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By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Two elected court officials are objecting to plans to temporarily empty Howard County's gray granite Circuit Court building late this year for $4.5 million worth of renovations. "I'm not going to move," said a defiant Circuit Court Clerk Margaret D. Rappaport, who said the thousands of civil and criminal court files she administers in the building's basement would take days to move and the public disruption would be too great. She suggested saving the renovation money for use on a new court building, and just doing some minimal repairs on one section at a time.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2012
Howard County's 19th-century courthouse has seen a 40 percent increase in jury trials in the past year, causing court officials to clamor for a new facility. "Our county is growing, our population is growing, and that means more case filing," said Administrative Judge Lenore R. Gelfman. "The demands have been significant for a while. " Gelfman, County State's Attorney Dario J. Broccolino and Sheriff James F. Fitzgerald told the County Council last week that the increase is too much for the 170-year-old Ellicott City courthouse, which is cramped and outdated.
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NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Sun Staff Writer | January 24, 1995
Baltimore jurors, already the lowest paid in the state at $10 a day, would see their pay cut in half under a preliminary budget submitted by city court officials.The proposal is at the center of a budget tussle between Joseph H. H. Kaplan, the city's administrative judge, and Edward J. Gallagher, the city budget director.While justifying the proposal as the quickest way to cut the court budget to meet city demands, Judge Kaplan said in the next breath that he'd rather see the city relax its budget allowance and leave juror pay where it is.In response, Mr. Gallagher said the juror fee reduction would not be considered and the $6.6 million "target" figure would remain "pretty firm."
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2010
Two elected court officials are objecting to plans to temporarily empty Howard County's gray granite Circuit Court building late this year for $4.5 million worth of renovations. "I'm not going to move," said a defiant Circuit Court Clerk Margaret D. Rappaport, who said the thousands of civil and criminal court files she administers in the building's basement would take days to move and the public disruption would be too great. She suggested saving the renovation money for use on a new court building, and just doing some minimal repairs on one section at a time.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 22, 1999
NEW YORK -- The chief administrator of the Manhattan Matrimonial Court has accepted tens of thousands of dollars in bribes over the past seven years to expedite hundreds of divorces and get approvals on others that were fraudulently prepared, prosecutors said yesterday.The administrator, Steven Singer, admitted Friday that he accepted bribes ranging from $10 to hundreds of dollars to take divorce papers and -- without having verified the authenticity of the papers as required -- quickly forward them to a judge for signing as uncontested divorces.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2000
WASHINGTON, D.C. - Maryland's top judge and Baltimore court officials told their "tale of woe" to hundreds of judges, prosecutors and defense attorneys from around the country yesterday, becoming a national example of what happens when a justice system falls into disrepair. Their message: Work together so this doesn't happen to you, splashed all over your hometown newspaper. "I was not pleased with the focus of the attention on the Baltimore City courts, Maryland Court of Appeal Chief Judge Robert M. Bell told the room of 300 participants at a Department of Justice symposium.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham and Caitlin Francke and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1999
Maryland's Court of Appeals yesterday overturned a lower court's ruling that a convicted sex offender was denied a "speedy trial" under state law because his case was delayed nine times in Baltimore Circuit Court over 16 months.The opinion issued by the state's highest court gives Baltimore judges and prosecutors some breathing room after an embarrassing courthouse crisis that shook public confidence in the justice system.The unanimous opinion, written by Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, said the sex crime conviction against James T. Brown Jr. should not have been dismissed under state law. The ruling calls into question the status of other cases recently dismissed because the suspects waited far beyond the state's 180-day "speedy trial" deadline for their trials to begin.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 14, 2001
Frederick chemist Alan Bruce Chmurny died yesterday, less than 24 hours after he swallowed a cyanide pill in open court after hearing a jury convict him of trying to poison a former co-worker with mercury. Chmurny, who had been in the intensive care unit at Howard County General Hospital, was pronounced dead at 1:55 p.m., said hospital spokeswoman Mary Patton, who confirmed that Chmurny suffered cyanide poisoning. Chmurny's decision to swallow the pill Wednesday unnerved Howard Circuit Court officials and stunned his lawyer, Dino Flores.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2000
Baltimore court officials put in place yesterday another key reform to streamline criminal cases in the beleaguered Circuit Court. A new criminal case management system will give judges and court officials more control over the flow of the criminal docket. Cases will be scheduled for trial depending on the complexity. A gun case, for example, will be set for trial within 60 days of a defendant's arraignment. But homicide cases take longer to prepare for and try, so they will be set for trial about 120 days after arraignment, according to a news release from the judicial system.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 22, 1993
After Edward Pinkney received a suspended sentence for possession of marijuana, he and his wife went to claim the $750 bond they had paid to secure his release while awaiting trial. Imagine their surprise when Baltimore court officials mistakenly cut them a check for almost $7,500."I thought it was a blessing straight from God," Mr. Pinkney said. "I was ecstatic. . . . I was running around like I was crazy."Now, however, Mr. Pinkney is feeling more cursed than blessed. Circuit Court officials are threatening to prosecute if he doesn't repay the money, and he says he no longer has it all.Mr.
NEWS
By Larry Carson | July 5, 2009
The owners of a popular Columbia nightspot were fined $500 for serving alcohol to minors after a fight in the parking lot led police to two underage men who had been drinking inside before the altercation. The incident at 2 a.m. May 10 brought several officers to Nottingham's, in the 8800 block of Stanford Blvd., where they found a semiconscious man in the parking lot and three people in a silver Honda trying to drive away. The Honda driver sped in reverse at high speed after seeing the patrol car, hitting a curb, Officer Timothy Kane testified.
NEWS
November 9, 2008
Man, 20, pleads guilty to August handgun charges Davon Temple, 20, who as a teenager sidestepped prosecution in connection with a double homicide, pleaded guilty Friday to being in possession of a handgun. He was sentenced to three years' probation. Police arrested Temple in the April 23, 2006, shooting deaths of Jennifer Morelock and Jason Woycio, two Carroll County residents police think had been in the city buying drugs. Temple was charged in the slayings when an officer found a text message on his phone that said, "I killed 2 white people around my way 2day & 1 of them was a woman," according to charging documents.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Many motorists know the age-old speeding ticket routine - get pulled over, wait at least 10 minutes for an officer to write a barely legible citation and hope to remember to mail a check within 15 days. But fumbling with carbon copies and postage stamps might soon be a thing of the past. By the end of the month, the Maryland State Police, which issues a third of all speeding tickets issued in the state, plans to deploy an electronic citation system, and law enforcement agencies in almost 30 other jurisdictions have expressed interest in doing the same, police and court officials say. The agencies are following the lead of New Carrollton, whose police department in December became the first agency in Maryland to become certified by the District Court to issue e- citations.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Tyeesha Dixon and Melissa Harris and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporters | November 30, 2007
FREDERICK -- The Howard County flight attendant who, along with her children, was shot to death by her former husband in a Thanksgiving Day murder-suicide had twice asked Frederick County courts to confiscate his rifle - but the judges never required him to surrender it. State law requires handguns to be turned in when protective orders are issued, but not long-barreled guns, such as the .22-caliber rifle that David P. Brockdorff, 40, used to kill Gail L.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 23, 2007
NAIROBI, Kenya -- A fugitive Islamist leader praised recently by the U.S. government as a moderate who could bring much-needed public support to Somalia's transitional government has turned himself over to Kenyan authorities, U.S. officials said yesterday. Sheik Sharif Sheik Ahmed, a former teacher who rose to become chairman of the executive council of Somalia's Islamic Courts Union, is being held for questioning at a posh Nairobi hotel, the officials said. Ahmed, who functioned as de facto president of the courts, surrendered to Kenyan police Sunday at the border city of Liboi, where thousands of Somalis have been waiting to enter refugee camps.
NEWS
By COMPILED FROM SUN STAFF | December 10, 2006
A ground rent holder can file an ejectment lawsuit in Baltimore City Circuit Court to seize a house if payments are more than six months overdue, and if the holder received no response to a certified letter to the property owner's "last known address." Susan M. Marzetta, the general master for the Circuit Court's civil docket, and her staff have the job of determining whether ground rent holders and their lawyers have made reasonable efforts to find people at risk of losing their homes.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
After Edward Pinkney received a suspended sentence for possession of marijuana, he and his wife went to claim the $750 bond they had plunked down to secure his release while awaiting trial. Imagine their surprise when Baltimore court officials mistakenly cut them a check for almost $7,500."I thought it was a blessing straight from God," Mr. Pinkney said yesterday. "I was ecstatic. I didn't know what to do. I was running around like I was crazy."Now, however, Mr. Pinkney is feeling more cursed than blessed.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 4, 2001
The trial of a Baltimore social services worker accused of telling a teen-ager in his custody to leave on his own after a juvenile hearing in Howard County last fall was postponed yesterday so that court officials could request an out-of-county judge to hear the case. With witnesses in the case against Larry D. Richardson waiting in the hallway, two Howard County Circuit Court judges recused themselves during two separate hearings. They said they either knew too much about the case or were uncomfortable hearing testimony from one of the state's witnesses - a court official whose job is closely tied to the judges.
NEWS
November 30, 2006
At 10 this morning, as the court crier says, "All rise, please," and the seven judges of Maryland's Court of Appeals file into the courtroom in Annapolis, anyone with a computer should be able to tune in. The state's highest court is expected to go high-tech today with live Webcasts of oral arguments. The court's online availability is a welcome development in the administration and understanding of justice. Before today, court proceedings were open mainly to whoever could get one of the 90 available seats in the fourth-floor courtroom with historic wood paneling.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,sun reporter | September 13, 2006
Maryland's highest court refused yesterday to hear a sharply worded appeal aimed at stopping the Archdiocese of Baltimore from demolishing the Rochambeau, a 100-year-old Mount Vernon-area apartment building. The Court of Appeals order effectively ends any chance preservationists had of saving the building, which they insist is not only architecturally notable but a key piece of the Charles Street urban corridor. It also frees the archdiocese to begin tearing down the building for its prayer garden.
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