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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1994
MOSCOW -- The lower house of parliament set the stage yesterday for a major showdown with President Boris N. Yeltsin by declaring an amnesty for the organizers of the failed 1991 coup as well as the ringleaders of the armed uprising of last October.The amnesty vote was virtually the first important piece of business for Russia's new legislature, and it promises to resurrect the inter-branch power struggle that Mr. Yeltsin had hoped was now behind him.The president's aides reacted furiously to the vote in the Duma, or lower house.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | August 16, 1992
MOSCOW -- The coup that unfolded one year ago this week -- and then unraveled -- came about in the first place because of Boris N. Yeltsin.The plotters moved against Mikhail S. Gorbachev, but they missed their aim, even from the start: It was Mr. Yeltsin they hated.He was a reformed Communist, and, like a reformed sinner at a revival meeting, he had seen the light and was altogether filled with zeal about the misdeeds of his former comrades.Mr. Yeltsin -- today so often pictured as the beleaguered president of a sorely pressed nation -- was in the summer of 1991 the very image of undaunted leadership.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Soviet ambassador to Washington, Viktor Komplektov, yesterday defended his hand-delivery of -Z messages from the Moscow coup leaders to the White House and State Department earlier this week and declared his loyalty to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.Mr. Komplektov also said he did not become suspicious of the coup until Monday night when its leaders failed to produce promised evidence that Mr. Gorbachev was too ill to carry out his presidential functions.Mr. Komplektov, said the embassy staff decided Monday it would not "deviate from the major policy course" set by the Gorbachev administration.
NEWS
By Esther B. Fein and Esther B. Fein,New York Times News Service GtB | October 4, 1991
First came the coup of the Kremlin; now comes the coup between hard covers: President Mikhail S. Gorbachev has sold his account of the August uprising for a reported $500,000 to HarperCollins.Giving new heft and meaning to the ever-growing field of quickie books, HarperCollins says it plans to translate the 74-page typed manuscript, print it, bind it and ship it to stores before the end of this month.In a nation where Nikita S. Khrushchev, after his own overthrow, was forced to write his memoirs in secret and smuggle them out of the country, many Kremlin denizens are now tell-all graphomaniacs.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | August 23, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Soviet ambassador to Washington Viktor Komplektov yesterday defended his hand-delivery of messages from the Moscow coup leaders to the White House and State Department earlier this week, and declared his loyalty to President Mikhail S. Gorbachev.Mr. Komplektov also said he did not become suspicious of the coup until Monday night when its leaders failed to produce promised evidence that Mr. Gorbachev was too ill to carry out his presidential functions.Mr. Komplektov revealed that Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A. Bessmertnykh, who told a Moscow press conference that he was too ill to work during the coup or to speak out against it, sent a directive from the Foreign Ministry to major Soviet embassies Monday, saying Kremlin foreign policy would not change.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | August 23, 1991
Does it occur to anyone besides me that the coup in the Soviet Union made no sense from the very beginning?That it was the Coup That Couldn't Shoot Straight? The Koup Klutz Plan?All the analysts are saying the same thing: Why didn't the coup leaders grab Boris Yeltsin when they grabbed Mikhail Gorbachev?Surely they knew that Yeltsin was a firebrand, a passionately committed democrat and, as president of the Russian Republic, that he commanded considerable resources.But no, they leave him in place to organize a resistance movement.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service n | September 1, 1991
While large numbers of Americans have expressed interest in visiting the Soviet Union since the failure of the Aug. 19 coup, tour operators say the volume of visitors is not likely to match that in Berlin in 1989 following the collapse of the Berlin Wall.According to representatives of 10 companies offering tours to the Soviet Union, a string of cancellations because of the coup was followed quickly by a small flurry of inquiries and bookings when it became clear the coup had collapsed.The State Department, which warned against travel to the Soviet Union Aug. 19, downgraded its advisory to a caution the day after the coup failed.
NEWS
By Alison Mitchell and Alison Mitchell,Newsday | October 26, 1991
MOSCOW -- Former KGB chief Vladimir Kryuchkov began planning the coup against Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev as early as late December, but he overestimated the passivity of the Soviet people and assumed they would be easily intimidated by tanks, a senior KGB official said yesterday.Maj. Gen. Anatoly Oleinikov, a KGB officer for 24 years, said a KGB internal investigation showed that six more senior KGB officials had been involved in the coup and could be arrested soon. Fourteen people have already been charged with treason, among them Mr. Kryuchkov and four other officers of the KGB secret service.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | March 23, 1994
MOSCOW -- Rumors about an impending coup have been crackling across the country like an electrical storm, causing such intense static that yesterday a famous psychic felt compelled to send out some special brain waves.Vladimir Trufanov, psychic and healer, had no easy task. The center of the rumors, President Boris N. Yeltsin, was vacationing on the Black Sea, separated from the psychic by 1,100 miles and a very negative force field.Mr. Trufanov thought hard and soon reported that he had "remotely checked the body of Boris Nikolayevich and found out that there are no grounds for concern."
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,Los Angeles Times | September 21, 2006
BANGKOK, Thailand -- In the end, the military coup that ousted Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra was fitting for this largely Buddhist nation. Not a shot was fired. As government overthrows go, this one was about as nonviolent as a country can get. Yesterday, women offered roses to many of the hundreds of young soldiers who patrolled the streets in their green khaki uniforms. Outside Government House, the official residence of the deposed Thaksin, curious onlookers gathered at the gates to take pictures with cell phones and digital cameras.
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