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By Steve Weinstein and Steve Weinstein,Special to The Sun | August 20, 1995
She made the cover of Rolling Stone with her pals from television. People magazine chose her for the cover of its "50 Most Beautiful People in the World" issue. Her show -- on which no less an expert than "Cheers" maestro and quintessential sitcom director James Burrows said she acts as the hub -- is one of the biggest hits on television, ranking No. 1 for the first time the week of June 5.All this notoriety after virtually disappearing from the limelight more than five years earlier. What gives?
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun television critic | January 2, 2007
Not long ago, if a network or cable channel scheduled the premiere of a new TV series in winter -- rather than the fall -- it was tantamount to a kiss of death. But these days, TV executives frequently save their top-draw fare -- think Fox's American Idol and 24 -- for what's being called television's "second season." The strategy, which was pioneered by HBO and honed in recent years by Fox, is a direct response to the revved-up, all-year-round competition catalyzed by aggressive cable programming and the demands of an audience armed with new digital viewing options such as TiVo.
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By Sandy Coleman and Sandy Coleman,BOSTON GLOBE | May 12, 1996
As if they haven't done enough by showing up in soda commercials, in badly imitated hairstyles and in movies, the stars of NBC's "Friends" show up everywhere this month in magazines.There is David Schwimmer in Vogue talking about how he got from television to film. Courteney Cox is in Redbook denying the rumors that she is bulimic and as neurotic as her TV character. Lisa Kudrow shows off her style in Elle. And the actress who plays the character with the haircut everyone is copying shows up by way of a 1971 photo of actor David Cassidy (ex-"Partridge Family" member)
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By DAVID ZURAWIK | November 13, 2005
FRIENDS - THE ONE WITH ALL TEN SEASONS -- Warner Home Video / $299.98 / Remember the pilot? Ross (David Schwimmer) just found out his wife of four years is a lesbian and is leaving him for another woman. Rachel (Jennifer Aniston) just left her fiancM-i standing at the altar of a $40,000 wedding. Monica (Courteney Cox) wonders why she's a "beacon for men with severe emotional problems." And Chandler (Matthew Perry) feels compelled to share every detail of his dreams, which are Freudian feasts of sexual insecurities and confusions.
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 31, 1995
NBC will use its hit show "Friends" to keep millions of viewers watching the network after the Super Bowl Jan. 28.In a special two-parter, Jean-Claude Van Damme, Brooke Shields and singer Chris Isaak will guest-star on TV's No. 3-rated series. And NBC is negotiating with Julia Roberts to appear in the episodes, shot this month. If she signs on, "Friends" would re-shoot.Ms. Shields plays a wacko fan who shows up at Joey's (Matt LeBlanc) place after he lands a role on "Days of Our Lives." Phoebe (Lisa Kudrow)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 23, 2005
Jokes about art-school artiness don't make an art movie any less arty. In the case of the failed thriller November, they make it doubly self-conscious. This generally humorless tale of a photographer-teacher (Courteney Cox) who freaks out when she witnesses the convenience-store killing of her boyfriend (James LeGros) is like an undergraduate thesis film gone wrong. It's an existential mystery told in a splintered post-Memento style that may affect you like Chinese water torture. It replays the same events from the heroine's point of view while she's at different mental states from "denial" to "acceptance."
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH AND ANNIE LINSKEY and CHRIS KALTENBACH AND ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
It may have been the most aptly named sitcom ever. When Friends airs its last original episode tonight at 8, a particularly warm relationship of some 10 years' standing between the show and as many as 28 million TV viewers will end -- or, at least, shift into reruns. While the show's passing is not being lamented as much as other shows that truly advanced the art of the sitcom, its absence will leave a void just the same. For if Friends was never as edgy as Seinfield, or as pioneering as I Love Lucy, or as sophosticated as The Dick Van Dyke Show, it was two things that were almost as important: Reliably funny.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1995
A movie that changed my life, a chance to chart the career of Courteney Cox, ice-skating nannies and a lifetime achievement award for Mr. Rourke of "Fantasy Island." For the week between Christmas and New Year's, a week that's usually the deadest of the year, this isn't a bad lineup at all.* "Disney's Hits on Ice" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Katarina Witt as Mary Poppins? I knew Great Britain's most famous nanny could fly, but ice skate? Now that's talent. CBS.* "Friends" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11)
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
It speaks volumes when: a) a movie has an inane title such as "See Spot Run" and b) David Arquette is its main draw. If you're deducing that it's best to pass on this film, congratulations! You've just won an evening that wasn't wasted on 95 minutes of flat jokes, cheap dog poop humor and the mostly unfunny Arquette. Arquette - who was good in "Never Been Kissed" but is best known for his real-life role of Mr. Courteney Cox - stars as Gordon Smith, an immature Seattle mail carrier who is infatuated with his pretty neighbor Stephanie.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
"Scream 2" is not going to win any converts, but it's sure going to keep the faithful happy.Like its predecessor, 1996's genre-invigorating and mega-successful "Scream," the film is so self-conscious that it's as much pop-culture quiz as slasher movie. The "Scream" films not only follow horror conventions, they make sure you know they're following those conventions; they're slasher movies starring people who act like they know they're in a slasher movie and not in anything resembling the real world.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 23, 2005
Jokes about art-school artiness don't make an art movie any less arty. In the case of the failed thriller November, they make it doubly self-conscious. This generally humorless tale of a photographer-teacher (Courteney Cox) who freaks out when she witnesses the convenience-store killing of her boyfriend (James LeGros) is like an undergraduate thesis film gone wrong. It's an existential mystery told in a splintered post-Memento style that may affect you like Chinese water torture. It replays the same events from the heroine's point of view while she's at different mental states from "denial" to "acceptance."
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH AND ANNIE LINSKEY and CHRIS KALTENBACH AND ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2004
It may have been the most aptly named sitcom ever. When Friends airs its last original episode tonight at 8, a particularly warm relationship of some 10 years' standing between the show and as many as 28 million TV viewers will end -- or, at least, shift into reruns. While the show's passing is not being lamented as much as other shows that truly advanced the art of the sitcom, its absence will leave a void just the same. For if Friends was never as edgy as Seinfield, or as pioneering as I Love Lucy, or as sophosticated as The Dick Van Dyke Show, it was two things that were almost as important: Reliably funny.
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By HARTFORD COURANT | June 30, 2001
Hollywood is getting fat. With increasing frequency, actors on screens big and small are slipping into fat suits for laughs. Comedian Martin Short is the latest actor to weigh in. Short's half-hour show "Primetime Glick" had its premiere on Comedy Central last week. With the help of makeup and a fat suit, Short transforms into celebrity interviewer Jiminy Glick, the overweight, jolly and clueless host of a fictitious talk show. "What Marty wears is a classic fat suit," said Carolee Fisher, "Primetime Glick" costume designer.
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By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2001
It speaks volumes when: a) a movie has an inane title such as "See Spot Run" and b) David Arquette is its main draw. If you're deducing that it's best to pass on this film, congratulations! You've just won an evening that wasn't wasted on 95 minutes of flat jokes, cheap dog poop humor and the mostly unfunny Arquette. Arquette - who was good in "Never Been Kissed" but is best known for his real-life role of Mr. Courteney Cox - stars as Gordon Smith, an immature Seattle mail carrier who is infatuated with his pretty neighbor Stephanie.
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By THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 18, 1999
There is always a little suffering on that rocky runway toward beauty.The latest fashion ripple? The bare leg. Absolutely nude. No fair cheating with sheer or opaque nylons. We're talking no stockings. No security blanket to mask your ghostly gams or shield your razor-nicked knee.We're talking skin. Shivering skin."It was freezing out today, and I had on a leather skirt and leather boots, but I had no stockings. I was freezing! And I thought: This is kinda nuts. But hey, this is the look," said Lauren Ezersky, who, as fashion and beauty reporter for Paper magazine in New York, has observed a growing number of women going stockingless.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 12, 1997
"Scream 2" is not going to win any converts, but it's sure going to keep the faithful happy.Like its predecessor, 1996's genre-invigorating and mega-successful "Scream," the film is so self-conscious that it's as much pop-culture quiz as slasher movie. The "Scream" films not only follow horror conventions, they make sure you know they're following those conventions; they're slasher movies starring people who act like they know they're in a slasher movie and not in anything resembling the real world.
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | January 11, 1992
CBS's "Battling for Baby," which airs tomorrow night at 9 (Channel 11), is two parts frothy fluff, one part hateful excoriation working mothers."Baby" has an old-fashioned comic approach and cast -- Suzanne Pleshette and Debbie Reynolds -- but its backlash politics put it on the cutting edge. This is is a nasty, hypocritical movie, its silly surface obscuring a vicious core.Ms. Pleshette is the concert pianist who missed her baby's early years, thanks to her career, and is now paying the price: She's brittle and insecure, and her daughter calls her by her first name.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 20, 1996
Indeed, "Scream" is better than the average slasher film, as its advertisers insist. And, indeed, it is probably Wes Craven's best film, as they also insist. But that is a little like saying the pimple on the left side of your nose is "better" than the pimple on the right side. Or that the 1995 audit was "better" than the 1994 audit. Or that Yogi is merely "better" than the average bear.Mostly, it's the same old things: goblins in masks chasing teen-agers and the occasional grown-up through time and space without regard to logic, catching them and doing the dirty deed with six inches of cold steel.
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By Tamara Ikenberg and Tamara Ikenberg,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
His fans have designed a church for him, but Joe Straczynski is not a god.Church of Joe Home Page* http: //www.midwinter.com/lurk/lurker.html* http: //www.thestation.com/ (this is the official fan-club page)* http: //www.babylon5.com/L For a news group moderated by J. Michael Straczynski, go to:* rec.arts.sf.tv.babylon5.moderatedThe shows prime-time forgotHere's a sample of some recent sci-fi and fantasy shows that dared to go where TV had never gone before, and lost the dare.* "The Sixth Sense"Paranormal psychology leads to wacky adventuresESPremiere: January 1972Signal cut off: December 1972* "Kolchak: The Night Stalker"Crime reporter encounters supernatural villains, including vampiresFirst Blood: September 1974Dying Breath: August 1975* "Quark"Sci-fi parody featuring intergalactic garbage-manFirst sighting: February 1978In the trash: April 1978* "Battlestar Galactica"Big budget "Star Wars" rip-offBlast off: September 1978Abort mission: August 1980* "Buck Rogers in the 25th Century"Tongue-in-cheek revival of '50s series, based on comic book characterLaunched: September 1979Lost: April 1981* "V"Aliens as allegory for NazisLiftoff: October 1984Crash landing: July 1985* "Amazing Stories"Anthology dealing with domestic pets and otherworldly occurrencesFirst howl: September 1985In the doghouse: May 1987* "Misfits of Science"Teen mutants (including Courteney Cox)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 19, 1997
The King assassination takes center stage on ABC tonight."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Monica (Courteney Cox) runs into ex-boyfriend Richard (Tom Selleck) at the video store. Can passion be renewed? (If you saw this episode when it first aired back in January, don't spoil it for everyone else by giving away the ending.) NBC."Charlie Rose" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Cal Ripken Jr. sits down for a chat about things Baltimore, things baseball and things literate.
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