Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCourt S Decision
IN THE NEWS

Court S Decision

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 26, 2010
Sometimes, though rarely, a Supreme Court ruling is so startling and jarring that Congress is moved swiftly to counter it. That may, and certainly should, be the response to the court's decision declaring unconstitutional a 1999 federal law against creation and distribution of material depicting acts of animal cruelty. By an unusual and rather remarkable 8-1 vote, with Justice Samuel A. Alito, a member of the conservative bloc, the only dissenter, the court held that the law was so broad that it violated the free speech protection under the First Amendment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 26, 2010
Sometimes, though rarely, a Supreme Court ruling is so startling and jarring that Congress is moved swiftly to counter it. That may, and certainly should, be the response to the court's decision declaring unconstitutional a 1999 federal law against creation and distribution of material depicting acts of animal cruelty. By an unusual and rather remarkable 8-1 vote, with Justice Samuel A. Alito, a member of the conservative bloc, the only dissenter, the court held that the law was so broad that it violated the free speech protection under the First Amendment.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 21, 1991
A Carroll delegate says a U.S. Supreme Court decision last week limiting appeals of criminal convictions should aid his effort to have a similar law passed in Maryland.The House Judiciary Committee killed a bill last session introduced by Delegate Richard N. Dixon, D-Carroll, intended to prohibit convicts --especially those sentenced to the death penalty -- from filing numerous appeals of verdicts and sentences at taxpayers' expense.Dixon's bill would have required courts to determine if a convictshould be entitled to free legal assistance from the public defender's office at a stage of the appeals process when it is guaranteed.
NEWS
By Jim Puzzanghera and Jim Puzzanghera,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 5, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a victory for TV networks but a setback for efforts to shield children from coarse language, a federal appeals court ruled yesterday that broadcasters cannot be penalized for expletives that are considered impromptu. The three-judge panel in New York repudiated the Federal Communications Commission's recent crackdown on broadcast indecency, calling its efforts "arbitrary and capricious." TV networks long have complained that enforcement of the rules is inconsistent and unpredictable.
NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 22, 2004
The Florida Supreme Court rejected yesterday Gov. Jeb Bush's request to reconsider its decision striking down a state law that had allowed him to keep a severely brain-damaged woman alive. Issued without comment, the unanimous one-page order paves the way for the removal of the feeding tube that sustains Terri Schiavo, ending a six-year legal battle between her husband and her parents over her fate. When - or if - that will happen, however, remains up in the air. The timing depends on both the governor's next move, which was uncertain yesterday, and on a lower court's decision on a new issue raised by Schiavo's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock and Tom Bowman and Jay Hancock,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 13, 2000
WASHINGTON - Democratic and Republican lawmakers grappled with the complex and confusing Supreme Court decision last night but most came to the same conclusion: The end is near for Al Gore's presidential hopes. The high court, in a 5-4 decision, sent the case back to the Florida Supreme Court but effectively told the court there was no time to come up with a new and uniform standard for a recount. A majority of the court said in an opinion released about 10 p.m. that Dec. 12, yesterday, was the date for electors to be chosen, brushing aside the insistence of a dissenting justice that Florida should at least be given the chance to complete a new recount by Dec. 18. That's the date electors from the states cast their ballots for president and vice president.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 30, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court refused for a second time yesterday to get pulled into the politically charged fight over gay marriage in Massachusetts, rejecting an appeal from some state lawmakers and national conservative groups that want to see a year-old state court ruling that legalized gay unions overturned. The justices did not comment in declining to hear the appeal, just as the court remained silent in May when it refused to stop county clerks in Massachusetts from issuing the first marriage licenses to same-sex couples.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
The U.S. Supreme Court will not hear an appeal filed by Taneytown farmer serving 50 years in prison for sexually abusing his oldest daughter.Without comment last week, the nation's highest court declined to hear the man's case, in which he was seeking to have his March 1990 conviction on six child sexual abuse charges overturned.In papers filed in November, the 54-year-old man said his constitutional rights were violated.He claims he was coerced into making confessions to a counselor and a state trooper that were used in court as evidence against him. Maryland's appellate courts rejected that contention.
NEWS
By GAIL GIBSON AND JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and GAIL GIBSON AND JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTERS | June 13, 2006
The Supreme Court broadened the legal path yesterday for death row inmates to challenge lethal injection as an inhumane method of execution. Its ruling could prompt a wave of appeals from condemned prisoners, but the court gave no hint that those arguments would succeed. In Maryland, the issue already is playing out in the case of Vernon Lee Evans Jr., who was convicted in a 1983 double murder intended to silence witnesses in a drug trial. The state's highest court in February halted Evans' scheduled execution to hear his challenge to lethal injection procedures, and a related appeal is pending in Baltimore's federal court.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | July 4, 2003
WASHINGTON - In his fuming dissent from the Supreme Court's historic decision in a Texas sodomy case, Justice Antonin Scalia says the next step is gay marriage. He does not make this prediction with a tone of delight. He also is not quite right. A lot more legal, political and cultural steps lie between here and where Justice Scalia fears that the high court's decision is taking us. A few days after the decision, Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist hinted at the battle ahead when he declared his support for a proposed constitutional amendment to ban homosexual marriages.
NEWS
By GAIL GIBSON and GAIL GIBSON,SUN REPORTER | July 14, 2006
The highly secret spy court that would pass judgment on the National Security Agency's warrantless surveillance program under a deal announced yesterday has issued just one public ruling in its nearly 30-year history and from its inception was never intended to consider the kind of complex constitutional questions at issue in the heated debate over the government's counterterrorism methods. Instead, judges on the nation's most shrouded court sit primarily to rule on government applications to search the homes or monitor the phones and e-mail of terrorism suspects inside the United States - requests that almost always are approved.
NEWS
By GAIL GIBSON AND JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and GAIL GIBSON AND JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN REPORTERS | June 13, 2006
The Supreme Court broadened the legal path yesterday for death row inmates to challenge lethal injection as an inhumane method of execution. Its ruling could prompt a wave of appeals from condemned prisoners, but the court gave no hint that those arguments would succeed. In Maryland, the issue already is playing out in the case of Vernon Lee Evans Jr., who was convicted in a 1983 double murder intended to silence witnesses in a drug trial. The state's highest court in February halted Evans' scheduled execution to hear his challenge to lethal injection procedures, and a related appeal is pending in Baltimore's federal court.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 2, 2005
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- South Africa's highest court ruled yesterday that same-sex marriages have the same legal status as those between men and women, effectively making the nation one of five worldwide that have removed legal barriers to gay unions. The Constitutional Court, as the high court is known, effectively stayed its ruling for one year to give the Parliament time to amend a 1961 marriage law to reflect its decision. If the legislature balks, the court said, the law will be automatically changed to make its provisions gender-neutral.
BUSINESS
By Ameet Sachdev, Greg Burns and Andrew Countryman and Ameet Sachdev, Greg Burns and Andrew Countryman,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 1, 2005
CHICAGO - Jim Cunha's phone started ringing long before he left for work yesterday, as his former colleagues at the Andersen accounting firm called him to give him the good news. For Cunha, a former managing partner of Andersen's office in Columbus, Ohio, the Supreme Court's decision to overturn the firm's conviction was at long last vindication for what he calls "a business lynching" by the federal government. "In a sense, this just reaffirms what you knew all along," said Cunha, now a business consultant in Northern California.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 13, 2005
WASHINGTON - A month after a closely watched Supreme Court decision upended the sentencing system for federal crimes, U.S. judges across the country are struggling to navigate their newfound discretion amid thousands of appeals, widespread confusion and sharp scrutiny from critics who are on guard for soft punishments. In a complex decision that touched off temporary chaos in the nation's federal courts, the Supreme Court ruled that the guidelines that have shaped criminal sentences for nearly two decades must be considered advisory instead of mandatory.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 4, 2004
KIEV, Ukraine - Ukraine's Supreme Court threw out the results of last month's presidential election yesterday because of widespread fraud and ordered a new runoff to take place by Dec. 26, a victory for opposition demonstrators who have held 12 days of street protests. The court's chief justice, after seven hours of deliberations, said in proceedings broadcast live on Ukrainian television that "systematic violations" of election laws in the Nov. 21 presidential runoff "affected the results of the election and rendered them impossible to certify."
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 2001
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court term that ended last week had its share of important cases with long-term significance and practical effects. But at least for the next several years, it will be remembered almost exclusively for Bush vs. Gore and a 5-4 ruling that decided the presidency. Not since Roe vs. Wade in 1973 has a single decision so defined a year of the Supreme Court's work. Bush vs. Gore put the court at the center of public attention in a way that few cases have. For the first time, a national audience could hear the justices in action as the networks broadcast a recording of oral arguments before the court.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Working itself almost to the point of exhaustion, the Supreme Court reshaped the nation's constitutional landscape in a matter of a few days as it closed its nine-month term last week.Even as it was refusing to create broad new constitutional rights -- denying, for example, a right to doctor-assisted suicide -- the court made bold use of its judicial power to redefine the Constitution and the role of government.Grappling with what an 18th-century document means for judges nearing the dawn of the 21st, the court found new guidance on novel issues of life and death, law and order, religious freedom and the distribution of governmental power.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 30, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Supreme Court refused for a second time yesterday to get pulled into the politically charged fight over gay marriage in Massachusetts, rejecting an appeal from some state lawmakers and national conservative groups that want to see a year-old state court ruling that legalized gay unions overturned. The justices did not comment in declining to hear the appeal, just as the court remained silent in May when it refused to stop county clerks in Massachusetts from issuing the first marriage licenses to same-sex couples.
NEWS
By Maya Bell and Maya Bell,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 22, 2004
The Florida Supreme Court rejected yesterday Gov. Jeb Bush's request to reconsider its decision striking down a state law that had allowed him to keep a severely brain-damaged woman alive. Issued without comment, the unanimous one-page order paves the way for the removal of the feeding tube that sustains Terri Schiavo, ending a six-year legal battle between her husband and her parents over her fate. When - or if - that will happen, however, remains up in the air. The timing depends on both the governor's next move, which was uncertain yesterday, and on a lower court's decision on a new issue raised by Schiavo's parents, Bob and Mary Schindler.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.