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NEWS
September 20, 2001
County school board opts against appeal of electives decision The county school board decided last night not to appeal a state Board of Education decision that requires all middle schoolers to take fine arts, health and physical education every year. Board President Carlesa Finney asked schools Superintendent Carol S. Parham to present the board with options that will meet the state's order while preserving the county's initiative to double the amount of time spent on reading each day. The county must implement the state's order by January.
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NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1996
Landmark preservation status is the latest tool being used by the Catonsville Community Conservation Association in its fight to restore the former Catonsville Middle School on Bloomsbury Avenue.The Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Commission recently voted unanimously to add the 70-year-old building to its landmarks list. The vote serves as a recommendation for preservation status to the County Council, which makes the final decision.Jim Himel, CCCA vice president, said the group hopes to safeguard the Bloomsbury building while efforts continue to convert it back to a middle school.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
Joe A. Hairston, Baltimore County's next schools superintendent, is a man in much demand. Although Hairston has agreed to take charge of Baltimore County schools starting July 1, a job for which he will be paid $180,000 a year, education officials in Georgia, where he used to work, question whether he will be able to satisfy a contract he signed with them in January. The contract confusion in Georgia could create problems for Hairston in Maryland. Members of the Baltimore County Board of Education, Hairston's new bosses, want him all to themselves.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
The fate of a proposed $23 million public school paid for by a private developer in western Anne Arundel County appears at an impasse, frustrating some Laurel-area parents eager to see the new school built. County Councilman Jamie Benoit and developer Andrew P. Zois disagree about whether it is legal for the council to review the lease agreement between Zois' Severna Park-based Polm Cos. and the Imagine Global Village Academy, which would operate the contract school. Polm has offered to build the school in exchange for zoning approval to construct a 1,000-home development called RiverWood.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
County Executive Laura Neuman said last week that she will work with the county school board and the county's delegation in Annapolis to petition state officials to fund the long-awaited Severna Park High construction project, which is scheduled to begin this year. Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget proposal for fiscal year 2015 raised eyebrows in Anne Arundel when it included $18.8 million as the state's contribution toward the county's school projects but made no provision for $25.2 million the school system had requested to begin construction of Severna Park High's replacement.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
An administrative law judge on Wednesday ruled that former Howard County school board member Allen Dyer committed "misconduct in office," and upheld the county school board's request to remove him from the panel, even though Dyer's term ended Monday. The county school board voted in June 2011 to ask the state Board of Education to remove Dyer, accusing him of breaching confidentiality requirements and bullying. The state board sent the matter to the Office of Administrative Hearings, which ultimately was to make a recommendation.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
When developers promised to build a $38 million, 700-seat elementary school in Odenton, Anne Arundel County officials embraced the proposal as a way to ease overcrowding in other area schools. They even tentatively gave the school a name: Evergreen Elementary. But plans for the school have met an obstacle. The Forks of the Patuxent, the community in which the proposed development is located, refuses to lift a covenant that the land be reserved for adult communities. Forks resident Patrick Padilla, 42, said residents who declined to lift the covenant requiring 55-and-older properties were concerned that a new housing development around the school would generate more traffic and crime without the age restriction.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | December 22, 1998
A key state committee has recommended in a preliminary round of decisions that Baltimore County receive at least $17.8 million in state school construction money, about $7 million more than state officials had recommended last week.The increase, approved last week by the state Interagency Committee on School Construction, comes as county officials grapple with aging schools and increased competition from other school systems for state construction funds.A consultant for Baltimore County schools told the county school board three months ago that repairing the county's elementary schools will cost $213 million over the next three years.
NEWS
November 1, 2001
For second time, in 4 months, jail errs, frees inmate Anne Arundel County officials said yesterday that a man who had been sentenced to serve six months for failing to pay child support was mistakenly released this week. It was the second accidental release in less than four months. Alvin Leroy Bibb, 41, of the 1600 block of Church Street in Curtis Bay was to spend his time at the Ordnance Road Detention Center in a work-release program. After he was released Monday, a warrant was issued for his arrest.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Staff Writer | February 16, 1993
The summer of '93 promises to be unusually short for Baltimore County students and teachers. Blame it on late Labor Day.This school year, classes started after Labor Day and will close June 18, at the earliest. Next school year, according to a calendar the county school board approved last week, classes will begin Aug. 30, a week before Labor Day. That means summer vacation will last just 10 weeks, compared with about 12 weeks for previous summers. It will be even shorter for teachers, who are scheduled to report Aug. 24."
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