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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | April 14, 1991
In deciding to keep Carroll's landfill dumping fees at $15 for at least another year, the County Commissioners last week brought a collective sigh of relief from eight angry mayors."
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NEWS
October 27, 2000
GOOD NEWS: Carroll County has the highest waste recycling rate in Maryland, giving the Northern Landfill an estimated 50 years more of useful life. Not good news: The county's solid waste program faces an $18 million budget deficit over the next 10 years. Dumping rates at Carroll's only public landfill will have to be raised again to cover operating and debt service costs and to open another disposal "cell" at the facility. It's a reminder that trash disposal is ever more costly, even with significant efforts at massive, efficient recycling: 90 percent of the county's solid waste is shipped off to an incinerator and recycler in Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | February 6, 1994
You could almost hear the collective sigh of relief from Howard County officials when the announcement was made from Baltimore that the Pulaski Highway incinerator there may be rebuilt as a regional center for solid waste disposal.County Executive Charles I. Ecker called the news an "answer to a prayer.""I think it would be tremendous, not only for Howard County, but for the entire region," Mr. Ecker said.In fact, the prospect of building an environmentally safe, energy-generating incinerator has always been the light at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
January 14, 1997
BROWNING-FERRIS Industries brought a partial solution to Howard County's hefty waste-disposal needs when it won approval from the county zoning board in 1994 to operate a trash transfer station in Elkridge.Howard's solid waste management plan called for such a facility, although it initially proposed that the county would operate it. In trash transfer, trucks collect waste from various locations and bring them to a central site. The waste is loaded onto larger trucks and shipped to landfills -- in this case out of state.
NEWS
October 27, 2000
GOOD NEWS: Carroll County has the highest waste recycling rate in Maryland, giving the Northern Landfill an estimated 50 years more of useful life. Not good news: The county's solid waste program faces an $18 million budget deficit over the next 10 years. Dumping rates at Carroll's only public landfill will have to be raised again to cover operating and debt service costs and to open another disposal "cell" at the facility. It's a reminder that trash disposal is ever more costly, even with significant efforts at massive, efficient recycling: 90 percent of the county's solid waste is shipped off to an incinerator and recycler in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
Democratic county executive candidate Theodore J. Sophocleus yesterday released an environmental program that would plant a million trees in four years.Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, one of the state's best-known environmental legislators, immediately endorsed the program. He had expressed concern that such issues are being overshadowed in the election."I think it's the most comprehensive game plan and blueprint that I've seen put forth for any of our counties," Mr. Winegrad said. "And it could be a blueprint for our state of Maryland."
NEWS
January 14, 1997
BROWNING-FERRIS Industries brought a partial solution to Howard County's hefty waste-disposal needs when it won approval from the county zoning board in 1994 to operate a trash transfer station in Elkridge.Howard's solid waste management plan called for such a facility, although it initially proposed that the county would operate it. In trash transfer, trucks collect waste from various locations and bring them to a central site. The waste is loaded onto larger trucks and shipped to landfills -- in this case out of state.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | May 3, 1992
The county commissioners are moving forward with a proposed $40-per-ton tipping fee, even though the cost of a revised solid waste management program, which would include mandatory recycling, is projected to be higher.During a work session Wednesday on proposed revisions to the county's Solid Waste Management Ordinance, officials said they expect the cost of burying and recycling trash to be about $53 per ton.County Attorney Charles W. Thompson Jr. said commissioners believed that raising the tipping fee by $25 -- from $15 per ton to $40 -- was enough to make the revised program operable.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
The county's proposed 10-year plan to deal with trash by recycling more of it, shutting down its landfill temporarily and establishing joint projects with other jurisdictions got generally favorable reviews last night from the public but not the private sector.Only a handful of people showed up at a joint meeting of the planning and public works boards at which the trash proposal had its first public airing. The boards will make recommendations to the County Council on whether to adopt or alter the plan.
NEWS
January 17, 1995
Late into the race, Harford County has emerged as a clear winner in recycling its solid waste. Last year the county recycled one-quarter of its trash, more than 50,000 tons of unwanted metal, glass and paper products and other detritus.That's well ahead of the 20 percent recycling goal set by the 1988 state recycling act for larger counties in Maryland. Harford's program has exceeded that standard, even without the 5 percent extra credit given by the state for the county's waste-to-energy incinerator at Magnolia.
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | September 15, 1996
THE NEVER-ENDING search for a panacea to our trash disposal dilemma now leads down the road of composting.All other magical solutions having fallen victim to reality, composting (or co-composting, as it is called today) now appears to be the method of choice for Carroll County.The dog-and-pony shows in distant states evidently persuaded a majority of Carroll's Three Wise Men to favor co-composting to process the county's solid waste in the next century.A much shorter junket to Howard County might have dispelled that notion of composting as a magic bullet.
NEWS
October 2, 1995
THE AMPLE EVIDENCE emerging suggests that Howard officials will ultimately soften their proposed plan to charge county residents fees based on the amount of trash they generate. In addition to an ambiguous answer from County Executive Charles Ecker as to whether he supports the proposal, other officials have been quick to point out the tentativeness of the plan.At a public hearing last week, irate residents all but promised that illegal dumping would be their response to a by-the-bag trash payment plan.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Anne Arundel County residents can empty their homes of unwanted pesticides, batteries, oil-based paint and the like at tomorrow's county-run collection of household hazardous waste.Last fall's collection, the county's biggest, attracted 1,300 people who dropped off 89,650 pounds of hazardous waste at the two locations, said Carol L. F. Taylor, a recycling administrator.Between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. tomorrow, hazardous materials, preferably in original containers, will be accepted at the Heritage Office Complex, 2662 Riva Road in Annapolis, and at Fire Department headquarters, 8501 Veterans Highway in Millersville.
NEWS
January 17, 1995
Late into the race, Harford County has emerged as a clear winner in recycling its solid waste. Last year the county recycled one-quarter of its trash, more than 50,000 tons of unwanted metal, glass and paper products and other detritus.That's well ahead of the 20 percent recycling goal set by the 1988 state recycling act for larger counties in Maryland. Harford's program has exceeded that standard, even without the 5 percent extra credit given by the state for the county's waste-to-energy incinerator at Magnolia.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff Writer | September 2, 1994
Democratic county executive candidate Theodore J. Sophocleus yesterday released an environmental program that would plant a million trees in four years.Sen. Gerald W. Winegrad, one of the state's best-known environmental legislators, immediately endorsed the program. He had expressed concern that such issues are being overshadowed in the election."I think it's the most comprehensive game plan and blueprint that I've seen put forth for any of our counties," Mr. Winegrad said. "And it could be a blueprint for our state of Maryland."
NEWS
By KEVIN THOMAS | February 6, 1994
You could almost hear the collective sigh of relief from Howard County officials when the announcement was made from Baltimore that the Pulaski Highway incinerator there may be rebuilt as a regional center for solid waste disposal.County Executive Charles I. Ecker called the news an "answer to a prayer.""I think it would be tremendous, not only for Howard County, but for the entire region," Mr. Ecker said.In fact, the prospect of building an environmentally safe, energy-generating incinerator has always been the light at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Anne Arundel County residents can empty their homes of unwanted pesticides, batteries, oil-based paint and the like at tomorrow's county-run collection of household hazardous waste.Last fall's collection, the county's biggest, attracted 1,300 people who dropped off 89,650 pounds of hazardous waste at the two locations, said Carol L. F. Taylor, a recycling administrator.Between 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. tomorrow, hazardous materials, preferably in original containers, will be accepted at the Heritage Office Complex, 2662 Riva Road in Annapolis, and at Fire Department headquarters, 8501 Veterans Highway in Millersville.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
After all of the politically correct methods of trash disposal -- recycling, recycling and recycling -- have been exhausted, burning is better than burying, a county solid-waste panel has concluded."
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | January 12, 1994
The county's proposed 10-year plan to deal with trash by recycling more of it, shutting down its landfill temporarily and establishing joint projects with other jurisdictions got generally favorable reviews last night from the public but not the private sector.Only a handful of people showed up at a joint meeting of the planning and public works boards at which the trash proposal had its first public airing. The boards will make recommendations to the County Council on whether to adopt or alter the plan.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | February 2, 1993
After all of the politically correct methods of trash disposal -- recycling, recycling and recycling -- have been exhausted, burning is better than burying, a county solid-waste panel has concluded."
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