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NEWS
July 8, 2013
The Sun editorial staff's response to the military coup against Egypt's democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi is to urge the generals return to country's back to civilian control quickly ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4). Apparently, it is OK with The Sun that a minority of the population gets a second chance to elect the person they feel will be better for the country through mob tactics. Elections have consequences, and Americans have been reminded of that fact over the past six years of the Obama administration.
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NEWS
March 7, 2014
Letter writer Andrij Chornodolsky demands that the West confront Russia over the crisis in Crimea ( "Stand up to Putin," March 4). But while long on eloquent phraseology, he's short on facts - the same facts that mainstream media coverage of the Ukrainian situation has consistently ignored. First, the insurgents are not fighting for "democracy and justice," as Mr. Chornodolsky claims. Their demonstrations and rallies, up to and including the coup of Feb. 22, have been led by out-and-out, swastika-wearing Nazis, holdovers from the infamous Stefan Bandera apparatus that openly allied with Hitler during his 1941 invasion of the Soviet Union and murdered nearly 100,000 Poles and Jews in Ukraine during the occupation.
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NEWS
January 8, 1991
The presidency of Jean-Bertrand Aristide in Haiti is strengthened by the failure of the thuggish leader of the Tontons Macoute militia to prevent it. Roger Lafontant, enforcer of the former Duvalier dictatorship, had vowed not to let the leftist priest, overwhelmingly elected last month, assume office. Dr. Lafontant gave it his best shot, seizing the palace, holding interim president Ertha Pascal-Trouillot hostage and proclaiming himself provisional president. The outraged people of Port-au-Prince took to the streets and loyal soldiers quickly smashed the coup and seized the criminal.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
The Sun editorial staff's response to the military coup against Egypt's democratically elected President Mohamed Morsi is to urge the generals return to country's back to civilian control quickly ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4). Apparently, it is OK with The Sun that a minority of the population gets a second chance to elect the person they feel will be better for the country through mob tactics. Elections have consequences, and Americans have been reminded of that fact over the past six years of the Obama administration.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I have just one question for the writer of the editorial about Egypt's military coup ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4): Why is it any of our business what the generals or the public in Egypt do next? Holding generals to promises there is what gets us hated around the world for interfering in other countries' affairs. That's the purpose of the UN, not the U.S.A. F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Letter writer Andrij Chornodolsky demands that the West confront Russia over the crisis in Crimea ( "Stand up to Putin," March 4). But while long on eloquent phraseology, he's short on facts - the same facts that mainstream media coverage of the Ukrainian situation has consistently ignored. First, the insurgents are not fighting for "democracy and justice," as Mr. Chornodolsky claims. Their demonstrations and rallies, up to and including the coup of Feb. 22, have been led by out-and-out, swastika-wearing Nazis, holdovers from the infamous Stefan Bandera apparatus that openly allied with Hitler during his 1941 invasion of the Soviet Union and murdered nearly 100,000 Poles and Jews in Ukraine during the occupation.
FEATURES
By Garry Abrams and Garry Abrams,Los Angeles Times | August 23, 1991
BEFORE HE WAS kicked out of office -- at least momentarily -- by this week's bizarre and ineffective coup, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev had been placed in political peril uncounted times by die-hard novelists desperately milking the Cold War for one more conspiracy.In a host of recent thrillers, American writers had threatened the Soviet leader with assassination, kidnapping and elaborate coup plots, usually spawned by true-believing Communists intent on making the Motherland once more safe for Marxism.
NEWS
By Newsday | August 21, 1991
IF THE hard-liners who engineered the coup d'etat against Mikhail Gorbachev Monday believe that a return to the old way of doing things will solve the problems facing the Soviet Union, they are tragically mistaken. Central control, martial law and dictatorship will only lead to further economic decline, greater chaos and even civil war. This isn't the end of the second Soviet revolution, just the beginning of another, possibly more dangerous, phase.President Bush was correct to react with caution, but to make it clear all aid to the Soviet Union is going to be withheld pending developments.
NEWS
By Melor Sturua | August 23, 1991
MIKHAIL Gorbachev has returned to Moscow, reinstated as president of the Soviet Union. A lot of people -- including the leaders of the West -- are happy it turned out this way. Gorbomania may even rise again.But in every way that matters, Gorbachev is a loser, not the winner. In the long run, I suspect that he will become a one-term president or, to be more optimistic, he will be re-elected as a ceremonial figurehead, the Soviet version of the queen of England.The real power will belong to the republics, especially to new Russia, to Boris Yeltsin, which is why Yeltsin is not the least interested in climbing to what some people might mistakenly call a "higher office."
NEWS
February 27, 1991
The generals have taken over Thailand again. They had better take care not to kill the goose that laid the golden egg. Thailand is rapidly becoming the fifth tiger of Asian development, a Third World country nearly as big and populous as France that is graduating into the economic class of a Taiwan or South Korea. Things like overthrowing the first elected prime minister since 1976 may scare the stockholders, who are not all Japanese. The generals are stockholders, too.Thailand is a constitutional monarchy where the army decides ignore the serious environmental harm being done, especially to whether and when civilians may rule up to a point.
NEWS
July 8, 2013
I have just one question for the writer of the editorial about Egypt's military coup ("Egypt's revolution, Part II," July 4): Why is it any of our business what the generals or the public in Egypt do next? Holding generals to promises there is what gets us hated around the world for interfering in other countries' affairs. That's the purpose of the UN, not the U.S.A. F. Cordell, Lutherville
NEWS
By Sheilah Kast | August 18, 2011
Twenty years ago, tens of thousands of Russians took to the streets of Moscow, just as Egyptians, Tunisians and Syrians have this year — rejecting the old order, demanding freedom and democracy. That August, the Russian democrats prevailed because their will was greater than that of those who plotted the coup against Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. The dynamics of the Arab Spring are strikingly similar. I was there that day, as the ABC News correspondent in our Moscow bureau.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
Have you seen the scoot coupes out and about in Ocean City? If you're at all like me, when you see one you smile and think "how cute and fun!" And your very next thought after that is "too dangerous for me, though. " Scoot coupes are those tiny two-person vehicles that resemble mini-cars, have three wheels and somehow seem a bit, well, flimsy for any road, let alone one as busy as Coastal Highway. But the scoot coupes are legal in Ocean City (Delaware, too) and have been since last summer.  And as of this season the "motorized passenger scooters" are also legal on most state roads.
SPORTS
By Phil Rogers | October 19, 2010
NEW YORK — In any business, you have good days and bad days. Seldom, however, do days come along like the ones that Jon Daniels, Brian Cashman and their co-workers did back in July, when they battled over left-handed pitcher Cliff Lee and possibly a trip to the World Series. There was nothing surprising about what Lee did on Monday night at Yankee Stadium. It's what he does when the money is on the line, and he does it over and over again. But the fact that he threw this two-hit, 13-strikeout masterpiece in a gray, road uniform of the Texas Rangers, rather than the classic Yankees pinstripes, remains one of the most shocking chapters in modern baseball history.
NEWS
December 24, 2008
LANSANA CONTE President of Guinea Guinea President Lansana Conte, who had ruled the African nation with an iron hand since seizing power in a coup nearly a quarter-century ago, died after a lengthy illness, the president of the National Assembly said yesterday. Aboubacar Sompare, flanked by the country's prime minister and the head of the army, said on state-run television that Mr. Conte died Monday evening. He was believed to be in his 70s, but the government has not disclosed his birth date.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 7, 2008
BEIRUT, Lebanon - The elected president of Mauritania was ousted yesterday in a bloodless military coup that appeared to spell the end for the Arab nation's experiment in democracy. A council led by a military commander ousted President Sidi Ould Cheikh Abdallahi and placed him and other government officials in the North African country under house arrest. There were no reports of gunfire or violence. But Arab news channels showed scenes of black-clad riot police firing tear gas and chasing after civilians in the streets of Nouakchott, the capital.
NEWS
February 5, 1992
Venezuela had a close call. The mutiny against democratic government failed. The army put it down. The battle was within the military, between units. President Carlos Andres Perez has a good chance to finish out his term next year and hand over to a democratically elected successor, no doubt an opponent, as he did in 1979. But the well organized coup attempt suggests that this is less than a sure thing. Combined with the so-far successful coup in Haiti, the Venezuelan mutiny suggests that self-congratulations on Latin America's inexorable shift to democracy are premature.
NEWS
December 27, 1992
When it comes to hard-nosed politics, don't count on the gang from Montgomery County to bring home victory. They're not very good at the game. They tend to be responsible, well-informed legislators, but poor politicos. That helps explain the collapse of Del. Nancy Kopp's once-promising coup attempt in the House of Delegates.Mrs. Kopp, who has represented Bethesda in Annapolis for 18 years, is speaker pro tem. But when the legislature convenes Jan. 13, she'll lose that post for trying to topple Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell in a mid-term insurgency campaign.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN REPORTER | July 1, 2008
Pete Medd and Jim Cherneski aren't operating under any illusions. The co-head coaches of Crystal Palace FC USA know that a win tonight over the New York Red Bulls of Major League Soccer wouldn't exactly be on par with Rocky beating Apollo Creed, the U.S. hockey team beating the Russians in the 1980 Olympics or a 16th seed beating a top seed in the NCAA men's basketball tournament. But if Crystal Palace should happen to knock off the Red Bulls in the U.S. Open Cup third-round match at Broadneck at 7:30 p.m., well, it would be rather sizable, if not seismic.
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