Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCourt
IN THE NEWS

Court

NEWS
April 8, 2014
I was pleased to read The Sun's editorial against the Supreme Court's wrongheaded decision in McCutcheon v. FEC ( "A win for the billionaires," April 6). I'm to hoping that this decision serves as a spark for change. The court's decision to eliminate federal limits on the total amount of money that mega-donors can contribute during an election cycle empowers a tiny group of fewer than 3,000 elite donors to spend an additional billion dollars in our elections through 2020. This isn't the way it should be. In our democracy, the size of your wallet shouldn't determine the strength of your voice in our political system.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
A Pasadena man pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to tipping off a major cocaine dealer that his phone was being monitored after learning about the tap from a local court official. Last June, Joshua Ferguson, 34, found out from a friend who worked at the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that authorities were conducting a wiretap investigation, and the next day called one of the targets of the investigation to warn him. The court employee, Sarah Harris, 23, had learned about the investigation when a Drug Enforcement Administration task force officer came in to file applications for other electronic surveillance in the case.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
In Maryland, those arrested on the street or after police have obtained a warrant must be given a court hearing within 24 hours of being taken into custody. At that initial hearing they have a chance to learn the charges against them and to request their release pending trial. But some suspects recently have ended up waiting much longer than 24 hours before getting their first day in court, a violation of their civil rights that potentially puts the city in legal jeopardy if they later challenge their detention.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 7, 2014
Forty years ago, Congress enacted sweeping limits on political campaign spending in the wake of a shocking disclosure that one man - Chicago insurance executive W. Clement Stone - had given more than $3 million for the 1972 reelection of President Richard M. Nixon. The amount seemed outlandish then, in a campaign in which Nixon waltzed to victory over his Democratic opponent, Sen. George McGovern, winning 49 states and losing only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. It was an easily predictable drubbing.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
In the world of John G. Roberts Jr., it appears the only true case of government corruption is the "American Hustle" style of handing over a pile of money to a congressman in some smoke-filled backroom deal. Yet here in the real world, we've come to understand that corruption is a subtler evil where money buys access and preference, resulting in gifts not necessarily tied up with a bow under a tree, but just as real and valuable. Forty years ago, Americans were outraged by this potential assault on democracy, and so were enough members of Congress to support bipartisan limits on campaign donations.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Maryland's heated primary race for governor could get another twist if Wednesday's Supreme Court decision also strikes down the state's cap on how much residents can donate to state political campaigns. Minutes after the Supreme Court struck down aggregate contribution limits in federal races, Jared DeMarinis' phone at the Maryland Board of Elections began ringing off the hook. “Everyone wants to know: What does this mean?” said DeMarinis, director of campaign finance and candidacy.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
A divided Supreme Court has struck down aggregate limits on how much money wealthy donors may spend on elections, a decision that could pour vast sums of new cash into the nation's increasingly expensive system of campaign finance. The 5-4 ruling Wednesday, which drew a pointed response from the court's dissenting liberals, will have broad implications for federal elections but also could affect contests in Maryland - including this year's race for governor - by undermining similar contribution limits called for in state law. Writing for the court, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. said the caps on political donations did little to address corruption but limited donors' ability to exercise their free-speech right to contribute to candidates.
HEALTH
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Lawyers have reached settlements in two pending class action cases alleging that former cardiologist Mark G. Midei performed unnecessary stent procedures at St. Joseph Medical Center, according to the hospital's former owner. Michael Romano, a spokesman for Catholic Health Initiatives, which used to own the Towson medical center, said the agreements will resolve the cases. "The parties executed the settlement to avoid the uncertainties and costs of continued litigation, and the settlement does not include any admission of liability," Romano said in a statement.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.