Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCourt
IN THE NEWS

Court

NEWS
August 28, 2014
Police departments in Maryland and across the country are weighing the costs and benefits of using unmanned aerial vehicles as aids in the fight against crime. There are still many unanswered questions regarding the new technology's potential impact on citizens' privacy rights as well as safety concerns related to their sharing airspace with civilian and military aircraft. Those issues will all require careful study before drones can be deployed as a widely available law-enforcement tool.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The state's highest court ordered a new trial Wednesday for a former Baltimore police sergeant convicted nearly two decades ago of murdering his young mistress - a ruling that could affect cases that relied on bullet testing used for decades until being debunked. Gina Nueslein, a 22-year-old clerk at a Royal Farms, became entangled with Sgt. James Kulbicki, who was 14 years her senior, in a relationship that soured as she sued him for child support. Twenty years later, Kulbicki has a chance to demonstrate the innocence he has maintained, but Nueslein's family must experience the ordeal of her death again.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 24, 2014
A truism: Almost nobody looks good in his booking photo. That said, the 47th governor of Texas, one James Richard Perry, certainly gave it his best shot when he faced the camera at the Travis County Courthouse last week. The resultant image is ... not terrible. Perry is caught somewhere between a tight smile and an outright grimace, his mien taut with confidence and seriousness of purpose. Gazing on that photo, one cannot help but suspect that a transparently political indictment designed by his Democratic opponents to cripple this presumed presidential aspirant might actually help him instead.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Charles County authorities are investigating an incident in which a retired Circuit Court judge ordered that a unruly defendant be given an electric shock during a court proceeding last month. Paul B. DeWolfe Jr., who heads the state Office of the Public Defender, called Friday for the judge to be banned from hearing cases. "What the judge did here was unconscionable," DeWolfe said in a statement. "The infliction of physical pain to silence a person is unacceptable anywhere, but especially when it is done in a court of law at the direction of the very person whose job it is to protect people's rights.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore Immigration Court, facing an increase in the number of cases involving immigrant children who crossed the border illegally, is expediting reviews to more quickly decide whether the children should be deported, according to attorneys with clients before the court. The so-called "rocket docket," created in response to a directive last month from the Obama administration to fast-track the cases, has meant the children receive initial hearings within 21 days and in some cases are given a matter of weeks, instead of months, to find an attorney.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A 19-year-old man has been charged in a Northwest Baltimore double shooting that injured two men in late July, Baltimore police say. Michael Pickett, 19, of 603 E 38th St., faces attempted murder, assault and weapons charges after Baltimore police say he shot two men sitting in a 2000 Saturn on July 30 in the 5000 block of Gwynn Oak Ave. in Howard Park. Police say a 22-year-old man was shot in the chest and lower back while a 27-year-old man was shot in the right arm. Witnesses identified Pickett as a person of interest in the shooting and he was arrested after a photo lineup, detectives wrote in charging documents.
NEWS
August 17, 2014
The most popular rifle in America is the AR-15, which looks like M-16 but does not operate like one. Maryland's legislature banned the look in spite of fact that the function never matched ( "Federal judge upholds assault rifle ban," Aug. 12). Science and records say assault rifles are seldom involved in crime. Research and common sense says good guys with guns save lives. While cops are usually good guys, their failure rate is high. Maryland put almost 60 bad cops in jail over the last two years.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
The Orioles' dispute with Major League Baseball over television rights fees casts the franchise in a familiar role as a challenger to the baseball establishment. About a decade ago, the Orioles opposed the proposed relocation of the Montreal Expos to Washington, a city that had been exclusive Orioles television and marketing territory since 1972, when the Senators moved to Dallas and became the Texas Rangers. After bruising negotiations and the threat of litigation by the Baltimore team, baseball reached an agreement with the Orioles giving the club control of the regional television network it shares with the Nationals as compensation for the loss of territory.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ordered an absentee Baltimore landlord to clean up about 50 blighted properties within 90 days, the first ruling since a state law was amended two years ago to make it easier for community groups to sue the owners of problem properties. Judge Pamela J. White found that 49 properties owned by Scott Wizig and corporate affiliates represented legal nuisances, with "unsafe and uninhabitable" conditions that have not been fixed despite requests by community groups and notices of violations of the building code.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The Baltimore Orioles took an early lead in the court battle against the Washington Nationals and Major League Baseball over television rights fees from the teams' shared regional sports network. A New York court temporarily blocked a recent Major League Baseball decision that would have diverted tens of millions of dollars in profits from the regional network MASN that flow primarily to the Orioles. The Orioles say that money is critical to maintaining competitiveness and affording quality players.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.