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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Attorneys for a Baltimore police officer accused of slitting the throat of a shar-pei in June took the rare step Wednesday of writing an outside-the-court letter directly to Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein, asking him to drop the case. The attorneys for Officer Jeffrey Bolger argue the case was filed prematurely amid a storm of public criticism and a pre-investigatory rush to react by police and prosecutors, and that information uncovered since clears Bolger of wrongdoing.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
In 1936, the owners of Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore built a manor home on more than 54 acres in Howard County that once belonged to the descendants of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. That property at 3925 Folly Quarter Road in Ellicott City is now for sale for $7 million. "I call this one of the prime, principal properties of Howard County, sitting on one of the highest elevations there," said listing agent Creig Northrop, of the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
Dan Rodricks ' May 1st column ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk") effectively condemns all pit bulls to death. It demonstrates how fear combined with ignorance can lead to prejudice. It's too bad that Mr. Rodricks, who has spent years trying to counteract this phenomenon among others, does not recognize it in himself. Jeanne Bilanin, Baltimore
NEWS
March 2, 2010
The escape of a convicted murderer from a Maryland prison serves as a way to highlight the severe waste of both time and money in the judicial branch of government. Why must we move a convict's body to a new place to attend a court hearing? This could be done very inexpensively via Skype or any other teleconference service that allows the accused to have his/her day in court without the enormous expense, time and risks of physically moving a prisoner from place to place. When you multiply this movement to and from court hundreds (or more)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
The state senator accused of bribery is set to make his first appearance in federal court at a hearing Sept. 17. Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat, is expected to plead not guilty. The senator was indicted last week for allegedly accepting $245,000 in payments from Shoppers Food Warehouse in exchange for his help removing state bureaucratic hurdles. He stepped down from his position as chair of the senate's Budget and Taxation Committee to focus on his defense.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
NEWS THAT Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has highlighted the important connection between presidential politics and the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court has been little more than an afterthought in a campaign dominated by terrorism, the war in Iraq and the economy, its lasting impact on important issues should reinforce for Americans on both sides of the ideological divide what's at stake in this election. The current court has not changed in a decade, allowing for one of the most stable periods in the court's history.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | June 22, 1993
The Supreme Court issued a series of orders yesterday with these results:CASES TO BE HEARDWorkplace bias. The court agreed to decide, at its next term starting in October, whether a company will be excused for firing a worker because of sex, race, religion or ethnic identity, if the company discovers later that there was a good reason to justify the firing. The issue arises in the case of a "campus cop" at a small college in Michigan who claimed she was fired because she was a woman. Although that firing was ruled illegal, a federal appeals court said the woman suffered no legal wrong because the company learned later that she had lied on her original job application.
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Anyone who has been involved in a divorce proceeding, or been part of a child custody hearing, or watched in frustration as a juvenile delinquent and his family get shuffled through the courts has seen firsthand that cases involving family, domestic and juvenile law get short shrift in Maryland.A blue-ribbon commission appointed by the governor has come up with a sound recommendation, but one that will require effort, thorough planning and probably more money -- a separate court to handle domestic and juvenile cases.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
Baltimore County police continue to search for the second suspect in a double killing in Rosedale last month. Charles William Mitter, 39, and Tyray Avia Wise, 26, were stabbed more than 70 times in a dispute over $25,000, investigators wrote in court documents. Mitter also was shot several times. Police charged Carlos Lomax, 45, a few days after the killings. But police said Lomax, who is Mitter's stepbrother, had an accomplice. The second suspect is described only as a black man, 5-foot-7 to 5-foot-8, wearing a black jumpsuit with white socks, according to charging documents filed in District Court.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
The two men vying to be Maryland's next governor brought their stump speeches to a convention of municipal leaders in Annapolis on Friday, each promising they would offer local officials a better way forward than their opponent. Republican Larry Hogan told the group of mayors and local elected officials that troubles in their jurisdictions stem from the economic policies of the two-term O'Malley-Brown administration. "The mismanagement of our state over the past eight years has had a real impact on each and every one of you," Hogan said at the Maryland Municipal League.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
Developer Patrick Turner again put off possible foreclosure on the South Baltimore waterfront he wants to redevelop as the parties agreed Monday in backruptcy court to an Oct. 24 hearing on all matters in the case. The delay gives Turner's Inner Harbor West LLC another month or so to attempt to come to terms with creditor Westport Property Investments LLC, which had asked the court to lift the automatic stay triggered by the bankruptcy that blocks foreclosure. If Turner and his creditors don't reach agreement before then, Judge Robert A. Gordon could be asked to decide the fate of Turner's aspiration to turn 43 acres on the Patapsco River into a project including homes, stores, hotels, a high-rise building and a park.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
The air of seeming inevitability that had developed around the idea of a successful constitutional challenge to state bans on gay marriage was punctured Wednesday by a federal judge in Louisiana. After 21 consecutive decisions favoring marriage equality in federal district and appellate courts since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act, federal District Judge Martin L. C. Feldman upheld the ban on same-sex marriage that Louisiana voters overwhelmingly supported in 2004.
NEWS
By Catherine Rentz, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Marc B. Noren, a family law attorney and former manager for the Civil Division of the Clerk's Office of the Baltimore City Circuit Court, died of respiratory failure on Aug. 25, at his home in Pikesville. He was 59 and had suffered for several years from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD. Mr. Noren was a fixture in the Baltimore City court system and family law circles, having begun his career at the age of 19 at the Baltimore City clerk's office. By age 22, he was a leader in one of the civil courts.
NEWS
James O'Conor Gentry Jr | September 2, 2014
As one of two former prosecutors in the 1995 murder trial of then-police Sgt. James Kulbicki (" Ex-Baltimore Police sergeant granted new trial in murder of mistress," Aug. 27), I was outraged and incredulous to learn that the Court of Appeals of Maryland has, for the second time, reversed the conviction of a man who was tied by overwhelming evidence to the senseless and brutal execution of an innocent, young woman more than 19 years ago. Two juries have already found that on January 9, 1993, Gina Nueslein, just 22 years old at the time, was shot in the head by Sgt. Kulbicki for daring to ask him to provide child support for their 18-month old son. Evidence showed the police veteran abducted Nueslein and, as she sat in his pick-up truck, placed the barrel of his gun against her head and pulled the trigger.
NEWS
October 2, 2006
The U.S. Supreme Court starts another new term today, with all justices in place. The newest members, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who was confirmed in time to open the term last year, and Samuel A. Alito Jr., who joined in midterm, seem settled in and have lined up with conservative Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas pretty much as expected. Justices John Paul Stevens, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David H. Souter and Stephen G. Breyer tend to be on the other side, and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy has stepped into the swing vote role played so long by retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
A man convicted in a 2010 fatal shooting at a Hess gas station in exchange for $9,000 argued unsuccessfully that he should get a new trial because the judge in his case had once been the target in a similar scheme. The Court of Special Appeals upheld Walter P. Bishop Jr.'s conviction in an opinion announced Tuesday. Bishop, now 32, was convicted and sentenced to two consecutive life sentences plus 20 years for shooting William "Ray" Porter at a Joppa Road gas station in Towson on March 1, 2010.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Val Jean Slowinski, a retired Towson University professor who had been active for more than two decades with the Cockpit in Court Theater in Essex, died Wednesday at Atlantic General Hospital in Berlin of a stroke. She was 78. The former Val Jean Sytko was born in Newark, N.J., and raised in Irvington, N.J., where she graduated in 1953 from Irvington High School. In 1957, she graduated from Kean University, formerly Newark State Teachers College, and later earned a master's degree in speech pathology and audiology at what is now Loyola University Maryland.
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