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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,Boston Globe | May 21, 1995
Recently, I vowed never again to muse on Courtney Love in this column. The punky grunge diva has been iconized by every popular magazine this side of Seattle since she became a power widow. There was nothing left to say. OK, but I can't resist an angelic Miss World on the cover of June's Vanity Fair, the same magazine that accused her of shooting heroin when pregnant with daughter Frances Bean.Strangely, the new VF contains not a single mention of the 1992 article, which Ms. Love has viciously and repeatedly attacked as untrue, claiming it robbed her of all her happiness.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun reporter | August 4, 2007
Will she go, go, go to Baltimore? The hard-partying Grammy Award-winning Amy Winehouse is scheduled to appear today at the Virgin Festival at Baltimore's Pimlico Race Course. Winehouse -- who wrote the contagious "Rehab" -- is penciled in for 2:10 p.m. on the North Stage. "Amy is looking forward to performing in Baltimore," says her publicist, Tracey Miller. Still, fans might be wondering if Winehouse will perform, given recent concert cancellations. In March, the British pop diva canceled two shows in London "owing to unforeseeable circumstances," her Web site said.
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By Michael Saunders and Michael Saunders,The Boston Globe | August 7, 1995
All images of Courtney Love fracture and diverge, as if her persona is projected through a shattered lens. There is no one picture of Ms. Love as a person, just one truth about her as a public figure: She is the most-hated rock star in the country.To millions, she is the tempestuous leader of the band Hole, a foul-mouthed singer with a mean streak who slugs other performers and wallops unlucky fans with her guitar.To some she is the avatar of a rock goddess, snarling lips smeared blood-red like those of Kali, a Hindu deity who can be either destructive or charitable.
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By RAFER GUZMAN and RAFER GUZMAN,NEWSDAY | April 9, 2006
Quick: Hum a tune from Pete Doherty's band Babyshambles. Can't do it? How about one from his better-known band, the Libertines? Can't do that either? Then answer this question: Why do so many people know who Pete Doherty is? For those who don't read the gossip pages, Doherty is a British rock guitarist and singer whose rowdy band the Libertines injected a little life into the music world a few years ago. "Injected" may be a poor choice of words, given Doherty's history with heroin. In England, where rock fans love bad behavior, Doherty's habit made him semilegendary: He got thrown out of his band and burgled a band mate's apartment.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 11, 1998
The engine that drives "Kurt & Courtney," the new documentary by Nick Broomfield, is the Internet-floated rumor that Kurt Cobain, the lead singer for the influential alternative rock band Nirvana, did not commit suicide in Seattle in 1994 but was murdered by his wife, Courtney Love.Maybe it's because its engine is so compromised -- so encrusted with conjecture, so clogged with hearsay and bad faith -- that "Kurt & Courtney" sputters and eventually konks out so painfully. Broomfield concludes that there is no basis for the rumor, but only after taking viewers through a torturous series of interviews with people in varying degrees of greed- or drug-induced stupor.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | March 30, 1997
The massive Howard Stern media blitz is over, leaving in its wake remnant thoughts about what New Yorker writer David Remnick cleverly calls "over-the-counter counterculture," or the mainstreaming of edginess. Does a pop phenomenon -- Howard Stern, alternative rock, Courtney Love, the nodding-out-on-heroin look, "independent" movie-making -- remain edgy once it has been mass-packaged and presold? And if a healthy, lip-jobbed Courtney Love is making Oscar presentations, and Howard Stern has topped the box-office list, who will become the new rebels?
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 8, 1998
There's no doubt that Courtney Love has undergone one of the entertainment industry's most remarkable makeovers.Five years ago, it was hard to find anyone who had anything good to say about her. Even though she had her own band, Hole, she was criticized within the alternarock world as an opportunist who leeched off the fame of husband Kurt Cobain. She was denounced in Vanity Fair as a drug addict and unfit mother, and portrayed in other profiles as a vengeful egomaniac.Even after Cobain's suicide in 1994, weeks before the release of Hole's last album, "Live Through This," Love got little slack.
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By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | January 26, 1997
Anyone who watched the Golden Globes Sunday couldn't miss the countless camera pans of an ever-smiling new actress with a polite blond hairdo and rubbery Hollywood lips. Her name is Courtney Love, and, just in time to survive the media's Death of Grunge pronouncements, she is riding a massive career make-over, suddenly a distant cousin to the reckless bigmouth known for her blood-red lipstick and sloppy kinder-whore stylings. She's become Blanche to her former Baby Jane.Is Love's transformation from addict-widow to movie star the decade's greatest story of triumph?
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By Phoebe Flowers and Phoebe Flowers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 26, 1999
It's New Year's Eve 1981. Do you know where the point is?If you're casting director-turned-filmmaker Risa Bramon Garcia, the answer is probably no. Garcia, who has cast everything from "Fatal Attraction" to almost every Oliver Stone movie, has thrown together a clawing litter of Hot Young Stars -- Christina Ricci, Paul Rudd, Jay Mohr, Janeane Garofalo, Courtney Love and Ben and Casey Affleck -- for "200 Cigarettes." Elvis Costello even plays himself.But all the staggeringly hip cast serves to do is bog things down.
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By Gene Stout and Gene Stout,Seattle Post-Intelligencer | July 5, 1995
There's no rest for grunge-rock martyrs, as Courtney Love has discovered. She can't find a suitable place to bury the ashes of her late husband, Kurt Cobain, lead singer of Nirvana.Of the two Seattle cemeteries she has approached, one has turned her down, citing security concerns, and the other wants at least $100,000 a year to cover the costs of full-time security to protect the cemetery and grave site. That's in addition to a $75,000 tombstone the cemetery wants her to buy."I don't have that kind of money, and Kurt didn't have that kind of money," said Ms. Love, who sings for the band Hole.
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By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2004
As might be expected of a notoriously reclusive singer-songwriter, PJ Harvey has repeatedly warned us against looking at her songs as autobiographical. But she writes and sings with such convincing character and detail that it's hard to separate the writer from the emotional sieges she describes. In "Shame," one of the key songs on Uh Huh Her, Harvey's first album in four years, she tells of a woman so immobilized by failed relationships that she doesn't even know where to put the blame for what seems certain to go wrong in the latest one. Against a spare, bluesy backdrop, she explains her devotion and dilemma: And if you tell a lie I still would take the blame And if you pass me by It's such a shame, shame, shame.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 27, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 With Wilco's lead singer Jeff Tweedy providing low-key passion and intransigence, and director Sam Jones finding the sweaty visual poetry of lived-in city spaces, I Am Trying to Break Your Heart is one documentary that goes through major growth spurts every half hour. This picture is jagged and exciting; it tells several plots imperfectly, yet makes them add up to a great American story about integrity challenged and triumphant. I Am Trying to Break Your Heart starts with Wilco's members laying down tracks for Yankee Hotel Foxtrot, thrilled by the prospect of producing their own CD with the Reprise label's money and no interference.
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By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 15, 2000
WASHINGTON - Saying there is no political force more powerful than a mother's wrath, hundreds of thousands of mothers made an emotional call yesterday for tighter gun laws to help protect their children. At times with rage and tears, the mothers promised that this event would be more than a one-day outcry on a sunny Mother's Day afternoon. They pledged to build a grass-roots movement for tough new gun laws that would continue its work in their hometowns and at the polls. "It does my heart good to look out and see all these people -- all with the same goal, all with so much voting power," said Maisha Enaharo, 48, a mother from Rochester, N.Y., as she stared into a sea of signs and strollers.
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By Phoebe Flowers and Phoebe Flowers,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 26, 1999
It's New Year's Eve 1981. Do you know where the point is?If you're casting director-turned-filmmaker Risa Bramon Garcia, the answer is probably no. Garcia, who has cast everything from "Fatal Attraction" to almost every Oliver Stone movie, has thrown together a clawing litter of Hot Young Stars -- Christina Ricci, Paul Rudd, Jay Mohr, Janeane Garofalo, Courtney Love and Ben and Casey Affleck -- for "200 Cigarettes." Elvis Costello even plays himself.But all the staggeringly hip cast serves to do is bog things down.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 11, 1998
The engine that drives "Kurt & Courtney," the new documentary by Nick Broomfield, is the Internet-floated rumor that Kurt Cobain, the lead singer for the influential alternative rock band Nirvana, did not commit suicide in Seattle in 1994 but was murdered by his wife, Courtney Love.Maybe it's because its engine is so compromised -- so encrusted with conjecture, so clogged with hearsay and bad faith -- that "Kurt & Courtney" sputters and eventually konks out so painfully. Broomfield concludes that there is no basis for the rumor, but only after taking viewers through a torturous series of interviews with people in varying degrees of greed- or drug-induced stupor.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | September 8, 1998
There's no doubt that Courtney Love has undergone one of the entertainment industry's most remarkable makeovers.Five years ago, it was hard to find anyone who had anything good to say about her. Even though she had her own band, Hole, she was criticized within the alternarock world as an opportunist who leeched off the fame of husband Kurt Cobain. She was denounced in Vanity Fair as a drug addict and unfit mother, and portrayed in other profiles as a vengeful egomaniac.Even after Cobain's suicide in 1994, weeks before the release of Hole's last album, "Live Through This," Love got little slack.
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 17, 1995
Medical reality and medical melodrama are part of a rich Monday mix that includes a not-so-instant replay of "Baseball," a new TV movie and the bloody conclusion of "Texas."* "Profiles in Survival" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Actress Susan Anton narrates this American Cancer Society special, which profiles four cancer survivors -- and the discrimination in employment and health care that some recovering patients face. The show includes a cancer risk quiz, and NewsChannel 2 contributes two short spots to localize the story.
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | November 10, 1996
As the holiday movie season approaches, the magazines are dangling actress Oscar bait from their covers. Nicole Kidman, looking positively embalmed, tips her cleavage to the readers of November's Premiere, promoting both her star turn in Jane Campion's forthcoming "Portrait of a Lady" and the sheer and absolute perfection of her marriage to Tom Cruise. "It doesn't feel like seven years to me at all," she gushes.The underdog nominee may be Kristin Scott Thomas, that British actress from "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "A Handful of Dust" and "Angels and Insects," who's about to appear with Ralph Fiennes in the season's biggest and highest-minded romance, "The English Patient."
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | March 30, 1997
The massive Howard Stern media blitz is over, leaving in its wake remnant thoughts about what New Yorker writer David Remnick cleverly calls "over-the-counter counterculture," or the mainstreaming of edginess. Does a pop phenomenon -- Howard Stern, alternative rock, Courtney Love, the nodding-out-on-heroin look, "independent" movie-making -- remain edgy once it has been mass-packaged and presold? And if a healthy, lip-jobbed Courtney Love is making Oscar presentations, and Howard Stern has topped the box-office list, who will become the new rebels?
NEWS
By Matthew Gilbert and Matthew Gilbert,BOSTON GLOBE | January 26, 1997
Anyone who watched the Golden Globes Sunday couldn't miss the countless camera pans of an ever-smiling new actress with a polite blond hairdo and rubbery Hollywood lips. Her name is Courtney Love, and, just in time to survive the media's Death of Grunge pronouncements, she is riding a massive career make-over, suddenly a distant cousin to the reckless bigmouth known for her blood-red lipstick and sloppy kinder-whore stylings. She's become Blanche to her former Baby Jane.Is Love's transformation from addict-widow to movie star the decade's greatest story of triumph?
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