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By Andrea F. Siegel and By Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
She's heard them all, the unbelievable witnesses, the growling plaintiffs, the defendants with excuses. For 40 years, she either dutifully recorded and transcribed their words or supervised the people whose job it was to keep court proceedings. But come this week, Conchita "Connie" Tuers will not worry about whether the recording equipment is cranky, how fast the transcription service can turn a day of courtroom drama into a blue-bound paperback that looks like a stage script, or if a new clerk can find the court-recording office.
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop , tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 15, 2009
Bench conferences - behind-the-curtain glimpses of candor between judges and attorneys in court - can no longer be viewed by the public in Baltimore City Circuit Court. The recent development, which belatedly enforces a year-old rule, undoes a history of access and diverges from policies in some other jurisdictions. Such conversations, held privately at the front of the courtroom during public proceedings, often contain the meat of the case, including the details of plea arrangements and sometimes even entire sentencings.
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
Anna Klemmsen sat quietly through a routine docket of plea agreements and postponements in Howard County Circuit Court one recent morning. A few times, she looked up from her desk and scanned the courtroom, or looked at a lawyer reading facts into the record.Mostly, though, she focused on a piece of paper, jotted notes -- and listened.For 23 years, Klemmsen captured every word and mumble uttered in Howard County's courtrooms. She was a court reporter, one of a dying breed of stenographers and tape-recording monitors who turn spoken words into written ones.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 15, 2009
Bench conferences - behind-the-curtain glimpses of candor between judges and attorneys in court - can no longer be viewed by the public in Baltimore City Circuit Court. The recent development, which belatedly enforces a year-old rule, undoes a history of access and diverges from policies in some other jurisdictions. Such conversations, held privately at the front of the courtroom during public proceedings, often contain the meat of the case, including the details of plea arrangements and sometimes even entire sentencings.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff Writer | July 19, 1994
At a convention yesterday for people who have hearing loss, Marcia Simmons described a new technology that lets the audience read along with a lecturer's words.As the Central Michigan University doctoral student spoke, her words appeared on a screen behind her. Nearby, a woman seated behind a steno machine steadily typed.What Ms. Simmons said and the words on the screen demonstrated real-time reporting, a service in which court reporters type on steno machines, just as they do in courtrooms, but paper tape does not trail out of the machines.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | November 27, 1990
City Register of Wills Mary W. Conaway is challenging the $60 fee that the Orphans' Court charges for hearings to appoint legal guardians and to settle estates.Baltimore is the only jurisdiction in the state that charges an Orphans' Court hearing fee, and Conaway has written Robert C. Murphy, chief judge of the Court of Appeals, and asked him to investigate the matter."What bothers me is that it is yet another fee imposed on people of Baltimore City," Conaway says.Conaway, who serves as clerk to the Orphans' Court, says many Baltimoreans cannot afford to pay the fee.RTC Murphy says he has received Conaway's letter and asked Susan Whiteford, a lawyer in the state attorney general's office, to examine its assertions.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1994
It helps disabled people and non-English speakers participate in court more easily and can help judges and juries follow complicated trials more precisely. It also gives lawyers a tool they can use to trip up witnesses.Helps lawyers? This is a good thing?Sure, says Alfred A. Betz. Mr. Betz is the chief executive of Betz & Strouse Inc., the area's biggest court reporting firm.He says technology is transforming the most oft-overlooked job in the courtroom, as his firm moves toward transcription methods that can produce a record in real time, instead of the week to 10 days traditional methods take.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
As a top litigator for a Baltimore law firm, William D. Quarles had to speak the language of legalese, riddled with words like collateral estoppel and nunc pro tunc. Now a judge on Baltimore's Circuit Court, he is forced to learn another language: street-ese, laced with such words as "banked" (mugged on the street), "ready" (crack cocaine), "hooptie" (an old car) and "kick it out" (give me all your money). It's a lingo that all of Quarles' fellow judges, prosecutors, defense lawyers and court reporters have to learn.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop , tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 15, 2009
Bench conferences - behind-the-curtain glimpses of candor between judges and attorneys in court - can no longer be viewed by the public in Baltimore City Circuit Court. The recent development, which belatedly enforces a year-old rule, undoes a history of access and diverges from policies in some other jurisdictions. Such conversations, held privately at the front of the courtroom during public proceedings, often contain the meat of the case, including the details of plea arrangements and sometimes even entire sentencings.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | tricia.bishop@baltsun.com | December 15, 2009
Bench conferences - behind-the-curtain glimpses of candor between judges and attorneys in court - can no longer be viewed by the public in Baltimore City Circuit Court. The recent development, which belatedly enforces a year-old rule, undoes a history of access and diverges from policies in some other jurisdictions. Such conversations, held privately at the front of the courtroom during public proceedings, often contain the meat of the case, including the details of plea arrangements and sometimes even entire sentencings.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | April 14, 2009
Sharon Shapiro, a court reporter who also worked as a freelance sound engineer, died Friday of breast cancer at Washington Adventist Hospital. The Silver Spring resident was 56. Ms. Shapiro was born in Baltimore and raised on Upper Park Heights Avenue. While attending Northwestern High School, she performed in musicals. After graduating in 1970, she earned a bachelor's degree in communications from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 1974. While at UM, Ms. Shapiro hosted Ms. Understood on the college's radio station.
BUSINESS
By NANYC JONES-BONBREST and NANYC JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 23, 2008
Dwayne Harrison Court reporter Gore Brothers Reporting & Videoconferencing, Baltimore Salary --$85,000 Age --48 Years on the job --26 How he got started --Tired of sitting at a cubicle as a clerk-typist while working for the Social Security Administration, Harrison began looking around for other careers. A co-worker suggested court reporting, so he applied to a local college and began taking classes. He started working at Gore Brothers in 1982 and operates as an independent contractor for that company.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2003
Raymond Lucas Underwood Sr., a court reporter for 30 years for Baltimore County Circuit Court and a former police officer, died Thursday of complications from Parkinson's disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. The former Cockeysville resident was 75. Born in Sykesville, he was raised on a farm on Schoolhouse Road, which later was named Underwood Road because his family's farm was located there. Mr. Underwood graduated in 1946 from Sykesville High School and attended the University of Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
Bonnie Gahagan, a court reporter whose ability to type as fast as 275 words a minute on transcription machines assisted her in assignments to criminal trials of Lt. Col. Oliver North and former Washington Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr., died Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of a rare form of cancer. The Parkville resident was 47. Family members said she died of nasopharygeal cancer, a disease of the head and neck diagnosed in 1999. Born Bonnie De Carlo in Baltimore and raised on Macon Street, she was a 1973 graduate of Patterson High School.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Lisa Goldberg and Larry Carson and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | February 1, 2002
A specialized drug treatment court could be operating in Howard County by July 2003 if officials move the project forward, according to an interim report on the idea issued yesterday. With 80 percent of the county's jail inmates and criminal defendants involved somehow with substance abuse, and 72 percent of civil cases involving termination of parental rights also affected, the committee studying the court idea feels it is needed. For now, the 24-member work group is asking only for enough money for one co- ordinator to bring the concept to fruition.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and By Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
She's heard them all, the unbelievable witnesses, the growling plaintiffs, the defendants with excuses. For 40 years, she either dutifully recorded and transcribed their words or supervised the people whose job it was to keep court proceedings. But come this week, Conchita "Connie" Tuers will not worry about whether the recording equipment is cranky, how fast the transcription service can turn a day of courtroom drama into a blue-bound paperback that looks like a stage script, or if a new clerk can find the court-recording office.
NEWS
By Staff Report | July 27, 1993
Frank B. Carter Jr., the first black court reporter for the Supreme Bench of Baltimore and author of a mystery novel, died Friday of heart failure at Franklin Square Hospital.Mr. Carter, who was 68 and lived on Elderon Avenue, retired in 1989 from what had by then become the Baltimore Circuit Court. Family members said his 1964 appointment also made him the first black court reporter in Maryland.Judge Joseph H. H. Kaplan, administrative judge of the Baltimore Circuit Court, described him as "a superior reporter who did a great job for many years."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2003
Bonnie Gahagan, a court reporter whose ability to type as fast as 275 words a minute on transcription machines assisted her in assignments to criminal trials of Lt. Col. Oliver North and former Washington Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr., died Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of a rare form of cancer. The Parkville resident was 47. Family members said she died of nasopharygeal cancer, a disease of the head and neck diagnosed in 1999. Born Bonnie De Carlo in Baltimore and raised on Macon Street, she was a 1973 graduate of Patterson High School.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
As a top litigator for a Baltimore law firm, William D. Quarles had to speak the language of legalese, riddled with words like collateral estoppel and nunc pro tunc. Now a judge on Baltimore's Circuit Court, he is forced to learn another language: street-ese, laced with such words as "banked" (mugged on the street), "ready" (crack cocaine), "hooptie" (an old car) and "kick it out" (give me all your money). It's a lingo that all of Quarles' fellow judges, prosecutors, defense lawyers and court reporters have to learn.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1999
Anna Klemmsen sat quietly through a routine docket of plea agreements and postponements in Howard County Circuit Court one recent morning. A few times, she looked up from her desk and scanned the courtroom, or looked at a lawyer reading facts into the record.Mostly, though, she focused on a piece of paper, jotted notes -- and listened.For 23 years, Klemmsen captured every word and mumble uttered in Howard County's courtrooms. She was a court reporter, one of a dying breed of stenographers and tape-recording monitors who turn spoken words into written ones.
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