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NEWS
By Barbara Pash | July 31, 2014
In the next few months, it will be a snap to find entertainment news and venues in Towson thanks to the Towson Chamber of Commerce. The chamber is designing an online application, a one-stop shop of everything you want to know about what's happening, who's doing it and how to get there in downtown Towson. The application, downloadable for smart phones and android devices, will be free to users and to the businesses, chamber members or not, that will be in it. Brooke Bianchetti, assistant to the chamber executive director, is designing the app. "We expect to launch it in the next two to three months," she said of the approximately $10,000 to $12,000 project.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
An appeals court on Wednesday sanctioned the police's use of genetic material obtained in one investigation to solve other crimes, but agreed with attorneys for a burglar that questions surround the little known practice. Three judges of the Court of Special Appeals upheld the burglary conviction of George Varriale, a homeless Anne Arundel County man, which was based in part on DNA that he had voluntarily given to police to clear himself in a rape investigation . Genetic material obtained by police with consent of a suspect is not subject to the same legal protections as that compelled from people arrested for certain crimes - the profile need not be expunged from law enforcement databases if the suspect is cleared of wrongdoing, for example.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
A Major League Baseball panel's recent decision would rewrite the economics of the relationship between the Orioles and Washington Nationals, diverting tens of millions of dollars in annual profits from the regional television network that primarily benefit the Baltimore team, according to baseball sources. The private decision, made by three club owners selected by Commissioner Bud Selig, would diminish the amount of money the Orioles receive under a 2005 agreement establishing how money from Mid-Atlantic Sports Network is to be divided by the neighboring teams.
NEWS
By Gary J. Katz | July 29, 2014
Two years ago I moved to Baltimore, where the roads are littered with pot holes (and litter) - I should know because I've had to circle them to find parking. Two of my housemates have had their cars broken into, my high taxes make my escrow payments exceed my mortgage, and a train bellows its horn in my neighborhood at all hours of the night. So it surprises me that in my first public request of this city, I am simply asking for it's leaders to do nothing at all. I am a 33-year-old professional, and I am a demographic that every city fights to have.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
In a letter in the Sun, Kelli Kirchner of Cumberland expresses her happiness with the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and seems to believe no one should question or try to change it ( "Why is Mikulski trying to 'fix' the Supreme Court decision?" July 20). Well, I have news for her. As long as we have freedom of speech (as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution), we will always be free to question and try to change (via legislation or constitutional amendment) any decision of any court.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Lawyers for the state and gun rights advocates debated in federal court Tuesday about the government's power to hem in the Second Amendment to ward off mass shootings. Spectators crammed into a federal courtroom in downtown Baltimore to watch the hearing regarding bans on the sale or sharing of assault rifles and magazines capable of holding more than 10 rounds. Those provisions, which took effect in October, were among a package of measures enacted to strengthen Maryland's gun laws after 26 people were killed in an elementary school shooting in Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
On her website, Sen. Barbara Mikulski proclaims that she is joining other senators to introduce a "legislative fix to protect women's health" following the Supreme Court's recent decision in the Hobby Lobby case. Whether you are for abortion or against abortion, whether you think your employer should cover all birth control or not, whether you are a women or a man, this bill should bother you. Why? Because our Founding Fathers created three branches of government to check and balance each other.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The nightclub insurer promised to fight for its clients - its promotional material shows a man socked in the face with a boxing glove. But founder Jeffrey B. Cohen fights everything. He went after competitors, clients, former employees and even neighbors, filing dozens of lawsuits around the country. The Reisterstown man once sought a restraining order to keep a rival company from attending an adult industry convention. Now Cohen, 39, faces the biggest fight of his life - his company, Indemnity Insurance Corp., was seized by regulators, and federal agents said in court documents that he appears to have been plotting to attack a judge.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Before they get a decision in their immigration cases - before they even have a hearing - the tens of thousands of children entering the country illegally will face an increasingly daunting challenge at the heart of a massive backlog in U.S. immigration court: The young immigrants must first find an attorney. Legal groups and immigration experts say the number of lawyers available to represent undocumented children in Maryland and elsewhere is already woefully inadequate to meet the demand - even though many of the most recent border crossers haven't yet begun to enter the court system.
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