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NEWS
June 10, 2013
Your editorial about phone record surveillance was certainly thought-provoking ("Surveillance state," June 7). What is of most concern about our government is the top-secret court that, we now know, actually exists. Where in a democratic republic is there justification for any top-secret court? Joy Shillman, Baltimore
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NEWS
July 22, 2014
In a letter in the Sun, Kelli Kirchner of Cumberland expresses her happiness with the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and seems to believe no one should question or try to change it ( "Why is Mikulski trying to 'fix' the Supreme Court decision?" July 20). Well, I have news for her. As long as we have freedom of speech (as protected by the First Amendment to the Constitution), we will always be free to question and try to change (via legislation or constitutional amendment) any decision of any court.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
State officials have announced the addition of the first new judgeships since 1977 for the Court of Special Appeals, the state's second-highest court. Lawyers and judges can begin to apply for the two newly created seats. Appointments by Gov. Martin O'Malley will bring the number of special appeals judges to 15. Applications are due in by Aug. 7 and the panel that advises O'Malley will begin screening candidates after that. In the past 35 years, the court's workload has grown by nearly 40 percent and individual judges' caseloads by nearly 42 percent, according to the Department of Legislative Services.
NEWS
July 20, 2014
On her website, Sen. Barbara Mikulski proclaims that she is joining other senators to introduce a "legislative fix to protect women's health" following the Supreme Court's recent decision in the Hobby Lobby case. Whether you are for abortion or against abortion, whether you think your employer should cover all birth control or not, whether you are a women or a man, this bill should bother you. Why? Because our Founding Fathers created three branches of government to check and balance each other.
NEWS
May 1, 2012
Dan Rodricks ' May 1st column ("Pit bulls: Own at your risk") effectively condemns all pit bulls to death. It demonstrates how fear combined with ignorance can lead to prejudice. It's too bad that Mr. Rodricks, who has spent years trying to counteract this phenomenon among others, does not recognize it in himself. Jeanne Bilanin, Baltimore
NEWS
March 2, 2010
The escape of a convicted murderer from a Maryland prison serves as a way to highlight the severe waste of both time and money in the judicial branch of government. Why must we move a convict's body to a new place to attend a court hearing? This could be done very inexpensively via Skype or any other teleconference service that allows the accused to have his/her day in court without the enormous expense, time and risks of physically moving a prisoner from place to place. When you multiply this movement to and from court hundreds (or more)
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2010
The state senator accused of bribery is set to make his first appearance in federal court at a hearing Sept. 17. Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat, is expected to plead not guilty. The senator was indicted last week for allegedly accepting $245,000 in payments from Shoppers Food Warehouse in exchange for his help removing state bureaucratic hurdles. He stepped down from his position as chair of the senate's Budget and Taxation Committee to focus on his defense.
NEWS
October 28, 2004
NEWS THAT Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist has thyroid cancer has highlighted the important connection between presidential politics and the U.S. Supreme Court. While the court has been little more than an afterthought in a campaign dominated by terrorism, the war in Iraq and the economy, its lasting impact on important issues should reinforce for Americans on both sides of the ideological divide what's at stake in this election. The current court has not changed in a decade, allowing for one of the most stable periods in the court's history.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau | June 22, 1993
The Supreme Court issued a series of orders yesterday with these results:CASES TO BE HEARDWorkplace bias. The court agreed to decide, at its next term starting in October, whether a company will be excused for firing a worker because of sex, race, religion or ethnic identity, if the company discovers later that there was a good reason to justify the firing. The issue arises in the case of a "campus cop" at a small college in Michigan who claimed she was fired because she was a woman. Although that firing was ruled illegal, a federal appeals court said the woman suffered no legal wrong because the company learned later that she had lied on her original job application.
NEWS
January 1, 1993
Anyone who has been involved in a divorce proceeding, or been part of a child custody hearing, or watched in frustration as a juvenile delinquent and his family get shuffled through the courts has seen firsthand that cases involving family, domestic and juvenile law get short shrift in Maryland.A blue-ribbon commission appointed by the governor has come up with a sound recommendation, but one that will require effort, thorough planning and probably more money -- a separate court to handle domestic and juvenile cases.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
The nightclub insurer promised to fight for its clients - its promotional material shows a man socked in the face with a boxing glove. But founder Jeffrey B. Cohen fights everything. He went after competitors, clients, former employees and even neighbors, filing dozens of lawsuits around the country. The Reisterstown man once sought a restraining order to keep a rival company from attending an adult industry convention. Now Cohen, 39, faces the biggest fight of his life - his company, Indemnity Insurance Corp., was seized by regulators, and federal agents said in court documents that he appears to have been plotting to attack a judge.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | July 19, 2014
Levi Watkins, the pioneering cardiac surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital, remembers the date — January 15 — because it was the anniversary of the birth of Martin Luther King Jr., and because what happened that night still makes him ache. It was 1979, and Watkins, the first black chief resident in cardiac surgery at Hopkins, had just left his office after conferring with a senior medical student named Alan Trimakas. They had agreed on the subject of a research project — cardiac neoplasms, tumors of the heart or heart valves.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2014
Before they get a decision in their immigration cases - before they even have a hearing - the tens of thousands of children entering the country illegally will face an increasingly daunting challenge at the heart of a massive backlog in U.S. immigration court: The young immigrants must first find an attorney. Legal groups and immigration experts say the number of lawyers available to represent undocumented children in Maryland and elsewhere is already woefully inadequate to meet the demand - even though many of the most recent border crossers haven't yet begun to enter the court system.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
Jenny Black, the president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, has condemned the Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision and another case striking down a Massachusetts law barring protesters from coming within 30 feet of an abortion clinic ( "In 2014, why are women still struggling to get basic health care?" July 2). Yet both rulings are small steps in the recognition and restoration of the inalienable rights of religious freedom and peaceful protest. Neither decision extends rights nor abrogates the rights of others.
NEWS
July 6, 2014
The challenge and threat to the disabled, workers and public sector unions following the Supreme Court's decision in Harris v. Quinn ( "Public unions at risk," July 1) is real. Yet again the court has taken action abridging protections afforded working people who have done so much to sustain what remains of our ever shrinking middle class. For years, labor unions have been under increasing pressure, and it is no coincidence that the decline in union membership across the private and public sectors has coincided with the greatest income inequality we've seen since the Great Depression.
NEWS
July 5, 2014
People don't have to work at Hobby Lobby, nor do people have to shop there ( "Corporations trump people in Supreme Court's Hobby Lobby decision," June 30). Get off your elite high horse and leave the people alone. Lyle Rescott, Marriottsville - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
October 2, 2006
The U.S. Supreme Court starts another new term today, with all justices in place. The newest members, Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr., who was confirmed in time to open the term last year, and Samuel A. Alito Jr., who joined in midterm, seem settled in and have lined up with conservative Justices Antonin Scalia and Clarence Thomas pretty much as expected. Justices John Paul Stevens, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, David H. Souter and Stephen G. Breyer tend to be on the other side, and Justice Anthony M. Kennedy has stepped into the swing vote role played so long by retired Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NEWS
By Jenny Black | July 2, 2014
On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a troubling ruling in favor of two corporations that argued that they should not have to provide insurance coverage for their employees' birth control because of the business owners' personal religious beliefs. Effectively, employers now have the power to deny women the new birth-control benefits of the Affordable Care Act - allowing bosses to force their personal beliefs on employees and placing women in a dire position. The Hobby Lobby decision comes just days after another blow to women's health.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 2, 2014
The Greens, the evangelical Christians who own 500 craft shops called Hobby Lobby, aren't the people on whom we should be focusing our anger this week. Neither is the Mennonite Hahn family, owners of Conestoga Wood Specialties They aren't the bad guys. The five male justices on the Supreme Court who supported the companies' refusal to provide contraceptive care to their female employees on religious grounds aren't the enemy here, either, although many might dispute that point.
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