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NEWS
January 5, 2012
"Only employees whose positions can be eliminated without cutting county services will be approved," according to the Sun's recent coverage of Baltimore County employee buyouts ("More than 650 apply for Balto. Co. early retirement," Jan. 4). Seems to me if you think this over, why are these people in these positions now if they can be eliminated without noticing a lack of service? Tim Hugus
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NEWS
January 28, 2014
When I first spotted the article on pay raises for the Baltimore County executive and County Council members, I thought there was no way citizens would allow that to happen ( "Balto. Co. Council approves raises for council, executive," Jan. 22). Well, I was wrong. I am beside myself over their voting themselves huge raises when we taxpayers are footing the bill. Why do they deserve a 14 percent to 16 percent increase when they are only giving county workers a 2 percent or 3 percent cost-of-living increase in 2015?
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | March 10, 1993
Members of the union that represents the county's secretarial and clerical employees will begin wearing red, white and blue ribbons this week to protest expected layoffs and show their solidarity.Many of the 385 members of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, Local 2563, feel they are targeted for staff cuts in the coming government reorganization. The result is sagging morale, said Lee Lyons, Local 2563 president."It's ugly," Ms. Lyons said of the mood of her members.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council voted Monday to scale back retiree health benefits for current and future county government employees, a move officials said was needed to keep the county from facing a fiscal crisis. After months of discussion among council members, County Executive Laura Neuman and union officials, the bill was approved with only brief discussion on a 5-2 vote. The bill's sponsor, Councilman Jamie Benoit, a Crownsville Democrat, said the measure "has probably involved more work than any I've worked on. " Neuman brought the issue to the forefront in September, saying the county would be "on a path to bankruptcy" if it didn't change the retiree benefits package.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | May 4, 2008
They came to the County Council's annual budget hearing directly from their jobs, in work clothes or sporting chartreuse T-shirts printed with "Raise our pay up from the bottom." From the packed auditorium at North Harford High School, county workers waved posters with the same message and applauded loudly for speakers who took up their cause. County Executive David R. Craig has proposed an operating budget of $616,008,031 and a capital budget of $279,813,330 for fiscal year 2009, which begins July 1. The total is about $34 million less than the 2008 fiscal year and one of the leanest budgets in the past decade.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | April 9, 1993
Baltimore County employees weren't expecting any cost-of-living pay raises again this summer -- and they were right.County executive Roger B. Hayden confirmed yesterday that there will be no general pay increase in the budget he is to present next week to the county council for the third year in a row."There won't be a COLA [cost-of-living adjustment] this year," Mr. Hayden said yesterday.He had hinted as much last week, when he said that county teachers will not get a $1,400 across-the-board increase approved by the school board.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
Morris W. Barrett 3rd's round, jovial face and snow-white Santa Claus beard have been a fixture around Baltimore County government for 15 years, but no more.County white-collar workers recently voted to drop the union that represented them and which Mr. Barrett led. Now, the 32-year county employee is returning to Cockeysville to resume his life as a public works inspector.Since county workers achieved collective bargaining rights in 1977, Mr. Barrett has virtually personified the Baltimore County Classified Employees Association (BCCEA)
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
An article Wednesday incorrectly reported the name of the labor group pursuing a lawsuit on behalf of 112 Baltimore County employees laid off in February 1993 by County Executive Roger B. Hayden. The Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees now represents the employees.The Sun regrets the error.The twisting legal trail that Baltimore County's laid-off workers are following in trying to regain their jobs got even more convoluted yesterday in county Circuit Court.Judge John F. Fader II, who has been considering two parallel suits filed by two groups of former workers since mid-July, said he will:* Send the cases of 13 workers back for a rehearing before the Personnel and Salary Advisory Board.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
When Anne Arundel County Police Chief P. Thomas Shanahan predicted that county workers would pledge $150,000 in United Way donations this year, coordinators for the charity stared at him in disbelief. "I told them I knew it was awfully ambitious, but that I also know what kind of workers this county has," Shanahan said. County employees not only met the goal, but exceeded it, pledging $186,000, an increase of 38 percent over last year's donations. Not even Shanahan, director of the 2002 United Way fund-raising drive for county government, had expected that much from county employees.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1998
Angry Baltimore County employees vowed yesterday to wage an aggressive campaign against the Ruppersberger administration's proposal to strip 75 top jobs out of the county's merit system, saying the move is only the latest assault on the system's integrity.Workers say County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger already has sidestepped the county's laws by replacing merit system workers -- ranging from public works bureau chiefs to code enforcement inspectors -- with so-called part-time appointees.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2013
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is drawing criticism for refusing to repay hundreds of police retirees who a judge found were overcharged for their health insurance. Last month, a county circuit judge gave the county 20 days to pay about $573,000 to more than 400 retired Police Department employees. The county has not done so and plans to continue to fight the order, officials said Friday. Councilwoman Vicki Almond says the county is acting as if it is "above the law. " "It's unfair to our constituents," said Almond, a Reisterstown Democrat.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman is closing most government offices on both Thursday and Friday for Independence Day. Friday will be an "administrative leave day" for non-essential employees. County agencies that have round-the-clock operations will operate as usual on Thursday and Friday. Employees in those agencies who must work on Friday will be able to take another administrative leave day, Neuman said. In a statement, Neuman said that county workers had to take two dozen furlough days over the last two years.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Baltimore County said Thursday it has settled three disability lawsuits filed by former firefighters and a police officer who alleged they were illegally forced out of their jobs. County Attorney Mike Field said the agreements would allow the firefighters to return to work with light-duty assignments. The police officer will receive modified retirement benefits. They will get $20,000 each in damages, as well as a total of more than $47,000 in attorney's fees, Field said. "These settlements honor these employees for their past service while also ensuring that firefighters and police officers who serve the residents of Baltimore County are working in jobs that match their physical abilities for the safety of all," Field wrote in a statement posted to the county's blog.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
In Baltimore County, like much of Maryland, tax revenues have flat-lined. State aid for such things as road resurfacing is not much better. County workers won't be receiving cost-of-living increases for the fifth year in a row. Yet amid all this austerity, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz last week proposed a budget that finances new schools and retrofits many others with air conditioning. There are millions of dollars for new school security systems, for a new family resource center on the east side of the county and for new technology for police.
NEWS
March 5, 2013
Act first and ask questions later is not always a great management strategy, but in the case of Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman's response to a mysterious network of surveillance cameras in and around government buildings, it's hard to consider it rash. Ms. Neuman has now been on the job for a little over a week, after being named by the County Council to replace former executive John Leopold, and given the circumstances of his departure, Ms. Neuman can't act fast enough to convince county workers and residents that a new leader has taken charge at the Arundel Center.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2012
Anne Arundel County councilmen approved on Monday the first raise for county workers in more than four years. The council unanimously granted a 3 percent pay increase for more than 550 officers who belong to the Fraternal Order of Police, as well as for an additional 1,000 employees in another union whose contract included a "me, too" clause entitling its members to raises if another bargaining unit received them. The county was forced to give the $1.6 million worth of raises, retroactive to July 1, after the Court of Appeals ruled in favor of the police union in a labor dispute.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Norris P. West and Larry Carson and Norris P. West,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1990
The nervous smiles, the darting eyes, the too quick laughter -- such are the telltale signs these anxious days in the halls of Baltimore and Howard county governments."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1998
Baltimore County workers urged the County Council last night to reject a proposed charter amendment that would allow up to 75 top jobs to be removed from the merit system and become political appointments.Ronald E. Harvey, president of the Supervisory Management and Confidential Association, a group of 700 of county government's top bureaucrats, warned the council that "we can amply show that a spoils system already exists."Harvey, who works in personnel, accused the administration of County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger of manipulating the merit system so completely that civil service rules are routinely bypassed.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 28, 2012
When Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold returned his automatic pay raise in solidarity with county workers, he also entitled himself to an income tax deduction. Leopold says he declined it. Because the returns technically amount to a donation to Anne Arundel County government, they could have entitled him to a bigger refund on his taxes. But that extra money would also have meant breaking a promise not to take a raise if the government could not afford one for county workers.
NEWS
March 8, 2012
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz's political blind spot on the issue of pensions apparently knows no bounds. A man who has secured for himself and some of his closest political associates a retirement benefit far beyond what ordinary county workers would be allowed is, once again, seeking to reduce the benefits for others. First, he pushed legislation in Annapolis that would reduce benefits for county workers who had previously been employed by the state or another local government, and now he is trying to do so for a group of union laborers in the Department of Public Works and other agencies.
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