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NEWS
October 2, 2006
The U.S. Supreme Court starts another new term today, with all justices in place. The newest members, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who was confirmed in time to open the term last year, and Samuel A. Alito Jr., who joined in midterm, seem settled in and have lined up with conservative Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas pretty much as expected. Justices John Paul Stevens, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David H. Souter and Stephen G. Breyer tend to be on the other side, and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy has stepped into the swing vote role played so long by retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2013
Here is a sampling of the bashing Maryland fans got on Twitter after storming the court Wednesday night when Alex Len's follow of a Pe'Shon Howard airball gave the Terps a 51-50 win over No. 14 North Carolina State. Did Maryland fans really storm the court after beating NC State or is that another hoax? -- Matt Smith ‏(@SamENole) So Maryland beat NC State for the 10th time in last 11 meetings and the fans storm the court? Apparently none of them bet on their team..
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | December 16, 2009
A 13-year veteran of the Baltimore Police Department died early Monday after he apparently suffered a heart attack while driving from his home in Baltimore County to a court appearance, according to city officials. Officer Robert W. Peregoy, 47, had been assigned to the Violent Crime Impact Division. He is survived by his wife of 27 years and three sons. He was born in Gettysburg, Pa., and graduated from Francis Scott Key High School in 1980. He earned 18 credits from Central Texas College and served in the Army until 1995, when he was honorably discharged as a military police officer stationed in Germany.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
The naysayers have warned for years that there is no market for new housing in the Eutaw Street corridor.They've predicted that nothing, short of free rent, would entice people to move to the area north of Lexington Market.But the so-called experts were wrong, by at least 100 people.That's the number of residents who already have moved to Mulberry Court, the $4.2 million apartment complex that recently opened at the northeast corner of Mulberry and Eutaw streets. And more are on the way.With its bluish-purple walls and bright yellow downspouts, the 62-unit complex is the first example of housing built from scratch in the Market Center area in nearly a decade.
NEWS
By Jack Fruchtman Jr | November 30, 2000
MOST LEGAL ANALYSTS were astounded when the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to review whether the Florida Supreme Court violated federal law and the Constitution when it unanimously ruled that manual recounts in three Florida counties could continue until Nov. 26. After all, this is the court that has tried to return political authority to state and local government at the expense of federal law. Make no mistake about it: This is an activist Supreme Court,...
NEWS
May 10, 2006
When Baltimore prosecutors showed up for the April 24 trial of accused child murderer Keith M. Garrett, there wasn't a judge available to hear the case. The time before that, on Feb. 21, same thing: No court available. That's in a courthouse with 32 sitting judges. What's wrong with this picture? Lots. "No court available" means there isn't a judge free to handle the case. It is the reason most often cited for postponing a case in Baltimore Circuit Court after the unavailability of defense lawyers, according to court figures.
NEWS
March 19, 1999
The New York Times said in an editorial Wednesday:A CONGRESSIONAL hearing on the Supreme Court's annual budget last week took a valuable detour as Justices Clarence Thomas and David Souter engaged in a lengthy colloquy with lawmakers about the court's dismal record in recruiting and hiring minority law clerks.Each of the nine justices personally selects up to four law clerks each term to help with screening appeals and drafting opinions.The current term's crop of 34 clerks includes only one minority member -- a Hispanic woman -- and for the second year running, the court hired no African-American clerks.
NEWS
June 26, 2007
The right to a fair trial is such a fundamental freedom in this country that the charges leveled against the U.S. Coast Guard's administrative court system merit serious attention, at the very least. The single most damning piece of evidence is the sworn statement made by a retired Coast Guard judge who says she was told to always rule in the government's favor. Imagine a U.S. District Court adjudicating civil cases under the same guidelines. Impeachment proceedings couldn't be arranged fast enough.
NEWS
June 13, 2006
As a rule, the easiest thing to get Congress to do is nothing. That would be preferable to the Senate Judiciary Committee's effort to impose a retroactive legal framework on the Bush administration's apparently illegal program of spying on Americans without court approval. The first hearing on what is likely to be a series of legal challenges to the administration's warrantless wiretap and telephone record data-mining programs was held yesterday before a U.S. District Court judge in Detroit.
NEWS
September 29, 2005
Despite some sniping and griping by Democrats, Judge John G. Roberts Jr. is certain to be confirmed today as chief justice of the United States. But he won't have much time to savor the moment as he'll have to dive right into the nearly 50 cases that are facing the court as it begins the 2005-2006 term on Monday. Even without some of the surefire attention-getters in the lineup of cases - including campaign finance reform, capital punishment, abortion rights, assisted suicide, military recruiters on campus, and police searches - this would be an unusual court session.
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