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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 20, 2014
Baltimore Immigration Court, facing an increase in the number of cases involving immigrant children who crossed the border illegally, is expediting reviews to more quickly decide whether the children should be deported, according to attorneys with clients before the court. The so-called "rocket docket," created in response to a directive last month from the Obama administration to fast-track the cases, has meant the children receive initial hearings within 21 days and in some cases are given a matter of weeks, instead of months, to find an attorney.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A 19-year-old man has been charged in a Northwest Baltimore double shooting that injured two men in late July, Baltimore police say. Michael Pickett, 19, of 603 E 38th St., faces attempted murder, assault and weapons charges after Baltimore police say he shot two men sitting in a 2000 Saturn on July 30 in the 5000 block of Gwynn Oak Ave. in Howard Park. Police say a 22-year-old man was shot in the chest and lower back while a 27-year-old man was shot in the right arm. Witnesses identified Pickett as a person of interest in the shooting and he was arrested after a photo lineup, detectives wrote in charging documents.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
Dan Rodricks ' May 1st column ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk") effectively condemns all pit bulls to death. It demonstrates how fear combined with ignorance can lead to prejudice. It's too bad that Mr. Rodricks, who has spent years trying to counteract this phenomenon among others, does not recognize it in himself. Jeanne Bilanin, Baltimore
NEWS
March 2, 2010
The escape of a convicted murderer from a Maryland prison serves as a way to highlight the severe waste of both time and money in the judicial branch of government. Why must we move a convict's body to a new place to attend a court hearing? This could be done very inexpensively via Skype or any other teleconference service that allows the accused to have his/her day in court without the enormous expense, time and risks of physically moving a prisoner from place to place. When you multiply this movement to and from court hundreds (or more)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
The state senator accused of bribery is set to make his first appearance in federal court at a hearing Sept. 17. Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat, is expected to plead not guilty. The senator was indicted last week for allegedly accepting $245,000 in payments from Shoppers Food Warehouse in exchange for his help removing state bureaucratic hurdles. He stepped down from his position as chair of the senate's Budget and Taxation Committee to focus on his defense.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
NEWS THAT Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has highlighted the important connection between presidential politics and the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court has been little more than an afterthought in a campaign dominated by terrorism, the war in Iraq and the economy, its lasting impact on important issues should reinforce for Americans on both sides of the ideological divide what's at stake in this election. The current court has not changed in a decade, allowing for one of the most stable periods in the court's history.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | June 22, 1993
The Supreme Court issued a series of orders yesterday with these results:CASES TO BE HEARDWorkplace bias. The court agreed to decide, at its next term starting in October, whether a company will be excused for firing a worker because of sex, race, religion or ethnic identity, if the company discovers later that there was a good reason to justify the firing. The issue arises in the case of a "campus cop" at a small college in Michigan who claimed she was fired because she was a woman. Although that firing was ruled illegal, a federal appeals court said the woman suffered no legal wrong because the company learned later that she had lied on her original job application.
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Anyone who has been involved in a divorce proceeding, or been part of a child custody hearing, or watched in frustration as a juvenile delinquent and his family get shuffled through the courts has seen firsthand that cases involving family, domestic and juvenile law get short shrift in Maryland.A blue-ribbon commission appointed by the governor has come up with a sound recommendation, but one that will require effort, thorough planning and probably more money -- a separate court to handle domestic and juvenile cases.
NEWS
August 17, 2014
The most popular rifle in America is the AR-15, which looks like M-16 but does not operate like one. Maryland's legislature banned the look in spite of fact that the function never matched ( "Federal judge upholds assault rifle ban," Aug. 12). Science and records say assault rifles are seldom involved in crime. Research and common sense says good guys with guns save lives. While cops are usually good guys, their failure rate is high. Maryland put almost 60 bad cops in jail over the last two years.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
The Orioles' dispute with Major League Baseball over television rights fees casts the franchise in a familiar role as a challenger to the baseball establishment. About a decade ago, the Orioles opposed the proposed relocation of the Montreal Expos to Washington, a city that had been exclusive Orioles television and marketing territory since 1972, when the Senators moved to Dallas and became the Texas Rangers. After bruising negotiations and the threat of litigation by the Baltimore team, baseball reached an agreement with the Orioles giving the club control of the regional television network it shares with the Nationals as compensation for the loss of territory.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Baltimore City Circuit Court judge has ordered an absentee Baltimore landlord to clean up about 50 blighted properties within 90 days, the first ruling since a state law was amended two years ago to make it easier for community groups to sue the owners of problem properties. Judge Pamela J. White found that 49 properties owned by Scott Wizig and corporate affiliates represented legal nuisances, with "unsafe and uninhabitable" conditions that have not been fixed despite requests by community groups and notices of violations of the building code.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
The Baltimore Orioles took an early lead in the court battle against the Washington Nationals and Major League Baseball over television rights fees from the teams' shared regional sports network. A New York court temporarily blocked a recent Major League Baseball decision that would have diverted tens of millions of dollars in profits from the regional network MASN that flow primarily to the Orioles. The Orioles say that money is critical to maintaining competitiveness and affording quality players.
NEWS
By Thomas Maronick Jr | August 6, 2014
A decision last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, upholding federal regulations requiring that meat labels state where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered, is a win for consumers, public health and American meat producers. It means that mystery meat from third-world sweat shops will be far less de rigueur for the discerning public, along with the substantial health risks associated with food from questionable sources. As detailed in a number of books - particularly Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle" (1906)
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 6, 2014
A federal appeals court on Wednesday upheld Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's overhaul of Baltimore's police and fire pension system, but left open avenues for the unions to keep fighting. "I'm certainly pleased with the court's ruling," Rawlings-Blake said of the decision. City officials say it cut about $400 million in pension costs by reducing benefits, raising the retirement age and requiring higher contributions from workers. "It was not something any of us wanted to do," the mayor said.
NEWS
October 2, 2006
The U.S. Supreme Court starts another new term today, with all justices in place. The newest members, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who was confirmed in time to open the term last year, and Samuel A. Alito Jr., who joined in midterm, seem settled in and have lined up with conservative Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas pretty much as expected. Justices John Paul Stevens, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David H. Souter and Stephen G. Breyer tend to be on the other side, and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy has stepped into the swing vote role played so long by retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
The Orioles and Washington Nationals are embroiled in a dispute - which might need to be resolved in court or by independent arbitration - over the economics of their shared regional television network. The outcome could affect how much money the Orioles have to spend on players and the team's profits. The conflict hinges in part on the interpretation of a 2005 agreement under which the Orioles ceded the Washington market as the team's exclusive domain but were permitted control of the Mid-Atlantic Sports Network, which broadcasts both clubs' games Here are seven things to know about the flap: What is at the core of the dispute?
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | July 31, 2014
In the next few months, it will be a snap to find entertainment news and venues in Towson thanks to the Towson Chamber of Commerce. The chamber is designing an online application, a one-stop shop of everything you want to know about what's happening, who's doing it and how to get there in downtown Towson. The application, downloadable for smart phones and android devices, will be free to users and to the businesses, chamber members or not, that will be in it. Brooke Bianchetti, assistant to the chamber executive director, is designing the app. "We expect to launch it in the next two to three months," she said of the approximately $10,000 to $12,000 project.
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