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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 11, 2013
The painting of a mural on the north wall of the Harford County Sheriff's Office headquarters is under way in earnest this week. The mural, which is being paid for by the town of Bel Air, will overlook the town's Main Street parking lot, built last year after the BB&T Bank building that stood on the site was acquired by the town and demolished. That opened up the bare wall of the sheriff's headquarters, which had butted against the bank building. The mural will depict the adjoining courthouse square as it looked prior to the 1950s, when a house stood on the site of the sheriff's building, in front of the old jail which is still standing.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 11, 2013
The painting of a mural on the north wall of the Harford County Sheriff's Office headquarters is under way in earnest this week. The mural, which is being paid for by the town of Bel Air, will overlook the town's Main Street parking lot, built last year after the BB&T Bank building that stood on the site was acquired by the town and demolished. That opened up the bare wall of the sheriff's headquarters, which had butted against the bank building. The mural will depict the adjoining courthouse square as it looked prior to the 1950s, when a house stood on the site of the sheriff's building, in front of the old jail which is still standing.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 27, 2006
Adriana Chalfont waited in a line of children yesterday at the LatinoFest in Towson for a face painting or maybe a temporary tattoo. She danced barefoot to mariachi music, sampled savory fare, shopped for imported wares and, in true bipartisan fashion, attached to her bright red outfit every political campaign sticker offered to her. "I love festivals, and I go to talk to people," said the 50-year-old Baltimore resident. "We all have to celebrate who we are and how we are all connected.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Lady Baltimore has withstood much in 189 years perched overlooking Courthouse Square. She has lost both of her arms over the decades — one of them, holding high a wreath that signifies service to the republic, was sheared off by a gust of wind in January 1938, shattering on the pavement. And though it may be hard to tell from the street 52 feet below, wind, rain, snow, hail and pollution have dissolved much of the marble statue's eyes, nose and ears. But a new effort will finally give Lady Baltimore a new home — for her own good.
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | September 8, 1996
One after another, they gather near the Stone County courthouse square in Mountain View, Ark.An elderly woman dressed in denim. A man whose weathered face is all but hidden beneath a wide-brimmed cowboy hat. A young boy in shorts and T-shirt. Dozens more.They come from their churches and homes on this early Sunday afternoon, bringing guitars and fiddles and mandolins and banjos and a deep respect for song and tradition.They sit in a circle surrounded by family and friends. They begin to play.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 30, 1995
From The Sun July 30-Aug. 5, 1845* July 31: We learn that Mr. Thos. Owings of Fairhaven, Anne Arundel County, on Thursday last, took at one haul of the seine upwards of 100 black drum fish, averaging 60 1bs. each.* Aug. 5: F. Gardinier, corner of Second and Frederick streets, is ready to dress feathers at all times and return them the same day.From The Sun July 30-Aug. 5, 1895* July 30: The addition of Clifton to the parks of Baltimore will give the northeastern section what in time will prove to be one of the most attractive of public pleasure grounds.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Nellie Mitchell, 98, had an appointment with her eye doctor yesterday, so she didn't go to the stand where she sells newspapers on the courthouse square in Mountain Home, Ark. No matter. She learned that she now can collect $1 million, after a little help from the Supreme Court.The court issued a brief order here removing a legal hold on a jury verdict she had won for invasion of her privacy by a supermarket tabloid when it used her picture to illustrate a story it made up about a 101-year-old pregnant newspaper carrier in Australia.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
After 53 years, you'd think the Annapolis Rotary Club Crab Feast would be hard-pressed to improve on its formula of beer, steamed corn and all the spice-coated crabs you can dissect and devour.But this year, 2,500-plus people gathered at sunset in the shadows of the concrete bleachers at the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium experienced a twist in crab feasting -- gut-bustingly fat crabs.In years past, organizers ordered bushels of the cheaper, medium-size crabs. There were no complaints.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2005
Edna Howard "Eddie" Devereux, a retired teacher whose volunteer work spanned five decades, died in her sleep Wednesday at the Broadmead Retirement Community, where she had lived since 1990. The former Ruxton resident was 97. Born Edna Burnside in Marshall, Ill., she moved to Washington, where her father was a physician in the Army. She put herself through the University of Maryland, College Park, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1929. She then became a buyer for the old Frank R. Jelleff Co., a department store in the District of Columbia.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
As Carroll draws more and more new residents, it also attracts an ever-larger number of visitors.No one knows that better than the increasingly busy Office of Tourism, which prepares tour packages and aids visitors in orchestrating their excursions.In preparing bus tours, bike tours or walking tours, the office works hard to see that natives as well as visitors can discover all ofCarroll County's well-known and not so well-known attractions.The most popular tour, said Joan Meekins, tourism program administrator, is a ride on a vintage railway car.More than 900 people on 21 rail tours see the county annually.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | August 27, 2006
Adriana Chalfont waited in a line of children yesterday at the LatinoFest in Towson for a face painting or maybe a temporary tattoo. She danced barefoot to mariachi music, sampled savory fare, shopped for imported wares and, in true bipartisan fashion, attached to her bright red outfit every political campaign sticker offered to her. "I love festivals, and I go to talk to people," said the 50-year-old Baltimore resident. "We all have to celebrate who we are and how we are all connected.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2005
Edna Howard "Eddie" Devereux, a retired teacher whose volunteer work spanned five decades, died in her sleep Wednesday at the Broadmead Retirement Community, where she had lived since 1990. The former Ruxton resident was 97. Born Edna Burnside in Marshall, Ill., she moved to Washington, where her father was a physician in the Army. She put herself through the University of Maryland, College Park, where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1929. She then became a buyer for the old Frank R. Jelleff Co., a department store in the District of Columbia.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 7, 1999
After 53 years, you'd think the Annapolis Rotary Club Crab Feast would be hard-pressed to improve on its formula of beer, steamed corn and all the spice-coated crabs you can dissect and devour.But this year, 2,500-plus people gathered at sunset in the shadows of the concrete bleachers at the Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium experienced a twist in crab feasting -- gut-bustingly fat crabs.In years past, organizers ordered bushels of the cheaper, medium-size crabs. There were no complaints.
FEATURES
By Harry Shattuck and Harry Shattuck,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | September 8, 1996
One after another, they gather near the Stone County courthouse square in Mountain View, Ark.An elderly woman dressed in denim. A man whose weathered face is all but hidden beneath a wide-brimmed cowboy hat. A young boy in shorts and T-shirt. Dozens more.They come from their churches and homes on this early Sunday afternoon, bringing guitars and fiddles and mandolins and banjos and a deep respect for song and tradition.They sit in a circle surrounded by family and friends. They begin to play.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 30, 1995
From The Sun July 30-Aug. 5, 1845* July 31: We learn that Mr. Thos. Owings of Fairhaven, Anne Arundel County, on Thursday last, took at one haul of the seine upwards of 100 black drum fish, averaging 60 1bs. each.* Aug. 5: F. Gardinier, corner of Second and Frederick streets, is ready to dress feathers at all times and return them the same day.From The Sun July 30-Aug. 5, 1895* July 30: The addition of Clifton to the parks of Baltimore will give the northeastern section what in time will prove to be one of the most attractive of public pleasure grounds.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | October 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Nellie Mitchell, 98, had an appointment with her eye doctor yesterday, so she didn't go to the stand where she sells newspapers on the courthouse square in Mountain Home, Ark. No matter. She learned that she now can collect $1 million, after a little help from the Supreme Court.The court issued a brief order here removing a legal hold on a jury verdict she had won for invasion of her privacy by a supermarket tabloid when it used her picture to illustrate a story it made up about a 101-year-old pregnant newspaper carrier in Australia.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2012
Lady Baltimore has withstood much in 189 years perched overlooking Courthouse Square. She has lost both of her arms over the decades — one of them, holding high a wreath that signifies service to the republic, was sheared off by a gust of wind in January 1938, shattering on the pavement. And though it may be hard to tell from the street 52 feet below, wind, rain, snow, hail and pollution have dissolved much of the marble statue's eyes, nose and ears. But a new effort will finally give Lady Baltimore a new home — for her own good.
NEWS
July 18, 2002
The National Trust for Historic Preservation named the city of Frederick yesterday to its annual list of "America's Dozen Distinctive Destinations." In recognizing Frederick, the organization singled out its collection of Federal, Georgian and Victorian buildings and the Courthouse Square; Rose Hill Manor Children's Museum, which focuses on 19th-century life; and Baker Park, a 44-acre park with recreational trails and an amphitheater used for free performances...
NEWS
May 5, 1991
As Carroll draws more and more new residents, it also attracts an ever-larger number of visitors.No one knows that better than the increasingly busy Office of Tourism, which prepares tour packages and aids visitors in orchestrating their excursions.In preparing bus tours, bike tours or walking tours, the office works hard to see that natives as well as visitors can discover all ofCarroll County's well-known and not so well-known attractions.The most popular tour, said Joan Meekins, tourism program administrator, is a ride on a vintage railway car.More than 900 people on 21 rail tours see the county annually.
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