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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
County Seat Stores Inc., a youth apparel chain based in New York, will relocate its national distribution center to Baltimore County, creating about 250 jobs, company officials said yesterday.The retailer has signed a 10-year lease with UPS Properties Co. for a 276,000-square-foot building at Marshfield Business Park, a speculative warehouse and distribution project in Rosedale."It was a combination of the right building being available at the right time," said Brett Forman, County Seat's executive vice president.
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NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | January 21, 2014
State Sen. Barry Glassman's campaign for Harford County Executive has opened its headquarters at 115 N. Main St., Suite C, in Bel Air. The official grand opening of the office was Dec. 1, following the annual Bel Air Christmas Parade. "Having a campaign headquarters on Main Street in Bel Air will allow me and my dedicated campaign staff to have a base in the county seat, and will make it easier for the public to stop in and find out more about my plans for improving the county," Glassman said in a news release.
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BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1999
County Seat Stores Inc., which is in Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, is expected to close its Rosedale distribution center next month and has begun laying off its 160 workers, according to a former consultant for the company.The New York-based youth apparel chain relocated its national distribution center to Baltimore County from Minnesota in June to be closer to most of its 400 stores -- including 25 in Maryland.But the retailer has been beset with "severe liquidity problems," according to Executive Vice President Brett Forman, that landed it in Chapter 11 in January, two years after emerging from bankruptcy protection while under other management.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
Towson University student Mykeal Spivey was walking toward his off-campus apartment when three men came up from behind, demanded his cellphone and attacked him when he refused. Spivey noticed the blood as he collapsed against a light pole; he hadn't realized they had stabbed him. "I like to tell myself it was just odds. These things happen every now and then, unfortunately," said Spivey, 25. "Initially, everyone assumed that it happened downtown, not in Towson. " The attack was one of several violent incidents that have shaken the Baltimore County seat in recent months, and police and community groups have stepped up public safety campaigns in response.
NEWS
July 29, 1999
PLANNERS know that stimulating residential development is a way to revitalize declining urban centers. Witness Baltimore's recent proposal to turn the fanciful Bromo-Seltzer Tower near Camden Yards into apartments. Indeed, at many locations, city developers are responding enthusiastically to the call for residential conversions.But officials haven't had much success coaxing a similar housing revival in Towson.Towson, a so-called "edge city" by virtue of its concentrated office space and major retail, is not in decline, but county officials have long-range concerns.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Jon Meoli | January 16, 2013
Officials announced on Tuesday a trio of new restaurants and a VIP section for the 15-screen movie theater planned for the Towson Square project - an $85 million development seen as a key element in attracting more shoppers and visitors to the county seat. "We are going to make Towson a regional destination, even better than Bethesda, even better than Silver Spring," Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said at a news conference Tuesday announcing the restaurants. Such hopes have long hovered over Towson.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Mary Gail Hare and Madison Park and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporters | June 24, 2007
Aberdeen's favorite son received a hero's welcome last week -- in Bel Air. In the days leading up to Harford County's Cal Ripken Day festivities, questions arose about why the parade was held in Bel Air, the county seat, instead of Aberdeen, Ripken's hometown and the home of his minor league IronBirds. "Everyone has wondered why the event was not in Ripken's hometown," said County Councilman James V. McMahan Jr., a Republican from Bel Air who for 10 years served as curator of Aberdeen's Ripken Museum.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
To those whose impression of Towson is stuck in its days as the capital of white belts and white shoes, the idea that it could be to Baltimore what Bethesda is to Washington probably sounds hilarious. But the announcement Wednesday that developers plan a $300 million, 5-acre complex of offices, apartments, retail, restaurants and a hotel at downtown Towson's southern edge may finally push the community beyond the tipping point between its past as a sleepy county seat and the urban future that boosters have been promising for years.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | October 27, 2002
BEL AIR -- On an urban scale, Bel Air's population of about 10,400 might make it sound like a sleepy town, but don't be fooled. The county's shopping and government hub is surrounded by about 10 times as many people, many of whom moved here to enjoy the good schools and small-town feeling. People who live here say it's that charm and community pride that put Bel Air in the center of the county's hottest growth area. The profusion of people has brought with it traffic problems and school crowding, but in a town where police say the biggest crime problem is shoplifting, many residents seem willing to endure a few growing pains.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | August 29, 1995
NOTHING UNUSUAL ever happened there," Jim Pine, the lion in the winter of Baltimore County's ancient political wars, will tell you. "It was just a nice place to eat. But that's about all. Really, nothing unusual even happened there . . . "Mr. Pine was referring to the once and famous Bernie Lee's Penn Hotel, for a quarter of a century the political and social headquarters of what was, in the 1950s and 1960s, the country town of Towson, the Baltimore County...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2014
Baltimore's budget director said Tuesday he's applied for a vacant seat on the Montgomery County Council - and will resign his position here if he is named to the council. Andrew W. Kleine, 44, of Silver Spring, is among the applicants seeking to fill Councilwoman Valerie Ervin's seat, who resigned on Jan. 3 to take a job at a nonprofit. “The opportunity was totally unexpected,” Kleine said. “As a lifelong public servant and longtime community leader, I could not pass up this exciting chance to serve in a new way. If I am selected, I would resign my position with the city to focus full-time on council business.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
To those whose impression of Towson is stuck in its days as the capital of white belts and white shoes, the idea that it could be to Baltimore what Bethesda is to Washington probably sounds hilarious. But the announcement Wednesday that developers plan a $300 million, 5-acre complex of offices, apartments, retail, restaurants and a hotel at downtown Towson's southern edge may finally push the community beyond the tipping point between its past as a sleepy county seat and the urban future that boosters have been promising for years.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater | June 7, 2013
The Harford County executive heads the executive branch of the county's government. Elected every four years, the county executive leads a Cabinet composed of directors, departments and agencies, including Public Works, Treasury, Planning and Zoning, Community Services, Economic Development, and Parks and Recreation. The seven-member Harford County Council operates as the legislative branch. Six council members are elected every four years, one from each of the county's six voting districts.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | May 23, 2013
A blank wall can be a foreboding bit of architecture. Be it brick, block, concrete or wood, a building side with no windows generally has an unwelcoming aura. Possibly, that's why in many communities, an urban American tradition has grown up that results in big, blank walls being turned into forums for artistic expression. Early in this tradition, which seems to have its roots in grassroots urban renewal efforts in the 1960s and 1970s, but in those days a fair amount of the work was done clandestinely and regarded by many as graffiti.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2013
Republican Del. Wade Kach has formally announced he will challenge Baltimore County Council Todd Huff next year. “When I look at the Third District, I see a need for an experienced, tested legislator to deal with the challenges we face,” Kach, who was first elected in 1974, said this week in a statement. “I believe that by moving from the House of Delegates to the County Council, I can bring the kind of responsive public service that the citizens want and need.” Huff, a Lutherville Republican, was elected to the council in 2010.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2013
An education advocate and a longtime state lawmaker say they are eyeing Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff's seat. Democrat Laurie Taylor-Mitchell, an art historian and local education advocate, said she has decided to run for the four-year term in 2014, and Republican Del. Wade Kach said he's "seriously considering it. " Huff, a Lutherville Republican, was elected in 2010 for the district that covers the northern part of the county....
NEWS
May 31, 2012
Thanks to The Sun for highlighting the incestuous relationship between politics and business in Baltimore County ("No 'courtesy' for Wegmans," May 27). Impact on communities is the last consideration. In the county seat of Towson, developers are intent on building out the periphery. The core is littered with empty store fronts including the behemoth Towson Commons. A former state senator, F. Vernon Boozer, is among those who would push large commercial building into residential areas.
NEWS
January 22, 2006
How Bel Air was chosen On Jan. 22, 1782, an act was passed by the General Assembly enabling voters to select a new Harford County seat. From 1774, the seat of government and law had been at Bush, near what is now the junction of routes 7 and 136. Then new settlers began to occupy lands in the central and northern county, and they demanded that the county seat be more accessible to the whole population. Places to be voted on were Harford Town (Bush), Gravelly Hill, Lower Cross Roads, Otter Point and Scott's Old Fields (Bel Air)
NEWS
April 29, 2013
The proposed $60 million apartment-and-retail development proposed for the Towson Triangle is dredging up an old ambivalence about the character of the Baltimore County seat. Is it a college town? A community for families and children? A commercial downtown? A shopping and entertainment district? A home for empty-nesters? It is, and long has been, all of the above, coexisting in what is at times an uneasy balance that grows more uneasy periodically when any one segment of the community seeks to expand its presence.
NEWS
January 23, 2013
Although as a Towson resident I support redevelopment of the downtown, I hope the county will take measures so that weekend evenings at Towson Square do not resemble those outside the Towson Commons AMC ("Towson project building a buzz," Jan. 16). Large groups of noisy youths used to loiter outside the theater and play "chicken" with cars traveling along York Road long after the last movie ended. If the county executive doesn't recall what these activities were like on Fridays and Saturday nights, I am sure the police officers of Precinct 6 do. Should the former patrons of Towson Commons bring their unruly behavior to Towson Square, the county should be concerned that rather than bringing people to the county seat, some residents will choose to leave.
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