Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCourier
IN THE NEWS

Courier

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By John Dellapina and John Dellapina,New York Daily News | August 30, 1995
NEW YORK -- Opening Night had crackled with the long-awaited and highly anticipated commencement of The Comeback.Night 2 had a similar theme -- with former champions simultaneously beginning their 1995 U.S. Open runs only yards apart on the Stadium and Grandstand Courts. But Night 2 -- with Jim Courier and Mats Wilander the featured attractions -- couldn't come close to matching the sizzle of Monica Seles' evening."I wonder if we can sell our night-session tickets," a young woman wondered aloud, while noshing at the food court.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Jonas Shaffer, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
Quarterback Danny O'Brien signed with Maryland in 2009 in part because of Ralph Friedgen. O'Brien wanted to win in college and play in the pros, and it wasn't unreasonable to believe the longtime Terps coach would be there for him, helping him, from his freshman-year snaps to his Senior Day game. Where else would they go? We know those answers now, and so their reunion Saturday doesn't seem all that bizarre. But to have Friedgen, happily unemployed and the coach of the Medal of Honor Bowl 's American team, game-planningĀ at a largely unheard-of senior showcase with O'Brien, a senior at Division II Catawba College (N.C.)
Advertisement
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | January 30, 1993
MELBOURNE, Australia -- No surprise here: No. 1 Jim Courier and No. 2 Stefan Edberg will play today in the men's final at the Australian Open."The last time we played here, he was the underdog," said Edberg, who lost in four sets to Courier in last year's final. "This year, it will be a little different. I will be the underdog. He is the No. 1 player in the world."Courier advanced by defeating Michael Stich of Germany, 7-6 (7-4), 6-4, 6-2. Stich won the battle of the service speed gun but could not match the American's relentless consistency from the baseline and regular brilliance on service returns.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
A member of an alleged international marijuana smuggling organization shipping drugs to Maryland has pleaded guilty to kidnapping a man who was later murdered in the bathroom of a White Marsh apartment. Jamaican national Dean Myrie, 39, faces life imprisonment for his role in the crime and for being a member of the organization. Myrie and other members of the ring kidnapped Michael Knight, a courier, in December, 2009, federal prosecutors said. They thought he had stolen $250,000 in money he had been holding for Brown, according to filings in the case, bound him up with a telephone cord and interrogated him. When Knight said he did not know where the money went, prosecutors say a woman named Jean Brown - who allegedly led the organization - paid two other men $100,000 to kill him. She denies the allegations.
SPORTS
March 6, 1992
INDIAN WELLS, Calif. -- Unseeded Andre Chesnokov of Russia surprised Jim Courier, the world's top-ranked player, in straight sets yesterday at the Champions Cup.Three other seeded Americans, including No. 2 seed Pete Sampras, also were bounced from the tournament in third-round matches.Courier, the event's defending champion and top seed, lost, 6-4, 7-5, to Chesnokov. Courier hurt himself with a number of errors off his forehand in the match at Hyatt Grand Champions resort. Chesnokov, ranked 36th internationally, put together a balanced, all-court game.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | July 24, 1994
Pam Shriver is bringing in two of the hottest players on the men's pro tour for her ninth annual charity tennis event.Jim Courier, ranked No. 3 in the world, and Todd Martin, No. 5, will play a best-of-three sets match in the Signet Bank Tennis Challenge at 7 p.m. Sept. 29 at the Baltimore Arena.Presented for the ninth straight year by The Baltimore Sun, the event also will feature a celebrity doubles match and a mixed doubles set starring Courier, Martin and Shriver.In announcing the event yesterday, Shriver said proceeds would be distributed by the Baltimore Community Foundation to children's charities throughout the region.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | June 24, 1994
WIMBLEDON, England -- Tennis, boring? Don't even think about it.This 1994 edition of Wimbledon is going into the record books as one to remember.A rock 'em, sock 'em upset bonanza.Only four days into this two-week marathon there already have been more major upsets in the first two rounds than ever before here.On Tuesday, women's No. 1 seed Steffi Graf became the first women's defending champion to lose in the first round.On Wednesday, Michael Stich became the first No. 2 seed in 63 years to get knocked out by a qualifier.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Staff Writer | June 30, 1993
WIMBLEDON, England -- It used to be that only John McEnroe and Jimmy Connors had trouble finding uncensored ways to express their anger.Now, even the quietest among the men's players -- Jim Courier and Pete Sampras -- are resorting to, as the polite English call it, "audible obscenities."The worst offender has been Courier, who will be on Centre Court today for his quarterfinal match with Todd Martin only because Wimbledon referee Alan Mills came to Courier's rescue during his third-round meeting Saturday against Jason Stoltenberg.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | September 28, 1994
Jim Courier wishes he hadn't said it.He had lost a tough second-round match in Indianapolis last month, and his emotions were frayed at the post-match news conference. He said he was "mentally, physically and emotionally" tired and vowed not to pick up his rackets "until my heart tells me to pick them up again. I don't know if that's going to be one day, one week, one month, one year, 10 years."Courier, who turned 24 the day before, was labeled a burnout case. He was compared to Bjorn Borg, a former No. 1 player who quit the game at 26.But Courier is not Borg.
NEWS
August 11, 1993
Howard County police have released a sketch of one of the two men sought in connection with the armed robbery of a Federal Armored Express courier Thursday morning at the Harpers Choice Village Center in the 5400 block of Harpers Farm Road.The suspect is described as a slim, black male, in his mid-20s, about 6 feet 2 inches tall, weighing 190 pounds, with short hair and a medium to dark complexion.After waiting for the courier to make a routine delivery to the Columbia Bank at 9:45 a.m. Thursday, the two robbers held him at gunpoint.
SPORTS
From staff reports | June 21, 2012
Forward Whitney Bays told the Journal and Courier of Lafayette, Ind., that she has transferred from Maryland to Purdue. She will have two years of eligibility starting in the 2013-14 season. The 2009 West Virginia Player of the Year appeared in 26 games last season with the Terps , averaging 10.1 minutes, 2.3points and 2.7 rebounds. Bays missed her senior season at Huntington High and her freshman season at Maryland because of an anterior cruciate ligament injury.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2011
A Gwynn Oak man was sentenced Wednesday to 10 years in prison for his role in a conspiracy to sell between 1 and 3 kilograms of heroin, prosecutors said. Recco F. Beaufort, 52, was the principal transporter of heroin for a drug trafficking group that processed and distributed heroin less than 1,000 feet from a charter school, according to a statement from Maryland's U.S. Attorney's Office. Beaufort delivered heroin for a New Jersey man named Charles C. "Billy" Guy, 43, to a Baltimore man named Christian Gettis, 39, the statement said.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2011
An Elkton woman indicted last year alongside a reputed drug kingpin on charges they ran a vast heroin ring was sentenced to 11 years in federal prison Monday, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Tahirah Carter, 35, was charged with drug conspiracy in August for her role as a courier for Steven Blackwell Jr., a key player, authorities say, in a violent drug feud that has led to at least four homicides and several shootouts on Baltimore streets. She pleaded guilty last fall, according to online court records, though much about her case has been kept secret.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 4, 2011
Stanislaw Edward Bask Mostwin, a highly decorated World War II Polish freedom fighter whose exploits were worthy of a Hollywood film, died Monday of arrhythmia at his Ruxton home. He was 94. Recalling his years in the underground during World War II, Mr. Mostwin described the experience for the old Sunday Sun Magazine in 1986 as "fantastic, a James Bond life for a young man. " He added, "You are defending your home. There is no hesitation, you just have to go and do it. The alternative is not to be yourself.
TRAVEL
By Eric Lomonaco and Eric Lomonaco,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2009
When most people travel, the last place they want to end up is in the hospital. For me, that's always where I'm headed. About once a month, I volunteer as a courier for the National Marrow Donor Program, transporting life-saving bone marrow or stem cells to transplant patients around the world. It's a joy to help, but it can also be exhausting. (Consider how much faster you would run to make a connecting flight if you were carrying much-needed blood instead of souvenirs.) My fiancee once joked that I wasn't happy if I wasn't on a train or plane once a week.
NEWS
March 21, 2008
David Travis Drehoff, a former FedEx courier and lacrosse player, died of liver failure at Baltimore Washington Medical Center March 10. The Pasadena resident was 41. Born in Baltimore and raised in Linthicum Heights, he was a 1985 graduate of Andover High School, where he played lacrosse and was named by sportswriters to an All-America team. He enrolled at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and studied for years as a general business major. He was captain of the UMBC lacrosse team in the late 1980s.
SPORTS
By Sandra Harwitt and Sandra Harwitt,New York Times News Service | January 27, 1992
MELBOURNE, Australia -- It was Australia Day, a celebration of the nation's birth, but it was an all-American celebration at the Australian Open after Jim Courier won the year's first Grand Slam tournament and stood poised to become the first U.S. man since John McEnroe in 1985 to be ranked No. 1 in the world.Courier, currently ranked second, scored a decisive 6-3, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 victory over Stefan Edberg to leave him trailing the world's No. 1 player by only 20 points on the Association of Tennis Professionals computer.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | December 9, 1997
A courier for Homestead Publishing Co. died yesterday when his station wagon was hit head-on while he was making deliveries near Aberdeen, state police said.Charles J. Bowman, 66, of Upper Falls was traveling west on Route 156-Aldino Road shortly after 11 a.m. when a car crossed the center line and struck his car, state police said. The driver of the other car, Tracey L. Smith, 25, of Aberdeen, was not injured, police said.Bowman worked part time for the past four years for Homestead, which publishes the Aegis and is owned by Times Mirror Co., publishers of The Sun. "He was very gregarious, joked around, and people liked him a lot," said John F. Patinella, president of Homestead.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin | September 28, 2007
Baltimore County police arrested one man and were seeking at least one other after a courier for Dunbar Armored Inc. was assaulted and robbed as she carried a large sum of money to a bank in Overlea, police said. About 10 a.m. Wednesday, the armed 31-year-old officer was approaching the front door of Wachovia Bank in the 6800 block of Belair Road, carrying at least one deposit bag containing an undisclosed amount of cash, when she was struck in the face by an apparently unarmed man who grabbed the bag and fled toward a getaway car, said Cpl. Walter Pepper of the county police robbery squad.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.