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By SUN WASHINGTON BUREAU | November 29, 2000
WASHINGTON - For the first time in history, Americans will be able to listen to a full Supreme Court hearing on the day it happens - perhaps within an hour after it is over. The justices voted yesterday to release an audiotape "as soon as possible" after Friday's question-and-answer session in the Florida election case. That broke with the court's long-standing resistance to prompt public access to the sound of its hearings. The arrangement is not a live broadcast, but court aides said the release won't be long after the estimated 11:30 a.m. finish to the proceeding.
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NEWS
April 7, 2014
In Maryland, those arrested on the street or after police have obtained a warrant must be given a court hearing within 24 hours of being taken into custody. At that initial hearing they have a chance to learn the charges against them and to request their release pending trial. But some suspects recently have ended up waiting much longer than 24 hours before getting their first day in court, a violation of their civil rights that potentially puts the city in legal jeopardy if they later challenge their detention.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
Former NBA player Oliver J. Miller was sentenced Friday to a year in the Anne Arundel County jail for pistol-whipping his girlfriend's brother in Arnold. Miller, 41, who was living with his girlfriend in Edgewater, pleaded guilty last fall to first-degree assault and carrying a handgun. "I apologize for the wrong I've done," Miller told Anne Arundel Circuit Judge Paul A. Hackner. He said he is "just a man protecting the people I love. " The allegations stemmed from a family argument at a cookout April 17 at a friend's home.
HEALTH
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A springtime snowfall dampening their signs, if not their spirits, several hundred activists divided into opposing groups Tuesday on the plaza in front of the Supreme Court to make their own opening arguments over the Affordable Care Act. The point of contention: the law's requirement that privately owned businesses provide employees with health insurance that covers contraception. Supporters offered up call-and-response volleys of, "Pro-birth control, pro-family. " Opponents countered with the chant, "Pro-faith, pro-freedom, pro-life.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A 29-year-old man in custody on a charge of attempted robbery died in a nearby hospital after suffering a medical problem in a Baltimore courtroom Wednesday, the state corrections department confirmed. Medics took Ronnie A. Adams Jr. to Mercy Medical Center, where he died. An autopsy has been performed, according to the medical examiner's office, but investigators have not determined a cause of death. Footage captured by courtroom cameras shows Adams sitting on the courtroom's front bench shortly before 3 p.m. Wednesday, awaiting a hearing as another case played out. He appeared to be talking to a woman sitting next to him. Adams suddenly listed to his right, heaving and snorting for breath, the tape shows.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Staff writer | April 22, 1992
A shortage of clerks at the county's Circuit Court office has created a backlog of paperwork. The result? Court files are incomplete, routine services are delayed and defendants sit in jail longer than usual, waiting for bond hearing dates.Since January 1991, the clerk'soffice has lost seven employees. One more will depart at the end of the month, leaving a staff of 27. The vacant positions have remained unfilled because of state hiring freezes and budget cuts.Meanwhile, caseloads have increased.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2002
Maryland's new legislative map might look odd, but there is a logic behind the squiggles and protrusions that protects voting strength in Baltimore and bolsters minority voices statewide, one of the redistricting plan's chief architects argued in court yesterday. Secretary of State John T. Willis, a lawyer, historian and ally of Gov. Parris N. Glendening, defended the most notable idiosyncrasies in the governor's redistricting plan during the second day of a court hearing in Annapolis.
NEWS
November 20, 2000
WASHINGTON - In a grand Greek revival-style building in downtown Tallahassee, featuring a rotunda of eight columns of Maryland Verde antique marble surrounding a seal with a motto translated as "Soon enough if done rightly," the Florida Supreme Court will meet today in emergency session. A hearing, due to be televised nationally, could lead to a decision settling the presidential election. The Sun's Lyle Denniston explores the event. What will happen today? Beginning at 2 p.m., the court's seven justices will hear at least eight lawyers argue the pending cases.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | November 2, 2004
A 12-year-old Baltimore girl accused in the beating of a 4-year old boy had been given significant caretaker responsibilities, police said yesterday. Besides babysitting the boy, she was also watching a baby when the beating occurred, according to the victim's grandmother. The girl, whose name is being withheld by The Sun because of her age, appeared at a juvenile court hearing yesterday where she was ordered to remain in custody until her Dec. 8 trial. The case has stunned police and prosecutors because of the ages of the victim and the accused, and because the suspect is a girl.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | December 16, 2006
The 26-year-old nurse was heading for a night shift Jan. 27, 1985, at a downtown Baltimore hospital when she was raped and stabbed - slashed so brutally that she was nearly decapitated. Now, almost 22 years later, city police believe they have identified her killer - a man who has been in prison all along. Orrell Youmans, 50, was arrested June 30, 1985, and charged in another city rape case, court records show. He is serving a 40-year sentence at Eastern Correctional Institute and, according to a court document, has a release date of 2015.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
A 29-year-old man in custody on a charge of attempted robbery died in a nearby hospital after suffering a medical problem in a Baltimore courtroom Wednesday, the state corrections department confirmed. Medics took Ronnie A. Adams Jr. to Mercy Medical Center, where he died. An autopsy has been performed, according to the medical examiner's office, but investigators have not determined a cause of death. Footage captured by courtroom cameras shows Adams sitting on the courtroom's front bench shortly before 3 p.m. Wednesday, awaiting a hearing as another case played out. He appeared to be talking to a woman sitting next to him. Adams suddenly listed to his right, heaving and snorting for breath, the tape shows.
NEWS
By David G. Savage, Tribune Washington Bureau and High court to take up contraception issue | November 26, 2013
- The Supreme Court agreed Tuesday to jump into a growing legal dispute between businesses run by conservative Christians and the Obama administration over whether a company must pay for birth control drugs that conflict with its owner's religious beliefs. The decision to hear the case, which could affect millions of women with employer-provided health plans, means that for a second time, the justices will decide the fate of a key part of President Barack Obama's health care law. Last year, the court in a 5-4 decision upheld the requirement that individuals obtain basic health insurance or pay a tax penalty.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Few of the officers assigned to Baltimore County's Woodlawn Precinct ever met Sgt. Bruce A. Prothero, but they all know his story. Every day, they pass pictures of the officer and his family as they walk through the station's halls. One image shows his daughter, Holly, wearing his cap and seated at his desk the day his wife came to clean it out for the last time. Prothero died 13 years ago, shot three times responding to a jewelry store robbery while working a second job as a security guard.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
A lawyer for John Joseph Merzbacher, a former Catholic school teacher imprisoned for raping a student decades ago, has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his case after a federal appeals court rejected an earlier argument that he should be set free. In a 21-page petition, Merzbacher's attorney H. Mark Stichel asks the high court to resolve several legal questions, including whether a defendant's claim that he would have taken a plea deal if offered, even while proclaiming his innocence, demonstrates a "reasonable probability" that he would have followed through.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2013
In a Maryland case that's garnered the attention of the other 49 states, the federal Department of Justice and the national science community, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments Tuesday over whether to restrict police in collecting DNA to solve crimes. The justices will rule on a police practice common in Maryland: taking genetic information from individuals arrested — but not convicted — to link them to unsolved crimes. In the past, the court has acknowledged the power of DNA but has not allowed it to run afoul of fundamental American rights such as the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2013
A judge on Wednesday lifted a ban prohibiting political activist Kim A. Trueheart from entering City Hall — and she promptly returned to the building, where she attended the mayor's news conference. At a District Court hearing Wednesday morning, Trueheart, 55, of Baltimore rejected a deal that would have put her misdemeanor trespassing and disorderly conduct charges on an inactive docket. Trueheart said she did nothing wrong and wanted the opportunity to be cleared of wrongdoing.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 22, 2004
FORT BRAGG, N.C. - The first public court hearing for Pfc. Lynndie R. England was postponed yesterday until mid-July, signaling possible plea negotiations that could allow the young woman who became one of the most visible faces in the Iraqi prison abuse scandal to avoid a military trial. Asked in a brief phone interview yesterday whether she was involved in plea talks, an attorney for England said: "Yes, I have been." But the Colorado-based lawyer, Rose Mary Zapor, quickly amended her remarks to say she would not comment.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Glenn Small and Marcia Myers and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writers | March 23, 1994
A federal judge has granted the request of a death row inmate who sought to videotape John Thanos' execution as possible evidence that Maryland's gas chamber poses cruel and unusual punishment.But the issue will become moot if legislation authorizing lethal injection as a second form of execution is signed into law, as expected later this week.The written order, signed by U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis, affirms an earlier oral ruling that was contingent on his first-hand inspection of the gas chamber.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Maryland's highest court upheld Gov. Martin O'Malley's new legislative redistricting map on Friday morning. The Court of Appeals issued an order, but no opinion, denying the claims in three challenges. The order comes only two days after the challenges were argued in court. The order said the judges found the plan, which will take effect with the 2014 elections, passed constitutional muster. The new map shifts the districts of Baltimore County Democratic Sens. James Brochin – whose new district is majority Republican – and Delores Kelley, both of whom objected to the plan.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
The Exxon Mobil Corp. asked Maryland's highest court Monday to erase most of the more than $1.5 billion awarded in two lawsuits over a large gasoline spill that Jacksonville residents claimed polluted their well water, left them fearful of getting cancer and made their property worthless. The oil giant's attorneys asked that new trials be held only on property value issues. That would leave the corporation and homeowners to argue over which homeowners to compensate for losses in property value.
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