Kings Contrivance. Kings Contrivance could be the premier restaurant in the region. In an area where land is hard to find and even harder to pay for, it has plenty. Its country-house setting feels miles away from the nearest neighbor, setting a gracious mood without making guests drive for hours.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX and CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 19, 2005
Pork tenderloin plays many roles. The sauced king of the gourmet dinner. The grilled picnic prince. Or the quick kebabed mate for a sassy red pepper. Take your pick. For me, the cubed version is the best choice for any get-it-on-the-table-fast meal. I give it a Mediterranean hit with a cumin and hot paprika coating. Another fast actor completes the entree: couscous. Cook it with lightly sauteed sweet onions, such as Vidalia or Maui varieties, and top it with the kebabs. Carol Mighton Haddix writes for the Chicago Tribune.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman and Candace Hagan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 1, 2004
I need to know the difference between regular couscous and Israeli couscous. The first time I saw Israeli couscous was when I was on a show called Ready-Set-Cook that was on Food Network in the mid-late M-F90s. It pitted one chef against another. A mystery bag would get dumped in front of one chef; the other chef would have a completely different bag. They had 30 minutes to prepare a meal using the ingredients therein. One of mine was these little balls of Israeli couscous M-ywhich I had never worked with before.
NEWS
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 16, 2004
Normally, I would make my own meatballs. But time is short during the week and sometimes, you just gotta take a shortcut. I had never had packaged, frozen meatballs before one family get-together last holiday season, when a sister who shall remain nameless bought a couple of bags of them, then jazzed them up with a sweet-and-sour sauce. Not bad! Taking her cue, I came up with this quick stew one night after work. Using a few Moroccan spices, I turned the plain meatballs into something more unusual, then teamed them with even faster-cooking couscous.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 10, 2003
One wouldn't normally expect a Budweiser mirror or inexpensive chili-pepper posters in a restaurant that serves dishes like lobster and asparagus hand rolls and Moroccan grilled sea prawns, but at the Timber Creek Tavern, the casual decor and highfalutin' food make a fine combination. Stuart Denrich took over the decades-old tavern about a year ago and installed his son, 24-year-old Aharon Denrich, as executive chef. The food is influenced by Asia, Africa and the Mediterranean, by way of the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, N.Y., where Aharon Denrich learned his way around a kitchen.
FEATURES
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 13, 2002
Shrimp, though a pricey option, is one of the fastest-cooking entrees for weekday cooking. Whether it comes from your freezer or the fishmonger, it cooks in just a few minutes. In fact, you'll want to cook shrimp only until it turns pink. Cooking it any longer will result in tough, chewy morsels. The recipe here teams the seafood with classic Middle Eastern spices for a quick marinade and then spoons it over another quick-cooking ingredient, instant couscous. A sliced beet salad is one side option, using bottled pickled beets or plain, according to your taste.
NEWS
By CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX and CAROL MIGHTON HADDIX,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 19, 2005
Pork tenderloin plays many roles. The sauced king of the gourmet dinner. The grilled picnic prince. Or the quick kebabed mate for a sassy red pepper. Take your pick. For me, the cubed version is the best choice for any get-it-on-the-table-fast meal. I give it a Mediterranean hit with a cumin and hot paprika coating. Another fast actor completes the entree: couscous. Cook it with lightly sauteed sweet onions, such as Vidalia or Maui varieties, and top it with the kebabs. Carol Mighton Haddix writes for the Chicago Tribune.
FEATURES
By Carol Mighton Haddix and Carol Mighton Haddix,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 13, 2002
Shrimp, though a pricey option, is one of the fastest-cooking entrees for weekday cooking. Whether it comes from your freezer or the fishmonger, it cooks in just a few minutes. In fact, you'll want to cook shrimp only until it turns pink. Cooking it any longer will result in tough, chewy morsels. The recipe here teams the seafood with classic Middle Eastern spices for a quick marinade and then spoons it over another quick-cooking ingredient, instant couscous. A sliced beet salad is one side option, using bottled pickled beets or plain, according to your taste.
NEWS
By Susan Nicholson and Susan Nicholson,Universal Press Syndicate | December 2, 2001
Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost-cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining meal that's quick. SUNDAY / Family Sweet and Sour Lamb Kebabs please the whole family -- especially when it's accompanied by couscous tossed with golden raisins. Add a spinach and sliced mushroom salad along with pita bread.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.