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By Chicago Tribune | July 31, 1991
Women who want to be, not one but two steps, ahead of the fashion crowd may want to turn their attention to pants and, even more specifically, to pantsuits. "It's the quiet trend, the sleeper of the season," says Kal Ruttenstein, senior vice president of fashion direction for Bloomingdale's, of the return of both a look and a word that haven't been terribly au courant for years.Pants have not been in absentia, of course, but in recent seasons they've relinquished the fashion spotlight to short skirts, leggings and pants so narrow they almost resemble tights.
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SPORTS
November 5, 2013
In anticipation for Friday's Maryland-Connecticut season opener at the Barclays Center, we traded emails with Dom Amore, who covers UConn men's basketball for the Hartford Courant. (For more of Dom's coverage, check out his blog over at the Courant's website .) TRACKING THE TERPS: This UConn team seems to be pretty balanced. Heading into the season what do you think will be the Huskies' greatest strength and biggest question mark? DOM AMORE: Obviously UConn's strength is the backcourt, not only in terms of quality but in terms of experience.
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NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1997
Michael E. Waller, publisher of the Hartford Courant in Connecticut, will become publisher and chief executive officer of The Sun next month, the newspapers said yesterday, replacing Mary Junck, who was promoted to president of Times Mirror Co.'s eastern newspapers.Waller, 56, becomes The Baltimore Sun Co.'s fourth publisher in 10 years in one of several management changes announced yesterday for Times Mirror, The Sun's parent company.Junck, 50, will remain in Baltimore with significantly expanded responsibilities: She will take charge not only of Times Mirror's six East Coast newspapers but also of the company's consumer magazines, including Field & Stream, Popular Science and The Sporting News.
SPORTS
September 13, 2012
UConn-Maryland chat - 09/13
NEWS
By Jack Dolan and Andrew Julien and Jack Dolan and Andrew Julien,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2003
A handful of medical schools in the United States and abroad graduate troubled doctors at about 10 times the rate of the best schools, an eight-month Hartford Courant investigation found. Four medical schools - the Autonomous University of Guadalajara in Mexico, Howard University in Washington, Manila Central University in the Philippines and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn. - ranked at the bottom in analyses of three databases containing records of disciplinary actions against thousands of physicians across the United States.
NEWS
By MATTHEW KAUFFMAN AND LISA CHEDEKEL and MATTHEW KAUFFMAN AND LISA CHEDEKEL,THE HARTFORD COURANT | May 15, 2006
In the 17 months after their son, Eddie, announced he was heading off to fight the war on terror, Margaret and Edward Brabazon of Bensalem, Pa., had held their breath. They were accustomed to holding their breath with the boy they had taken in as a foster child at age 3 and adopted at 12 - the boy who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and attention-deficit disorder by the time he was 10, and who had spent his early teenage years in a psychiatric hospital and group homes for the emotionally disturbed.
NEWS
By Dave Altimari and Jack Dolan and Dave Altimari and Jack Dolan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 13, 2002
The FBI is investigating whether the anthrax used in last fall's attacks could have been grown secretly inside an Army lab and taken elsewhere to be converted into a weapon, according to three sources familiar with the investigation. A former government microbiologist, who was interviewed in recent days by the FBI, said agents focused their questioning on the logistics of how someone with access to the U.S. Army's biodefense labs at Fort Detrick, in Frederick County, might carry out the scheme.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | May 17, 1992
Readers seeing the exact same stories in The Sun and then The Evening Sun have been asking for months, "Why don't you just kill The Evening Sun? You're slowly letting it die anyway."The answer: About 133,800 people buy the paper. This is 25,000 fewer than during the same period ending March 30 last year, but too many readers to ignore or to transfer easily to The Sun all at once. When papers fold, many readers just vanish.How did The Baltimore Sun get to this point? In the last two years, advertising and circulation revenues declined.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 23, 2000
On Sept. 17, 1852, The Sun -- that Baltimore newspaper founded 15 years before -- ran an ad offering a $100 reward for "A Negro Boy named George Stewart, a slave for life." Stewart was an escaped slave. The Sun and many papers of the antebellum era frequently ran and made money from such ads. In July 2000, Sun Editor William K. Marimow received a call from Paul Zielbauer, a reporter from The New York Times, "about (The Sun's) 19th-century practices." The call was inspired by The Hartford Courant, a Connecticut newspaper that is part of the same Tribune chain that owns The Sun. It seems The Courant had offered one of the orgy of apologies that had started with Aetna Inc., a Connecticut insurance company that had issued policies on slaves.
SPORTS
By Matt Eagan and Matt Eagan,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 27, 2003
NEW YORK - Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun said the rule allowing schools to play exhibition games against Amateur Athletic Union teams and other organizations that fall under the umbrella of USA Basketball should be examined and possibly changed. "I've always felt that this rule is one that should be looked at, and I think the NCAA will look at it, too," Calhoun said. UConn has come under scrutiny for its exhibition game against a team affiliated with the Cecil-Kirk AAU program in Baltimore, though the game was within NCAA rules.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | June 17, 2007
LE PETIT COCHON 1030 S. Charles St., Federal Hill / 410-528-6001 / Open Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. If you're looking for that perfect gift with a distinctive European flair, there's no need to hop on a plane. Instead, head to Federal Hill's latest au courant gift shop, the lovely and lively Le Petit Cochon. "I love pigs and wanted something with whimsy," says owner Liz Perkins about the name, which means "the little pig" in French. But don't expect to find a store full of merchandise peppered with pigs (although there was an adorable pink pig pillbox)
NEWS
By MATTHEW KAUFFMAN AND LISA CHEDEKEL and MATTHEW KAUFFMAN AND LISA CHEDEKEL,THE HARTFORD COURANT | May 15, 2006
In the 17 months after their son, Eddie, announced he was heading off to fight the war on terror, Margaret and Edward Brabazon of Bensalem, Pa., had held their breath. They were accustomed to holding their breath with the boy they had taken in as a foster child at age 3 and adopted at 12 - the boy who had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and attention-deficit disorder by the time he was 10, and who had spent his early teenage years in a psychiatric hospital and group homes for the emotionally disturbed.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 5, 2005
Tim Zagat, co-founder and CEO of the influential Zagat restaurant guide, says when he eats with a tie on he feels like a foie gras goose being force-fed. It's a little extreme, but you get his point. Like many of us, he loves good French food, but he'd just as soon do without the formality that traditionally surrounds haute cuisine palaces. He would be happy at Baltimore's new Brasserie Tatin, which opened last week near the Johns Hopkins University, or Petit Louis or Timothy Dean or Limoges, to name four of the city's informal French restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,THE HARTFORD COURANT | March 7, 2004
It appears that some Communist revolutionaries never really die - they just keep inspiring new generations of beret-wearing acolytes. Che Guevara, the Argentine-born guerrilla leader who became a hero to the New Left radicals of the 1960s, has been dead since 1967. But the spirit of the revolutionary theorist is very much alive. Oh, sure, there have been minor Che moments recently (Elizabeth Hurley was photographed in London wearing a Che T-shirt; rapper Jay-Z sports similar Che-wear on the cover of his MTV Unplugged recording; humorist Margaret Cho uses an iconic Cho-as-Che illustration to promote her latest "Revolution Tour")
SPORTS
By Matt Eagan and Matt Eagan,THE HARTFORD COURANT | November 27, 2003
NEW YORK - Connecticut coach Jim Calhoun said the rule allowing schools to play exhibition games against Amateur Athletic Union teams and other organizations that fall under the umbrella of USA Basketball should be examined and possibly changed. "I've always felt that this rule is one that should be looked at, and I think the NCAA will look at it, too," Calhoun said. UConn has come under scrutiny for its exhibition game against a team affiliated with the Cecil-Kirk AAU program in Baltimore, though the game was within NCAA rules.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Hochman and Steve Hochman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
The notion of Michelle Branch and Avril Lavigne as the anti-Britneys has been so overplayed that you'd think they were Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. That's not fair - they point in more substantial directions than Spears et al., but their debut albums were, in truth, just different shades of professionally polished, fashion-conscious teen pop. It also would be unfair to expect a breakthrough simply because Branch is heading out of teenhood. Still, it would have been nice if she'd, uh, branched out more on this second album.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | June 17, 2007
LE PETIT COCHON 1030 S. Charles St., Federal Hill / 410-528-6001 / Open Tuesday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m. If you're looking for that perfect gift with a distinctive European flair, there's no need to hop on a plane. Instead, head to Federal Hill's latest au courant gift shop, the lovely and lively Le Petit Cochon. "I love pigs and wanted something with whimsy," says owner Liz Perkins about the name, which means "the little pig" in French. But don't expect to find a store full of merchandise peppered with pigs (although there was an adorable pink pig pillbox)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve Hochman and Steve Hochman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 10, 2003
The notion of Michelle Branch and Avril Lavigne as the anti-Britneys has been so overplayed that you'd think they were Joni Mitchell and Patti Smith. That's not fair - they point in more substantial directions than Spears et al., but their debut albums were, in truth, just different shades of professionally polished, fashion-conscious teen pop. It also would be unfair to expect a breakthrough simply because Branch is heading out of teenhood. Still, it would have been nice if she'd, uh, branched out more on this second album.
NEWS
By Jack Dolan and Andrew Julien and Jack Dolan and Andrew Julien,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2003
A handful of medical schools in the United States and abroad graduate troubled doctors at about 10 times the rate of the best schools, an eight-month Hartford Courant investigation found. Four medical schools - the Autonomous University of Guadalajara in Mexico, Howard University in Washington, Manila Central University in the Philippines and Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tenn. - ranked at the bottom in analyses of three databases containing records of disciplinary actions against thousands of physicians across the United States.
NEWS
By Eric Rich and Elizabeth Hamilton and Eric Rich and Elizabeth Hamilton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 29, 2002
BRIDGEPORT, R.I. - The Rev. Laurence F.X. Brett vanished abruptly almost a decade ago, leaving clothes still hanging in the closet of his Baltimore home and a trail of accusers stretching across four states and back 30 years. Now, a Hartford Courant investigation has found the disgraced priest - whose disappearance took him beyond the reach of police and plaintiffs' attorneys investigating accusations that Brett sexually abused teen-age boys. He has been living a secretive but comfortable life on the tropical island of St. Maarten in the Caribbean.
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