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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
The Maryland attorney general's office has filed a motion to delay an order from a federal judge finding that the state's handgun permitting process is unconstitutional, pending an appeal. Calling the ruling an "unmapped" legal issue, attorneys for the state argue in a motion filed late Wednesday that clarification from the appellate courts "would be prudent in light of the potentially significant adverse consequences for public safety. " The attorneys wrote that granting a motion to stay the court order would also allow the Maryland General Assembly to consider whether to enact legislation that might address the court's concerns while upholding the intent of the state's restrictions.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ordered an absentee Baltimore landlord to clean up about 50 blighted properties within 90 days, the first ruling since a state law was amended two years ago to make it easier for community groups to sue the owners of problem properties. Judge Pamela J. White found that 49 properties owned by Scott Wizig and corporate affiliates represented legal nuisances, with "unsafe and uninhabitable" conditions that have not been fixed despite requests by community groups and notices of violations of the building code.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
The state could be forced by next week to let suspected criminals in Baltimore go free until trial if it does not provide them with lawyers at the time their bail is set. A sweeping order by a city judge would accelerate the timetable for a substantial change in the pretrial release system, and Maryland's top court will consider the matter next week. State officials are wrestling with the prospect of providing public defenders for the hundreds of defendants who come before bail commissioners daily.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
A Baltimore County judge has warned County Executive Kevin Kamenetz and two other county officials they could face jail time or other penalties for refusing to pay more than $1 million to police retirees despite a court order to do so. In an unusual order, Circuit Judge Michael J. Finifter directed Kamenetz, county administrative officer Fred Homan and budget and finance director Keith Dorsey to appear before him June 26 to show why the court "should...
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 21, 1993
A good stockbroker is worth keeping. So imagine being separated from your favorite by a court order. It actually happened, says Mutual Fund Market News, a Boston newsletter.When a California broker left Merrill Lynch to join another firm, some of his top clients -- many of them friends and relatives -- decided to take their business with him.Not so fast, said Merrill Lynch.When Merrill hired the broker, he signed an agreement stating that, should he switch firms, he would not contact his Merrill Lynch clients for at least a year after his departure.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 6, 1997
Pines, dogwoods and wild cherry trees came down by the dozens in Mary L. Bowman's back yard yesterday -- the casualties of a nasty, seven-year neighborhood feud over a blocked view.With chain saws and tree chippers breaking the quiet of her exclusive Green Spring Valley community, Bowman began complying with a court order to remove 200 trees ruled to be in violation of a neighborhood covenant."I never thought I'd ever see the day to watch the stripping of my back yard," Bowman said as a worker dragged off a white dogwood, still in bloom.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
A 44-year-old Edgewater man was arrested early Wednesday after swinging a sword at law enforcement officers during an eight-hour standoff that began when a sheriff's deputy attempted to serve a court order, authorities said. Michael R. Beach, who according to Anne Arundel County Sheriff Ron Bateman was "well-known" to his deputies and police, was being served with a protective order filed by his mother, Martha Beach, who wanted to have her son removed from her home, a spokesman for the sheriff's office said . It was the second time in three years that she had filed a protective order against her son, according to electronic court records.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
The principle of separation of church and state has been a pillar of American democracy since the country's founding, and most people think they know what it means. Yet in practice, the proper balance between freedom of religious expression and what is appropriate when it comes to the business of government has always been a matter of contention. This is an issue over which reasonable people can disagree, but the Carroll County Board of Commissioners surely did itself no favor this week by trying to win the argument by simply shouting the other side down.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | brent.jones@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Three months after a judge ordered the state to speed up delivery of food stamps and medical benefits to low-income Maryland residents, the problem has worsened, court filings show. At the end of January, the state's Department of Human Resources was operating at an 81 percent compliance rate processing those requests, down 2.5 percentage points from the previous month, according to papers filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. Lawyers for the plaintiffs say the decline shows that the state - which faces a year-end deadline to improve services - continues to struggle.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Two domestic violence bills on Gov. Martin O'Malley's wish list won final passage in the General Assembly Monday night, pushing his agenda closer to completion. One of the measures would ease the burden of proof for domestic violence victims asking a judge to issue a protective court order against an alleged abuser. Maryland is now the only state to require "clear and convincing" proof of abuse. The bill would change that to the "preponderance of the evidence" standard used in other states.
NEWS
March 27, 2014
The principle of separation of church and state has been a pillar of American democracy since the country's founding, and most people think they know what it means. Yet in practice, the proper balance between freedom of religious expression and what is appropriate when it comes to the business of government has always been a matter of contention. This is an issue over which reasonable people can disagree, but the Carroll County Board of Commissioners surely did itself no favor this week by trying to win the argument by simply shouting the other side down.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | February 13, 2014
The Maryland Senate passed one of the governor's proposals to combat domestic violence Thursday, sending to the House a bill that would make it easier for assault victims to obtain permanent court orders telling their abusers to stay away. Meeting despite the snow, senators approved the measure that would add second-degree assault to the list of crimes that can trigger a protective order. There was no debate or dissent. A similar measure is scheduled for a hearing in the House next week.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
The state could be forced by next week to let suspected criminals in Baltimore go free until trial if it does not provide them with lawyers at the time their bail is set. A sweeping order by a city judge would accelerate the timetable for a substantial change in the pretrial release system, and Maryland's top court will consider the matter next week. State officials are wrestling with the prospect of providing public defenders for the hundreds of defendants who come before bail commissioners daily.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2013
Pre-trial arguments are expected to be heard Tuesday in a high-profile murder and drug conspiracy case in which most defendants have flipped and attorneys couldn't review evidence with their clients until two days before trial due to safety concerns from prosecutors. Robert G. Moore, 45, is accused of being at the top of an East Baltimore drug syndicate that killed a man and shot five others to avenge the death of his relative, former prep wrestling standout Darian Kess. Prosecutors pointed to the indictment when it was filed 16 months ago as an example of taking on complex and challenging case.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Supreme Court halted same-sex marriages in Utah on Monday in the wake of a federal judge's ruling that would have made Utah the 18th state to allow same-sex marriages. The court's unsigned order puts same-sex weddings on hold in Utah pending the final appeal of a Dec. 20 decision made by U.S. District Court Judge Robert Shelby. Shelby found Utah's same-sex marriage ban to be unconstitutional and mandated an immediate end to Utah's law barring same-sex marriage. Same-sex couples began to get marriage licenses shortly thereafter.
NEWS
By John J. Boronow and Steven S. Sharfstein | December 29, 2013
Treatment refusal occurs in medical/surgical settings across the world every day: a child with leukemia resisting a painful bone-marrow biopsy, an elderly man with Alzheimer's fighting his medication, a woman awakening from a coma and demanding release. And in most instances, "society" - as represented by the family, the health care providers and our legal institutions - has well-established, ethical, effective and efficient mechanisms for enabling the treatment to proceed. But that same society frequently fails people with severe mental illness who also have a related affliction known as "anosognosia" - essentially the inability to recognize one's own illness, however obvious it may be to everyone else.
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