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By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 16, 2000
When you ask what Union Bridge is like, Hank Johnson has a favorite story that sums up the Carroll County town in a nutshell. "My wife mailed a letter to her sister in England and the Union Bridge post office called and said you couldn't send it for 32 cents postage. So they said they'd put the additional postage on it and send it for her," explained Johnson, a resident and a real estate agent with the Westminster office of Long and Foster Real Estate Inc. "See if that happens in Baltimore."
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Former Gov. Parris N. Glendening endorsed Anthony Brown for governor Monday, joining a parade of Democratic leaders who are backing the lieutenant governor in the June 24 primary. Glendening, who served two terms from 1995 to 2003, returned to his home political turf in Prince George's County to make the announcement at Brown's side. The former governor, known as an environmentalist, praised Brown's commitment to green causes. He expressed confidence that Brown would continue an emphasis on environmental programs dating back to the administration of Gov. Harry Hughes in the 1970s and 1980s.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
In Carroll County, the fight over growth is getting nastier by the day.Last month, construction workers for millionaire developer Martin K. P. Hill, who since 1984 has built more than 1,000 homes in Hampstead -- a town that even after the building boom has a population of only 4,000 -- were threatened with arrest as they began work on new condominiums.Hill countered with a $10 million lawsuit and got a court order allowing him to proceed.The town's reply: Last weekend, the town manager issued a "stop work" order for a 90-unit condominium project.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2012
Damascus is about to get wet. The Montgomery County town, which had banned the sale of alcoholic beverages for as long as anyone can remember, voted Tuesday to permit local restaurants to sell wine and beer. Four times in the previous 35 years, residents of the unincorporated town of just over 15,000 had voted to keep the place dry. In 1996, the ban was upheld by a few hundred votes. But this year, the vote wasn't close, as 66 percent said yes to alcohol. Retail sales of alcohol will not be permitted.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | August 29, 1992
The northeastern Maryland town of Elkton must allow the Ku Klux Klan to march there despite fears that such a demonstration could provoke violence, a federal judge ruled in Baltimore yesterday.After a brief hearing, U.S. District Judge Benson E. Legg ordered the Cecil County town to grant the Klan a march permit. He said Elkton had mustered "insufficient evidence that the threat of violence is beyond reasonable control.""Speech cannot be barred or hampered simply because the message is unpopular or offensive," the judge said, echoing a 1988 federal court ruling that allowed another Klan group to march through the Frederick County town of Thurmont.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Former Gov. Parris N. Glendening endorsed Anthony Brown for governor Monday, joining a parade of Democratic leaders who are backing the lieutenant governor in the June 24 primary. Glendening, who served two terms from 1995 to 2003, returned to his home political turf in Prince George's County to make the announcement at Brown's side. The former governor, known as an environmentalist, praised Brown's commitment to green causes. He expressed confidence that Brown would continue an emphasis on environmental programs dating back to the administration of Gov. Harry Hughes in the 1970s and 1980s.
NEWS
By Darren Allen and Carol L. Bowers and Darren Allen and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writers | September 1, 1991
Where is Todd Black?That's what administrators in three Marylandtowns are asking about Black, a Bel Air resident who operated a grant application and engineering consulting business out of an office onWest Courtland Street in Bel Air.The administrators say Black has done nothing wrong, but they areperplexed by their inability to reach him for important information he has on projects he was working on as a consultant.The projectsinclude two multi-million-dollar sewage treatment plant expansions in the Carroll County town of Manchester and Frederick County town of Brunswick.
NEWS
November 8, 1994
Nobody likes to hear someone say his house is ugly, but that is essentially what planning consultant Cyril Paumier Jr. told Taneytown about its village last month. So it is understandable that Mayor Henry I. Reindollar Jr.'s immediate reaction to the planner's evaluation was hostility. We hope that upon reflection, he and other town officials recognize the value of Mr. Paumier's assessment.Taneytown was founded in 1754 and is Carroll County's oldest municipality. The town -- named after the Taney family of Calvert County -- has evolved in a haphazard fashion over the past two-and-a-half centuries.
NEWS
By William Rasmussen and William Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2003
When Les Unglesbee moved to the Montgomery County town of Brookeville in 1951, he loved to, as he puts it, "sit out on my front porch, prop up my feet and enjoy myself." Now, with 9,000 vehicles a day rumbling within 25 feet of his house, Unglesbee, 76, stays inside. In Hampstead, Charles Walter, who has lived in the Carroll County town since 1939, says he has nearly been run over by speeding tractor-trailers while trying to cross Main Street to get his mail. "You can almost tell the time by the traffic," Walter said, referring to the town's morning and evening rush hours.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 8, 2001
P. Richard Eichman, Maryland's first small-town poet laureate who chronicled in verse the life and foibles of the Carroll County village of Union Bridge, died of cancer Thursday at Carroll County General Hospital. He was 60. Two years ago, he was designated poet laureate of Union Bridge by the Town Council. On the day of his death, his 200-page volume of verse celebrating the everyday life of the Carroll County town of 1,003 souls was shipped to England for an initial printing of 1,000 copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2012
Brett Bidle, Frederick County town councilman, tea party supporter and devout Methodist, is John Waters' new BFF. That old saying about politics making strange bedfellows? Apparently, politics has nothing on hitchhiking. Back in mid-May, Bidle, a 20-year-old college student and first-term member of the Myersville Town Council, picked up a guy on the side of the road. It was Waters, Baltimore's most unregenerate bad boy, the movie director who's given sleaze a good name. Turns out Waters (who declined to be interviewed for this article)
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
In the quaint town of New Windsor, officials have sold the municipal ball fields to a cement company, purchased a dilapidated inn with taxpayer money for development that hasn't happened and stuck residents with the bill for a nearly $5 million wastewater treatment plant. While the town council is up for election next year, angry residents aren't waiting to express their displeasure. They're pushing a measure to allow the recall of local officials. Petitioners say they aren't targeting the entire council or any one official: They want their petition campaign to send a message to all. "We are not Occupy New Windsor," said Rebecca Merson, who moved to Atlee Ridge, one of the town's new developments, in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
Picturesque little Darlington is a national historic district, home to an annual Apple Festival that attracts thousands and, come Saturday, a feasting ground for the undead. "Run for Your Lives," a 5K run, with zombies, is coming to this tiny Harford County town. Oh, the horror. "That's such a cool thing they're doing," says Heather Wheatley, a three-year resident of Darlington who sells soaps out of a newly opened apothecary shop across the river in Port Deposit. "We're gonna take these zombies just the way they are and accept them wholly.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
EDMONSTON - This little town in the paved-over heart of suburban Washington, where cows grazed long ago, is "greening" its main street - showing what Baltimore and other cities in the region might need to do to help save the Chesapeake Bay. In a bid to make the working-class community of 1,500 more pedestrian- and environmentally friendly, Edmonston has begun a $1.1 million makeover of busy Decatur Street, narrowing the two-lane residential thoroughfare...
FEATURES
By Joanna Brenner and Joanna Brenner,Special to The Sun | August 16, 2008
If you're looking to take a break from the hustle of the city or flee the sameness of suburbia, historic downtown Westminster is the perfect place to spend a day dining and shopping. The town in Carroll County began as a hub for merchants in the early 1800s, when the Baltimore-Reisterstown turnpike was created to promote trade between Baltimore and Pittsburgh. The growth continued with the creation of the Western Maryland Railroad, which was built around the time of the Civil War. And today, downtown Westminster is filled with shops featuring unique clothing and home-decor items and places for family fun. So grab your walking shoes and get ready for some good, old-fashioned fun. 1 11 A.M. HIDDEN PEARL Start the day off at a shop with something for everyone.
BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 29, 2008
Originally settled as a farming community in the 1700s and later known as Buttersburg because the town's general store operator would take local butter for payment on goods, Union Bridge didn't get its current name until 1820. This came after a bridge was built over the Pipe Creek and swampland. Because residents on both sides of the bridge pitched in to help, it became known as Union Bridge. Today the sleepy country town located just 11 miles outside Westminster in rural Carroll County offers residents an amiable retreat.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2001
GALENA -- If there's a hot topic in this rural Kent County crossroads near the Sassafras River, you can bet Horace and Josie Otwell will hear all about it. Otwell's Market, a full-service, immaculate little grocery where Horace has worked for 41 years, is the kind of place where everybody knows your family and you know theirs. Longtime customers can run a tab that's tallied by pencil, not computer, and few seem reluctant to banter about the day's events or the latest gossip as Josie works the cash register.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2005
Nearly a decade ago, the state organized a tour of a dozen abandoned buildings at Springfield Hospital Center, hoping to generate interest in restoring the property. About 50 developers participated, but none had the vision, the money or the will to create anything from the cluster of stately brick buildings. It took a small Carroll County town to accomplish that feat. After years of planning and working to find funds, Sykesville is about to launch a business and technology park in the former hospital wards known as the Warfield Complex.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Sun reporter | April 25, 2007
NEW MARKET -- Voters in this historic town east of Frederick voted yesterday to reject annexation of 262 acres of former farmland that would have increased the tiny community's population nearly fivefold. Capping a six-month debate about the future of Maryland's self-styled antiques capital, residents voted 148-105 against the annexation, which would have allowed 925 new homes to be built. About three-quarters of the town's 340 registered voters marked paper ballots in yesterday's referendum.
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