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November 25, 2013
HCC Actors Guild will present "Fairytale Courtroom" Dec. 6 to 8 and 13 to 15 at the Blackbox Theatre in Joppa Hall on the Harford Community College campus. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. on Dec 6, 7, 13 and 14; 11 a.m. on Dec. 7 and 14; and 3 p.m. on Dec. 8 and 15. The Big Bad Wolf and the Wicked Witch have been frolicking from fairy tale to fairy tale, wreaking havoc as they try to prevent anyone from living happily ever after. The time has come for them to stand trial for their destructive deeds.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
For the first time in decades, the job of Anne Arundel County's top prosecutor is up for grabs, as two hard-charging lawyers vie to become the elected replacement for longtime State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee. Democrat Anne Colt Leitess was appointed as state's attorney last summer when Weathersbee retired after 25 years in office. Leitess is being challenged by Republican Wes Adams, a homicide prosecutor who works in Prince George's County. Both are career prosecutors and self-described "trial dogs" who relish a courtroom fight.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2011
Two supporters of Army Pfc. Bradley Manning were barred Monday from the accused WikiLeaker's preliminary military hearing at Fort Meade. The American Civil Liberties Union, meanwhile, said it would appear in federal court Tuesday to challenge the government's "suspicionless search and seizure" of a computer owned by another Manning supporter. Former Lt. Dan Choi, who attended the Article 32 hearing on Saturday and Sunday, tweeted that he was "pressing charges" after he was barred from entering Monday.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Lawyers for the state and gun rights advocates debated in federal court Tuesday about the government's power to hem in the Second Amendment to ward off mass shootings. Spectators crammed into a federal courtroom in downtown Baltimore to watch the hearing regarding bans on the sale or sharing of assault rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. Those provisions, which took effect in October, were among a package of measures enacted to strengthen Maryland's gun laws after 26 people were killed in an elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2011
Within a half-hour of her arrival on the TV set, Kerri O'Dair was transformed from casually clad college student to the picture of a young lawyer, dressed in pearls, a black suit and high heels. While a stylist applied makeup, the 18-year-old studied her notes and prepared for her appearance on "School Court TV. " O'Dair, a student at the Community College of Baltimore County's Dundalk campus, plays the prosecutor in the latest episode of the courtroom drama, which airs this weekend on cable television at Comcast 45.2 or Fios 45.6.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2011
Weeks after his office and home were raided by federal agents, attorney Stanley Needleman is in trouble again — this time for allegedly stealing a judicial clerk's school textbook from a Baltimore County courtroom. Needleman, 68, has been charged with one count of theft under $100 after police say a check of court surveillance cameras showed him on May 9 flipping through the textbook, "Understanding White Collar Crime," walking away with it and resuming his spot behind the defense table to represent a client.
NEWS
By Christopher Neely, Capital News Service | October 30, 2013
The judge in the ongoing trial of a the man accused of sexually abusing female students at the Maryland School for the Deaf implemented an uncommon rule in the courtroom Tuesday. After the jury was finalized and prior to opening statements, Judge William V. Tucker of the Circuit Court for Howard County forbade any sign language communication by people in the courtroom, either between spectators or between spectators and trial participants. The only exception was for the four official courtroom interpreters and those communicating to the interpreters.  Speaking to members of the audience, he also said "facial gestures to any witnesses or participants" were forbidden during the trial, threatening to remove anyone who violated the temporary rule.  The rule was initiated due to the number of key players in the case against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III who are deaf, including the defendant, victims and some witnesses.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff Writer | April 25, 1995
As the clock edges toward 3 p.m. on Day 12 of a drug-conspiracy trial in a Baltimore courtroom, you can see which way some jurors are leaning. Unfortunately, it's not toward a verdict.Heads droop, eyelids flutter closed, mouths fall unprettily open. Several alternate jurors slump in the same direction, like windblown trees. Sleep has stolen upon the scene -- invited by stomachs digesting lunch, the dizzying warmth of the day and a federal agent's explanation of wiretapping technicalities.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | March 5, 1995
My mother calls her "Marcia," and talks about her with the same familiarity she uses to catch me up on the doings of the daughter of an old neighbor.As in: "Did you see Marcia's hair is different?"Like many immersed in the spectacle of the O. J. Simpson trial, my mother is talking about prosecutor Marcia Clark. It is "F. Lee Bailey" and "Johnnie Cochran" and "Robert Shapiro." But for the state's lead lawyer, it is "Marcia."Like everyone else, my mother comments on her style and her suits, and wonders how she's managing her two little kids during the trial.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1995
A state judicial disciplinary panel issued a stinging public reprimand yesterday to a Montgomery County judge for refusing to evacuate his courtroom during a courthouse fire in 1992.But the Commission on Judicial Disabilities held off on deciding whether to punish District Judge Henry J. Monahan on charges that he had sex with a prostitute in his chambers in 1994.Judge Monahan's decision not to evacuate his second-floor courtroom in Rockville on Sept. 24, 1992, was "unjustified, unreasonable," violated fire codes and "could have posed a danger to the welfare and safety of everyone in his courtroom," the panel said in a reprimand issued yesterday.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
As he walked into the Atlantic County, N.J., courthouse for his arraignment on assault charges, Ravens running back Ray Rice was followed by television cameras. Inside was no relief from their lenses, either, with cameras rolling and photographers snapping pictures as the All-Pro pleaded not guilty. That would not have been the case had Rice's arrest occurred in Maryland, which has a complete ban on photography and recording in its criminal courts. There are exceptions for civil trials, and oral arguments in the Court of Appeals are broadcast live on the Internet.
NEWS
November 25, 2013
HCC Actors Guild will present "Fairytale Courtroom" Dec. 6 to 8 and 13 to 15 at the Blackbox Theatre in Joppa Hall on the Harford Community College campus. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. on Dec 6, 7, 13 and 14; 11 a.m. on Dec. 7 and 14; and 3 p.m. on Dec. 8 and 15. The Big Bad Wolf and the Wicked Witch have been frolicking from fairy tale to fairy tale, wreaking havoc as they try to prevent anyone from living happily ever after. The time has come for them to stand trial for their destructive deeds.
NEWS
By Christopher Neely, Capital News Service | October 30, 2013
The judge in the ongoing trial of a the man accused of sexually abusing female students at the Maryland School for the Deaf implemented an uncommon rule in the courtroom Tuesday. After the jury was finalized and prior to opening statements, Judge William V. Tucker of the Circuit Court for Howard County forbade any sign language communication by people in the courtroom, either between spectators or between spectators and trial participants. The only exception was for the four official courtroom interpreters and those communicating to the interpreters.  Speaking to members of the audience, he also said "facial gestures to any witnesses or participants" were forbidden during the trial, threatening to remove anyone who violated the temporary rule.  The rule was initiated due to the number of key players in the case against Clarence Cepheus Taylor III who are deaf, including the defendant, victims and some witnesses.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The disagreement between Mary Ellen Barbera and Glenn T. Harrell Jr. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but that didn't stop them from meeting for lunch in Washington after oral arguments in the case. Barbera and Harrell, both judges on Maryland's highest court, were on opposite sides of a hard-fought case over the collection of DNA from suspects arrested for violent crimes. Harrell wrote the majority opinion striking down the practice; Barbera criticized his reasoning in a dissent.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
Joseph A. Miklasz, a trial attorney who practiced in Glen Burnie and was a wine collector, died of cancer Sunday at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 71 and lived in Crownsville. Born in Baltimore, he was raised in Severn and in East Baltimore, where he lived with an aunt on Gough Street. His father, Joseph Miklasz, owned a combined grocery store, post office and filling station in Severn. His mother, Marie "Mamie" Miklasz, ran the operation. After attending St. Michael's School in Butchers Hill, he was a 1960 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School, where he wrestled.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2012
A Baltimore County judge has agreed to a five-day unpaid suspension, admitting that he was wrong to summarily find 28 people in contempt for courtroom disruptions — including two dozen fined and threatened with jail time after their cellphones sounded in his courtroom. District Judge Norman Stone III also will be on administrative probation for two years. Maryland's top court signed off late Friday on the agreement between Stone, 54, and the Commission on Judicial Disabilities.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | March 30, 1994
The General Assembly may soon lift the ban on cameras in Maryland's criminal courts, at last allowing television's all-seeing eye to scan the occasional scenes of high drama there as in the criminal courtrooms of all but three other states.Maybe this is progress. And maybe it isn't.Putting TV cameras in Maryland's criminal courts would push ever closer to extinction one of the few exemplars of refinement in such proceedings: the courtroom artist.Cameras were not always banned from courtrooms of Maryland or elsewhere.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | October 11, 1994
Washington. -- An angry Judge Lance Ito has called a hearing for November 7 to determine whether he should throw television cameras out of the courtroom during the double-murder trial of O.J. Simpson.Despite the clamorous pile of mail inspired by a few grandstanding print journalists, Judge Ito ought to forget the idea of imposing a television blackout for these reasons:1) The cameras in the courtroom are in no way responsible for the outrageous and erroneous television and newspaper stories that have irritated Judge Ito, Mr. Simpson's defense lawyers and in some cases the prosecution.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2012
World-class ice dancer Genrikh Sretenski is scheduled to make his first court appearance in upstate New York on Friday morning on sex abuse and related charges stemming from allegations from last year. Sretenski, 50, is expected to turn himself in to New York State police about 8 a.m. Friday and is due to be arraigned at 11 a.m. before Essex County Judge Richard B. Meyer, when bail will be set, said Sretenski's attorney, Terence L. Kindlon. Kindlon said his client maintains his innocence and will plead not guilty.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
A state senator from Baltimore County is pushing to oust a district judge accused this week of mistreating a White Marsh woman who was seeking a restraining order in a domestic violence case. District Judge Bruce S. Lamdin will not hear any cases until an investigation into his statements is complete, said Terri Bolling, a spokeswoman for the Maryland court system. "He's an absolute disgrace to the bench," said State Sen. Jim Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, who said he has had constituents complain to him about Lamdin.
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