Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCounty S Recycling
IN THE NEWS

County S Recycling

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 8, 1992
Carroll residents will be urged to "recycle more than the holiday spirit" this Christmas as county officials campaign to keep yuletide recyclables out of landfills.Residents may add non-metallic wrapping paper, Christmas cards, tissue paper and non-soiled paper tablecloths to the county's list of acceptable recyclable materials, said Micki Smith, deputy director of the county's Administrative Services Department."There are a lot of things people don't think about as far as recycling at Christmas," said Ms. Smith, who introduced to the county commissioners yesterday a marketing campaign for the holiday recyclables, slated to begin the week before Christmas.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | May 19, 2009
Baltimore County expects to launch single-stream recycling early next year, and officials hope that allowing residents to mix their paper, bottles and cans in the same containers will encourage greater participation in the curbside collection program. The county, which already has the highest recycling rate in the state, hopes to start the new system Feb. 1. It already is in place in Baltimore City and Howard and Anne Arundel counties. While ease of collection is the main incentive, Baltimore County officials think the cost savings also will prove appealing to the county's 240,000 households.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1994
Business at Carroll County's recycling center plunged when the center moved from an old barn on Route 97 north of Westminster to the Northern Landfill at Reese in October. Since September, the tonnage of recycled materials has dropped more than half.But the drop didn't cause even a small dip in the reported percentage of rubbish that county residents and businesses recycle. The county's year-end recycling report for 1993 shows that tons of yard waste diverted from the landfill in October and November more than made up for reduced collections from the recycling barn.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 19, 2009
In September, Howard County got an average of $74 a ton for the recyclable household trash that would have otherwise ended up in a landfill. Two months later, the county got nothing. Even as Howard County and other Baltimore-area governments work to encourage residents to recycle, they are seeing a sharp drop in the cash they get for scrap paper, plastic and metal. The bottom line is less money for governments searching for every spare nickel as revenue from other sources drops. "We're not getting paid," said Evelyn Tomlin, Howard County's recycling chief.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | June 14, 1992
The county's new voluntary trash recycling program netted 103 tons of yard waste and 110 tons of other materials in the first week of collection.Officials estimate that 11 percent of the garbage collected between June 1 and June 6 was recycled, including materials from the Susquehannock Environmental Center but not Aberdeen Proving Ground.bTC Administrators hope to recycle 20 percent of the county's garbage with the state-ordered program.County administrators and local haulers praised the program as they worked to smooth out a few rough spots.
NEWS
November 16, 1993
Like the premature rumors of Mark Twain's death, fears that Howard County's recycling program lags behind those in other jurisdictions are greatly exaggerated. Since recycling became a priority for Howard in 1988, the county has made steady strides to meet state-mandated goals. At this juncture, the county's effort to dispose of one-fifth of its waste through recycling is only 2 percentage points shy of the mark. There is no reason to expect thatthe county won't meet the goal by the beginning of next year, the state's deadline.
NEWS
May 16, 1993
Barn fire is arson, fire marshal saysA fire that destroyed a 30-by-60-foot metal pole barn northwest of Manchester last week was declared arson by the state fire marshal's office Friday, said Bob Thomas, chief deputy state fire marshal.The fire, in the 3700 block of Back Woods Road, was discovered shortly after 2 p.m. Tuesday by a neighbor, who said he who saw his cow run through a wire fence as it apparently tried to escape dense smoke from the barn.Farm equipment stored in the barn was destroyed in the blaze, which also scorched a larger barn about 25 feet away and burned some brush across a driveway.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | December 23, 1992
Two trash haulers face fines and suspensions of their licenses to operate in Carroll for failing to comply with the county's recycling ordinance, a county official said yesterday.The firms -- Browning Ferris Industries of Baltimore and Benchoff Trash Service of Westminster -- have each been sent a "notice of violation" and have until today to appeal the suspensions, said county Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman.Unless the firms appeal, their licenses to operate in the county will be suspended, effective Jan. 1, he said.
NEWS
By Samuel Goldreichl and Samuel Goldreichl,Staff writer | June 23, 1991
Harford government officials are lobbying Reynolds Aluminum to assist the county's recycling effort when the company doubles the size of its Joppa aluminum processing plant."
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | September 17, 1992
Responding to criticism from environmental groups and fro some of its own members, the Baltimore County Council has decided to strengthen the county's recycling goals.The move should come Monday night when the council votes on the county's revised 10-year solid-waste plan, which includes an option to build a garbage incinerator. A majority of the council supports that idea.The council also will vote on amendments offered by council Chairman William A. Howard IV, R-6th, and Councilman Melvin G. Mintz, D-2nd, that would broaden the recycling goals.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | December 2, 2008
The Baltimore County Council unanimously adopted a 10-year solid-waste management plan last night that included several recommendations aimed at fostering recycling. The result of a lengthy public participation process, the plan is like "a menu that we can work off of in the next 10 years," said Charles M. Reighart, the county's recycling and waste-prevention manager. The plan suggests transitioning to single-stream recycling for single-family homes and townhouses; creating economic incentives to encourage owners of apartments and condominiums to provide recycling opportunities to residents; and minimizing waste sent to landfills.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Anne Arundel County is expanding its recycling program to include several more plastics, papers and metals, as part of a larger effort to encourage residents to recycle half of what they dispose. Among the items now eligible for curbside recycling service are: plastic bags, plastic cups, plastic plates and plastic utensils, paper milk and juice cartons, and aluminum foil and pans. "There's no additional cost," said Richard Bowen, the solid waste recycling manager for Anne Arundel's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | September 10, 2002
In Baltimore City Council delays vote on plan to change Board of Estimates The City Council opted not to vote last night on a plan to wrest Baltimore's Board of Estimates from the mayor's control, sending the bill back to committee instead. The bill calls for eliminating two mayoral appointees from the five-member board - the city solicitor and public works director. That would leave three elected officials, the mayor, council president and comptroller. Even with council approval, the plan would have to survive a likely mayoral veto and win approval from voters as a ballot question.
NEWS
By Kathy Curtis and Kathy Curtis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 11, 1997
"KIDS CAN really make a difference in the community," says Betsy McMillion, coordinator of Howard County's recycling education program.Last Wednesday, students from west Columbia schools were honored for their contributions to recycling at a ceremony at the Howard Building in Ellicott City.The event was sponsored by the Recycling Division of the county's Bureau of Waste Management.Atholton High School senior Hei Cissy Ng was recognized for her efforts to increase recycling in her neighborhood.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Howard County Bureau of Waste ManagementSun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Though the county has reached the point where it can collect recyclable paper, cans and most bottles from all county homes, not everyone has -- or wants -- the free service.A lack of enthusiasm among a few apartment managers and condominium associations to accept the popular free service has left some residents without a benefit that most others in the county now enjoy."I'm a little distraught that we were never asked," said Sally Yasenka, who has lived for five years in a townhouse in Glen Meadows Condominiums in Columbia's Town Center, one of 13 complexes around the county that have refused the recycling pickup.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
At one time, recycling was something that took some effort, a sign of how much one cared about the environment.Those days are fading in Howard County, and with them will go "Sort with MoRT," the county's Mobile Recycling Truck.On June 30, the beige MoRT truck that has come to symbolize the county's recycling program will be retired after six years of service, now that recycling has become as ordinary and as easy as putting out the trash.All of the county's houses now get free curbside recycling pickup from the county.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
In early editions of The Sun yesterday, a brief article about Baltimore County's 10-year solid waste plan inadvertently left the impression that the county was on the verge of building an incinerator.In fact, the county's proposed 10-year solid waste plan calls for proposals from potential developers for some kind of waste disposal facility, whether it be an incinerator, waste energy facility or materials recovery plant. Those proposals would be sought within a year.Responding to criticism from environmental groups and from some of its own members, the Baltimore County Council has decided to strengthen the county's recycling goals.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | October 27, 1991
If throwing glass bottles, aluminum cans, newspapers, magazines and plastic containers in with the household trash is the routine at yourhouse, you have two years to change your ways.The county's recycling plan -- in the works since June -- was unveiled last week duringa meeting with Carroll's mayors.Should the commissioners adopt the plan's recommendations, every household in the county would be served by weekly curbside recycling,landfill dumping fees would at least double and recyclable materialswould be banned from county landfills.
NEWS
February 3, 1995
Blue BagsOn Jan. 11 The Sun published a letter to the editor from Carl Aron of Catonsville asking why participants in the county's recycling program must set out their bottles and cans in blue plastic bags rather than bins.The main reason for requiring plastic bags is that the bags cushion bottles and cans as they are trucked to the sorting facility, thus minimizing broken glass jars and bottles.The current demand for broken glass of mixed colors is weak, and most of that material is not recycled.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer | March 18, 1994
Howard County has exceeded expectations in meeting this year's state-mandated recycling goal, finding new uses for more than a quarter of the county's trash.The 1988 Maryland Recycling Act requires that counties with more than 150,000 people recycle at least 20 percent of their waste or be subject to a building moratorium.In the last half of 1993, nearly 26 percent of the county's waste was recycled, thanks in large part to an experimental trash-composting plant in Baltimore and beginning curbside collection for the last 20,000 county homes without the service, said Linda Fields, the county's recycling chief.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.