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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
A judge from Prince George's County has been named the next chief judge of the state's District Court. Judge John P. Morrissey, 49, who has served as an associate judge since 2005, will succeed District Court Chief Judge Ben C. Clyburn when Clyburn retires next month. Morrissey, who was born in Washington, D.C. and has lived in P.G. County for more than 40 years, will oversee the court's 34 locations and nearly 2,000 employees, including 116 state judges. The court is typically the first point of contact for members of the public who interact with the state courts system.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
After a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling, Maryland election officials said Friday that they will no longer enforce a state law that imposes an overall limit of $10,000 on campaign contributions in a four-year election cycle. State officials said they would continue to enforce a Maryland law limiting individuals to contributing no more than $4,000 to a particular candidate during an election cycle. Donors, however, are now free to give $4,000 to as many candidates as desired. Without the limit, moneyed donors are likely to give more - or be asked to give more - and lower-profile races are more likely to get their attention.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
Dan Rodricks ' May 1st column ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk") effectively condemns all pit bulls to death. It demonstrates how fear combined with ignorance can lead to prejudice. It's too bad that Mr. Rodricks, who has spent years trying to counteract this phenomenon among others, does not recognize it in himself. Jeanne Bilanin, Baltimore
NEWS
March 2, 2010
The escape of a convicted murderer from a Maryland prison serves as a way to highlight the severe waste of both time and money in the judicial branch of government. Why must we move a convict's body to a new place to attend a court hearing? This could be done very inexpensively via Skype or any other teleconference service that allows the accused to have his/her day in court without the enormous expense, time and risks of physically moving a prisoner from place to place. When you multiply this movement to and from court hundreds (or more)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
The state senator accused of bribery is set to make his first appearance in federal court at a hearing Sept. 17. Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat, is expected to plead not guilty. The senator was indicted last week for allegedly accepting $245,000 in payments from Shoppers Food Warehouse in exchange for his help removing state bureaucratic hurdles. He stepped down from his position as chair of the senate's Budget and Taxation Committee to focus on his defense.
SPORTS
December 21, 2010
NJIT at Maryland When: Tonight, 8 Radio: 105.7 FM, 1300 AM Outlook: The Terps (7-4) return to action after a 10-day layoff with the Highlanders (2-6), who have not won on the road this season. Maryland has been led by sophomore Jordan Williams, who has nine double-doubles this season and five in a row. Senior Dino Gregory leads the Terps in blocks (19) and steals (14). "I think Dino, first of all, has done a great job for us," Maryland coach Gary Williams said Tuesday, according to the university website.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
NEWS THAT Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has highlighted the important connection between presidential politics and the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court has been little more than an afterthought in a campaign dominated by terrorism, the war in Iraq and the economy, its lasting impact on important issues should reinforce for Americans on both sides of the ideological divide what's at stake in this election. The current court has not changed in a decade, allowing for one of the most stable periods in the court's history.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | June 22, 1993
The Supreme Court issued a series of orders yesterday with these results:CASES TO BE HEARDWorkplace bias. The court agreed to decide, at its next term starting in October, whether a company will be excused for firing a worker because of sex, race, religion or ethnic identity, if the company discovers later that there was a good reason to justify the firing. The issue arises in the case of a "campus cop" at a small college in Michigan who claimed she was fired because she was a woman. Although that firing was ruled illegal, a federal appeals court said the woman suffered no legal wrong because the company learned later that she had lied on her original job application.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man who was found guilty of a burglary based in part on DNA evidence asked a state appellate court Thursday to throw out his conviction, arguing that police improperly kept his genetic information in the database they used to link him to a Coke can from the crime scene. George Varriale, 46, gave a DNA sample to Anne Arundel County police in 2012 as they were investigating a reported rape. The sample did not link him to that crime, but police later used it to place him at the 2008 burglary of a Glen Burnie business.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The belief that legislation can curb obscenely large contributions to individual candidates for office may be hopeful, but not realistic ( "A win for billionaires," April 6). Ever since our nation was founded, candidates favored by a wealthy few have received funds and are expected to vote the "right" way. Certainly, President Barack Obama during his two election campaigns refused to accept governmental funding and went to rich individuals to support his election and reelection.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 9, 2014
Last week a majority of the Supreme Court decided that the First Amendment protects the right of individuals to pour as much as $3.6 million into a political party or $800,000 into a political campaign. The court said such spending doesn't corrupt democracy. That's utter baloney, as anyone who has the faintest familiarity with contemporary American politics well knows. The McCutcheon v. FEC decision would be less troubling were the distribution of income and wealth in America more equal.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
I was pleased to read The Sun's editorial against the Supreme Court's wrongheaded decision in McCutcheon v. FEC ( "A win for the billionaires," April 6). I'm to hoping that this decision serves as a spark for change. The court's decision to eliminate federal limits on the total amount of money that mega-donors can contribute during an election cycle empowers a tiny group of fewer than 3,000 elite donors to spend an additional billion dollars in our elections through 2020. This isn't the way it should be. In our democracy, the size of your wallet shouldn't determine the strength of your voice in our political system.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
A Pasadena man pleaded guilty in federal court Tuesday to tipping off a major cocaine dealer that his phone was being monitored after learning about the tap from a local court official. Last June, Joshua Ferguson, 34, found out from a friend who worked at the Anne Arundel County Circuit Court that authorities were conducting a wiretap investigation, and the next day called one of the targets of the investigation to warn him. The court employee, Sarah Harris, 23, had learned about the investigation when a Drug Enforcement Administration task force officer came in to file applications for other electronic surveillance in the case.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 7, 2014
Forty years ago, Congress enacted sweeping limits on political campaign spending in the wake of a shocking disclosure that one man - Chicago insurance executive W. Clement Stone - had given more than $3 million for the 1972 reelection of President Richard M. Nixon. The amount seemed outlandish then, in a campaign in which Nixon waltzed to victory over his Democratic opponent, Sen. George McGovern, winning 49 states and losing only Massachusetts and the District of Columbia. It was an easily predictable drubbing.
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Anyone who has been involved in a divorce proceeding, or been part of a child custody hearing, or watched in frustration as a juvenile delinquent and his family get shuffled through the courts has seen firsthand that cases involving family, domestic and juvenile law get short shrift in Maryland.A blue-ribbon commission appointed by the governor has come up with a sound recommendation, but one that will require effort, thorough planning and probably more money -- a separate court to handle domestic and juvenile cases.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
In Maryland, those arrested on the street or after police have obtained a warrant must be given a court hearing within 24 hours of being taken into custody. At that initial hearing they have a chance to learn the charges against them and to request their release pending trial. But some suspects recently have ended up waiting much longer than 24 hours before getting their first day in court, a violation of their civil rights that potentially puts the city in legal jeopardy if they later challenge their detention.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
With lawmakers still far apart on how to overhaul Maryland's bail system, legislative leaders and the O'Malley administration have cobbled together a short-term fix that involves an executive order and recruiting private attorneys for little or no pay to represent poor defendants. At the direction of legislative leaders, a joint House and Senate committee has set aside $10 million in the state budget to address a ruling by Maryland's highest court that the current bail system is unconstitutional because it fails to provide lawyers early enough in the process.
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