Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCourt Of Appeals
IN THE NEWS

Court Of Appeals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 31, 2003
Court of Appeals disbars Anne Arundel lawyer An Anne Arundel County lawyer was disbarred yesterday after the Court of Appeals said he wrongly disbursed thousands of dollars from escrow accounts set up for people looking to invest in transactions of the company that hired him, then lied to try to cover it up. The court disbarred Scott G. Smith of West River, who contended in part that he followed instructions of his client, the Stateline Capital Corp.,...
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The state's highest court ordered a new trial Wednesday for a former Baltimore police sergeant convicted nearly two decades ago of murdering his young mistress - a ruling that could affect cases that relied on bullet testing used for decades until being debunked. Gina Nueslein, a 22-year-old clerk at a Royal Farms, became entangled with Sgt. James Kulbicki, who was 14 years her senior, in a relationship that soured as she sued him for child support. Twenty years later, Kulbicki has a chance to demonstrate the innocence he has maintained, but Nueslein's family must experience the ordeal of her death again.
Advertisement
NEWS
March 25, 2002
The Maryland Court of Appeals has suspended the law license of a Baltimore lawyer for at least six months after finding that he failed to deliver on agreements to represent clients. William Michael Monfried charged one client for doing little or no work and neglected another client, according to the ruling. His lawyer, Gregg L. Bernstein, characterized the incidents as misunderstandings between clients and Monfried, whose career has been as a Baltimore prosecutor and defense attorney.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Robert L. Karwacki, a retired Maryland Court of Appeals judge who was president of the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners during the troubled early 1970s, died of kidney failure Monday at his Chester home. The former Mount Vernon resident was 80. He was named head of the city's school board in 1970 and assisted in the appointment of Baltimore's first African-American schools superintendent. "Brown v. the Board was years earlier; Bob was a master in maintaining educational stability," said former Baltimore Mayor Thomas J. D'Alesandro III, who named him to the school post.
NEWS
April 13, 2007
Maryland's highest court yesterday threw out the drug conviction of a 27-year-old Northwest Baltimore man, saying that city police did not have sufficient cause to stop the man's car and subsequently find marijuana. In a 4-3 decision, the Court of Appeals ruled that "police did not have an articulable reasonable suspicion to stop [Lamont Anthony] Lewis based upon the fact that he `almost' hit a police car." Lewis was parked in his sport utility vehicle near the area of Oswego Avenue and Park Heights Avenue in April 2005 when three Baltimore police officers in a patrol car - who were searching for a rape suspect - pulled up alongside his vehicle and stopped just in front.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 19, 2003
Two judges and three lawyers have been nominated to fill the Maryland Court of Appeals seat of Judge John C. Eldridge, who had to step down on reaching the mandatory retirement age of 70 last week. The Judicial Nominating Commission has forwarded to Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. the names of five of the eight applicants for the 5th Appellate Circuit seat, which includes Anne Arundel, Calvert, Charles and St. Mary's counties. The list includes judges Clayton Greene Jr., 52, and James A. Kenney III, 66, both of the Court of Special Appeals; Linda M. Schuett, 53, county attorney for Anne Arundel; and two private practice attorneys, Timothy E. Meredith, 51, and David A. Roling, 41.
NEWS
By From Staff Reports | April 16, 1994
The Maryland Court of Appeals has agreed to decide whether Baltimore Police Officer Edward T. Gorwell III can be retried for manslaughter in the shooting death last year of a teen-ager.The Baltimore state's attorney had appealed the case to the Maryland Court of Special Appeals, the state's intermediate appellate court. But the Court of Appeals, Maryland's highest court, decided to rule on whether a second trial would violate the officer's double-jeopardy protections.The seven-member panel will decide whether Baltimore Circuit Judge Ellen M. Heller made a mistake by ruling that Officer Gorwell cannot be retried for manslaughter in the April 17, 1993 death of 14-year-old Simmont Donta Thomas.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 7, 2001
The state's highest court indefinitely suspended a Dorchester County lawyer from practice yesterday, citing his repeated failure to pursue his clients' legal matters and failure to cooperate with the disciplinary investigation into his conduct. In yesterday's 6-1 ruling, the Court of Appeals said it punished Richard D. Harrington, 55, of Cambridge for "flagrant disregard of and response to communications from [the state Attorney Grievance Commission]" coupled with numerous professional conduct violations.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | January 10, 1994
There isn't much Judge John F. McAuliffe would change about his eight-year stint on the Maryland Court of Appeals. But if he could, he'd change the name of the state's highest court."
NEWS
By Phillip McGowan and Phillip McGowan,Sun reporter | December 4, 2007
Neighbors do not have the authority to stop property owners from building a 610-foot pier and bridge, the state's highest court ruled unanimously yesterday, dealing a decisive blow to a Severna Park community association. The Court of Appeals upheld a February ruling by the Court of Special Appeals, which found that Paul and Joan Gunby had the right to expect access to a Severn River cove, and that it had never been expressly denied. The case is expected to return to Anne Arundel County Circuit Court, which had sided with Olde Severna Park Improvement Association Inc., for a ruling on the issuance of a state license to allow the 410-foot bridge and connecting 200-foot pier.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
A Baltimore man convicted in the 2003 shooting deaths of two men at an Essex party was sentenced to life plus 20 years in prison Wednesday, prosecutors said. Jaron Grade, 36, was first convicted by a jury in December 2004 and sentenced to life plus 20 years, but the Maryland Court of Appeals later overturned the conviction. The panel ordered a new trial because it found that a Baltimore County judge violated Grade's rights by replacing a juror with an alternate during his trial with no input from the defense.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2014
The Court of Appeals has extended the deadline by which the state must make sure criminal defendants have lawyers by their side during bail hearings before District Court commissioners. Currently, the state provides attorneys only at hearings before judges. But the Court of Appeals ruled in September that they must be provided earlier in the process, at the initial hearings before the commissioners. State officials say that would cost $30 million a year — money they say they don't have.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
The Court of Appeals pushed back a deadline Friday for authorities in Baltimore to expand criminal defendants' access to lawyers, but one of the state's top judges said she does not expect to alter the court's underlying ruling that suspects have a right to counsel at all bail hearings. The ruling last year, which has set off a wide-ranging debate on how to handle the 175,000 or so people arrested in Maryland each year, could take effect as soon as Tuesday. District Court administrators — the defendants in the case — as well as the governor and Senate president had hoped the hearing would be a chance to reverse the ruling, which is vexing policymakers as they try to figure out a way to comply.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
Maryland's second-highest court upheld Friday a judge's ruling that the Cove Point gas facility can be converted to be used for exports, siding with the company that owns the plant and against an environmental group. The Sierra Club argued in court that a 2005 agreement between the organization and the plant's owner, Dominion, prevents it from being used as a base for sending liquefied natural gas abroad. Dominion disagreed, arguing that while the agreement did not explicitly mention exports, it did not preclude them.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2014
The state could be forced by next week to let suspected criminals in Baltimore go free until trial if it does not provide them with lawyers at the time their bail is set. A sweeping order by a city judge would accelerate the timetable for a substantial change in the pretrial release system, and Maryland's top court will consider the matter next week. State officials are wrestling with the prospect of providing public defenders for the hundreds of defendants who come before bail commissioners daily.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | September 7, 2013
Of the many words from the Maryland Court of Special Appeals in the matter of Meredith Cross v. Baltimore City Police Department, I like these best: "Costs to be paid by appellant. " That's double-good news for city taxpayers: We're on the hook for neither the back salary of a police officer who married a convicted murderer nor for the costs of bringing an audacious appeal of her firing to court. What we have here is formal affirmation that a woman has a right to marry anyone she wishes, including a gangster, but not a right to be a Baltimore cop. That was pretty much the court's conclusion Tuesday in the Cross case, echoing Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. from late-19th-century Massachusetts.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, Yvonne Wenger and Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
As he lay on the floor of his Southwest Baltimore grocery store, Benjamin Rubin's last words to his wife were "I've been shot. " Moments earlier on that April day in 1972, Welford Monroe and another young man stormed into B&S Food Market, ordered Rubin to empty his pockets and stole $125 from the cash register. Schoolchildren were huddled in the back of the store when Monroe shot Rubin in the chest. On his way out, Monroe turned and fired his gun at Shirley Rubin. She was leaning against a wire newspaper rack to steady herself when the bullet went through her arm and lodged in her hip. Shirley Rubin, now 89, has been forced to confront those memories again with the recent, unexpected release of Monroe.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.