Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCourt
IN THE NEWS

Court

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A 19-year-old honors student convicted of strangling his girlfriend and burying her in a shallow grave because she broke up with him was sentenced in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Adnan Masud Syed maintained his innocence at his sentencing on first-degree murder and kidnapping convictions, even as his attorney asked Judge Wanda K. Heard for mercy when punishing Syed because the killing was "a crime of passion." "He made a bad decision," Syed's attorney, Charles H. Dorsey III, told Heard.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 13, 2014
I fully agree with commentator Ned Holstein's view that parenthood generally should be shared (" Joint custody should be the rule, not the exception," Oct. 8). As a father of two who fights for his children only because their mother wishes to control them, the courts all to often allow this to happen to great quality dads. Fathers are being cut out of our children's lives for the financial gain of others - mothers and their attorneys. Joe Phillips - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | October 11, 2014
Three points need to be made about Monday's  decision by the Supreme Court not to decide whether the equal protection clause of the Constitution grants people of the same sex the right to marry. Point 1: While the court's liberal wing probably wanted to accept cases banning same-sex marriage in five states that have been overturned by three different federal appeals courts in recent months, the conservative majority, along with swing Justice Anthony Kennedy, apparently wished to see states resolve the issue.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
Dan Rodricks ' May 1st column ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk") effectively condemns all pit bulls to death. It demonstrates how fear combined with ignorance can lead to prejudice. It's too bad that Mr. Rodricks, who has spent years trying to counteract this phenomenon among others, does not recognize it in himself. Jeanne Bilanin, Baltimore
NEWS
March 2, 2010
The escape of a convicted murderer from a Maryland prison serves as a way to highlight the severe waste of both time and money in the judicial branch of government. Why must we move a convict's body to a new place to attend a court hearing? This could be done very inexpensively via Skype or any other teleconference service that allows the accused to have his/her day in court without the enormous expense, time and risks of physically moving a prisoner from place to place. When you multiply this movement to and from court hundreds (or more)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
The state senator accused of bribery is set to make his first appearance in federal court at a hearing Sept. 17. Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat, is expected to plead not guilty. The senator was indicted last week for allegedly accepting $245,000 in payments from Shoppers Food Warehouse in exchange for his help removing state bureaucratic hurdles. He stepped down from his position as chair of the senate's Budget and Taxation Committee to focus on his defense.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
NEWS THAT Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has highlighted the important connection between presidential politics and the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court has been little more than an afterthought in a campaign dominated by terrorism, the war in Iraq and the economy, its lasting impact on important issues should reinforce for Americans on both sides of the ideological divide what's at stake in this election. The current court has not changed in a decade, allowing for one of the most stable periods in the court's history.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | June 22, 1993
The Supreme Court issued a series of orders yesterday with these results:CASES TO BE HEARDWorkplace bias. The court agreed to decide, at its next term starting in October, whether a company will be excused for firing a worker because of sex, race, religion or ethnic identity, if the company discovers later that there was a good reason to justify the firing. The issue arises in the case of a "campus cop" at a small college in Michigan who claimed she was fired because she was a woman. Although that firing was ruled illegal, a federal appeals court said the woman suffered no legal wrong because the company learned later that she had lied on her original job application.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | October 9, 2014
Our topic du jour: the latest stunning milestone in the march toward gay equality. No, the other stunning milestone. We will get around to what the Supreme Court did (more accurately, declined to do) in a moment. But first: Have you seen the new Cheerios commercial? It broke out online a few days ago, a spot starring these two gay French Canadian men and their adopted daughter, a brown-skinned (African-Canadian?) toddler named Raphaelle. In the three-minute clip, Andre and Jonathan talk about the love at first sight blind date that brought them together and how they thought they could never be dads because they are gay. All the while, Raphaelle is squirming, eating Cheerios, leaning from one father to the other and otherwise committing shameless acts of cuteness.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Marriage equality took one of its biggest leaps forward today without anything happening at all. By deciding not to hear any of the same-sex marriage cases appealed to it, the Supreme Court immediately voided bans on gay marriage in five more states - Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia, Indiana and Wisconsin - and likely did so in six others that are part of the same appellate circuits. It was the largest number of states to realize marriage equality on one day, topping the three (including Maryland)
SPORTS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Some call the Flag Court the party deck, and the general-admission patio above right field fit the description as delirious fans traded high-fives, started chants, drained beverages and hollered at Tigers players 90 minutes before game time. But beneath the levity was a quiet battle for terrain. Brian Mills of Hagerstown, in his best Oriole-orange mohawk, sunglasses, beads and dyed beard, arrived three hours before the gates opened but still found himself in the second row. He stood pretty much in the same spot near the right-field foul pole two years ago as the Orioles faced the Yankees in a playoff game, but that time he'd made his way to the fence.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Walter Evan Black Jr., a retired chief judge of the U.S. District Court for Maryland who ruled against the city of Baltimore in its efforts to acquire the Colts after the team moved to Indianapolis, died of complications from Parkinson's disease Monday at his Easton home. The former Roland Park-area resident was 88. During a lengthy career, he ruled against Baltimore in 1985 when it attempted to acquire the Colts football franchise by condemnation. In his ruling, he said the city did not have the power to take the franchise because the team had moved on the night of March 29, 1984, before the day the city had filed its suit.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
The U.S. Supreme Court is meeting on Monday for the first time since June, and could make a decision to hear a new same-sex marriage case. On the justices' agenda for the closed-door conference are appeals to cases in Indiana, Oklahoma, Utah, Virginia and Wisconsin, won by gay couples that favor a Supreme Court decision on their lower court victories. Four out of nine justices would have to vote to take up any particular case , and they are under no obligation to do so and could hold off on deciding whether to consider one of the cases until a later conference.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Ravens cornerback Jimmy Smith has been assigned an Oct. 7 court date at Towson District Court for his misdemeanor disorderly conduct case, according to Baltimore County police spokesman Shawn Vinson. Smith was charged with failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement officer on July 12 when he was arrested by police and given a citation following an incident at The Greene Turtle in Towson. According to Maryland criminal law code Section 10-201 governing disturbing the peace and disorderly conduct, which includes willfully failing to obey a reasonable and lawful order from a law enforcement officer, those convicted of violating this law are subject to a maximum punishment of 60 days in jail or a fine not exceeding $500, or both penalties.
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Anyone who has been involved in a divorce proceeding, or been part of a child custody hearing, or watched in frustration as a juvenile delinquent and his family get shuffled through the courts has seen firsthand that cases involving family, domestic and juvenile law get short shrift in Maryland.A blue-ribbon commission appointed by the governor has come up with a sound recommendation, but one that will require effort, thorough planning and probably more money -- a separate court to handle domestic and juvenile cases.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Attorneys for a Baltimore police officer accused of slitting the throat of a shar-pei in June took the rare step Wednesday of writing an outside-the-court letter directly to Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, asking him to drop the case. The attorneys for Officer Jeffrey Bolger argue the case was filed prematurely amid a storm of public criticism and a pre-investigatory rush to react by police and prosecutors, and that information uncovered since clears Bolger of wrongdoing.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.