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NEWS
November 5, 1991
Municipal centersOpen Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.Baltimore County Resource Recovery FacilityCockeysvilleRecycle Way, off 10300 block of York Road, a block south of Warren Road.Eastern Sanitary LandfillWhite MarshDays Cove Road, off 11500 block of Pulaski Highway, a block east of Alexander Road.Western Acceptance FacilityHalethorpeTransway Road, off 4500 block of Hollins Ferry RoadRegional community centersDundalk, The Greening of Dundalk Committee Inc.North Point Government CenterRear parking lot, Merritt Boulevard and Wise AvenueSaturday, 8 a.m.-11 a.m.Essex, Back River Neck Peninsula Community AssociationKenwood Senior High SchoolStemmers Run Road and Marlyn AvenueSaturday, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.Hereford, North Baltimore County Recycling Committee Inc.L Graul's parking lot, Mount Carmel Road east of Interstate 83Sunday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.Owings Mills, Owings Mills Green ActionMTA Park and Ride Lot, Owings Mills Town CenterSunday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.Pikesville Grass Roots Recycling Inc.Milford Mill MTA StationEast parking lot, Milford Mill RoadSaturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.Towson, Towson-Parkville Recycling Committee Inc.Bendix parking lot on East Joppa RoadSaturday, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.White Marsh-Perry Hall, ETR Recycling Inc.IKEA parking lot near Honeygo BoulevardSunday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Lauren Eisenberg Davis | December 31, 2011
Some people count down the days to a major holiday, or a vacation. I'm counting down the days to my next recycling pickup. I've lived in Baltimore County a long time - long enough to remember the recycling center at the Owings Mills Metro on the weekends. But as recycling, and the greening of America, became more important, we saw many improvements: first to curbside pickup, which ultimately reduced our trash collection to weekly; and eventually to single-stream, where we could mix all our recycling together, no longer having to bin the paper, glass, metal and plastic separately.
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NEWS
By Sharon Hornberger | February 23, 1992
Do these quotes sound familiar?* "Let's move forward and stop fussing about what hasn't happened over the last year." -- CommissionerPresident Donald I. Dell.* "We've been wrong in a lot of instances, but let's take it fromtoday." -- Commissioner Julia W. Gouge.* "If our own staff figures are suspect -- and I think they are -- then I take the blame for that." -- Commissioner Elmer C. Lippy.What is the major issue thatthe county commissioners are referring to in these statements -- taxes, the budget, a new county police force?
NEWS
By By Mary Gail Hare | The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2010
Recycling in Baltimore County has increased by a third since the county began collecting bottles, cans, paper and plastic all together, officials said Wednesday. The switch to single-stream recycling in February has put the county on pace to save more than $600,000 this year, recycling and waste prevention manager Charles Reighart said. Trash generation has declined by 4.4 percent, he said, extending the life of the Eastern Landfill. "We knew people were eager to recycle," County Executive James T. Smith Jr. told reporters at the landfill in White Marsh.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | April 22, 1992
The county will extend curbside recycling to all 114,000 homes that receive county trash service by January, an official with the Bureau of Solid Waste said.Recycling trucks, which pick up waste plastic, newspaper, glass, cardboard and aluminum, will stop at 50,800 homesby Aug. 1, said county recycling coordinator Amy Burdick. The remaining homes will be added before the end of the year, she said.Under state law, by July 1994 the county must recycle 20 percent or more of the 460,000 tons of refuse it sends annually to the Millersville and Sudley landfills.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff writer | March 18, 1992
Sykesville's Tea Party -- in protest of a proposed county recycling tax -- may be over.The county commissioners yesterday said they would back a plan to exempt communities such as Sykesville, which already have a recycling program in place, from a proposed tax to financea countywide plan."
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | October 11, 1992
Counting aluminum cans, plastic, newspapers and othe items recycled in Sykesville, Carroll's recycling rate rose to 11.3 percent in August, up from about 8 percent in July, county officials said.County Comptroller Eugene C. Curfman initially reported last month that the county's recycling rate for August was 10 percent, but he noted that that figure didn't include the towns of Sykesville or Mount Airy."We're pleased to see the figure going up," said Dwight Copenhaver, county recycling coordinator.
NEWS
By Daniel P. Clemens Jr. and Daniel P. Clemens Jr.,Contributing writer | February 3, 1991
By design or by necessity, recycling soon will become a household word for Harford residents. But you'd never tell by the turnout at a public meeting on county recycling Thursday, county administrators say.One person showed up at Southampton Middle School in Bel Air for the meeting -- the first of four sessions on county recycling. The lone person represented a sanitation company based in Baltimore County."It's disappointing," said Robert Donald, deputy director of the Harford Department of Public Works.
NEWS
December 28, 1993
Carroll County Recycling Operations says residents' Christmas trees are recyclable. Trees will be ground up for mulch, and free mulch is available at county landfills.In return for recycling the Christmas tree, residents will receive a coupon for a free seedling, which can be redeemed in April. Remove all tinsel and ornaments from trees before taking them to be recycled.Here is a list of county Christmas tree recycling drop-off locations:* Northern Landfill, Route 140, Westminster; any time.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1997
Falling prices for recycled paper has caused a $160,000 shortfall in Howard County's recycling program -- and raised fears that it might someday be cheaper to send all the county's trash to landfills.For several years, Simkins Industries in Catonsville has charged the county nothing to crush its paper into 1-ton blocks, truck them to its plant and recycle them for sale on the wholesale paper market, said John O'Hara, the county's waste-management chief.But the declining price of recycled paper prompted Simkins in December to stop paying for the first step -- turning the paper into blocks for shipment.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
Anne Arundel County is expanding its recycling program to include several more plastics, papers and metals, as part of a larger effort to encourage residents to recycle half of what they dispose. Among the items now eligible for curbside recycling service are: plastic bags, plastic cups, plastic plates and plastic utensils, paper milk and juice cartons, and aluminum foil and pans. "There's no additional cost," said Richard Bowen, the solid waste recycling manager for Anne Arundel's Department of Public Works.
NEWS
July 23, 2006
Code home rule is focus of hearings The county commissioners have scheduled two public hearings on whether Carroll should consider adopting code home rule. All residents are welcome to comment on the proposal to have the voters decide whether Carroll should change its form of government. Information on code home rule may be found online at http:--ccgovernment.carr.org/ccg/codehom e. Comments also may be sent to the county attorney's office, 225 N. Center St., Westminster 21157. Public hearings will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Oklahoma Road Middle School on Oklahoma Road off Liberty Road, Eldersburg; and Aug. 1 at the County Office Building, 225 N. Center St., Westminster.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
A County Council bill that could make it tougher for a longtime oil recycling business to operate in North Point is the best way to ensure that communities have a say in their quality of life - or is an unfair effort to drive a single business out of town - a series of opposing speakers told council members yesterday. With a vote on the bill scheduled for Monday, members of the communities adjacent to the proposed site for a U.S. Filter Recovery Services plant near Back River and officials with the company used the council's work session to vent their concerns.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2004
Two Baltimore County councilmen introduced a bill last night that would require a zoning commissioner's approval for oil recycling facilities in areas zoned for manufacturing - a move that could prevent a North Point plant from operating. The proposal comes about a month after county officials rescinded their approval for U.S. Filter Recovery Services to operate an oil recycling facility in North Point. Although the company says it only recycles oil, county officials argued that the company's plan amounted to "refining" oil, requiring the company to seek a special exception from a zoning commissioner.
NEWS
December 3, 2000
The county Department of Public Works will hold its first "Bin it and Win it! Recycling Sweepstakes" drawing tomorrow morning in the canteen of the Heritage Office Complex in Annapolis. County Executive Janet S. Owens kicked off the sweepstakes and recycling-education campaign Nov. 15 as part of the national America Recycles Day celebration, aiming to reintroduce residents to the county's simplified, curbside recycling program and three permanent recycling centers. Over the next five months, the department plans nine drawings -- selecting winners from the names of 2,000 "finalists" identified by a roving prize patrol.
NEWS
October 27, 2000
GOOD NEWS: Carroll County has the highest waste recycling rate in Maryland, giving the Northern Landfill an estimated 50 years more of useful life. Not good news: The county's solid waste program faces an $18 million budget deficit over the next 10 years. Dumping rates at Carroll's only public landfill will have to be raised again to cover operating and debt service costs and to open another disposal "cell" at the facility. It's a reminder that trash disposal is ever more costly, even with significant efforts at massive, efficient recycling: 90 percent of the county's solid waste is shipped off to an incinerator and recycler in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
November 8, 1992
Harford County residents now can recycle their clippings, leaves and other yard waste free at four sites.The county landfill at Scarboro has been operating as a collection point for yard waste. This summer, with the start of a curbside trash-recycling program, the county banned yard waste from the landfill and the county incinerator to save landfill space and promote recycling.Three large containers for yard waste collection have been placed in Joppa, Fallston and Churchville, said Becky Joesting-Hahn, a county recycling official.
NEWS
December 8, 1992
Councilman Gray receives honorCouncilman C. Vernon Gray, D-3rd, received the governor's Salute to Excellence last week for his service as president of the Maryland Association of Counties."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1999
The county commissioners adopted yesterday a 10-year plan to extend the life of Carroll's Northern Landfill by recycling liquid waste and converting building debris into road construction material.After minor revisions, the 1999 Solid Waste Management Plan will be forwarded next month to the Maryland Department of the Environment, county officials said. The agency must approve the 271-page document before it can be implemented. The approval process is expected to take about 60 days."The bottom line is, we want to do things that will slow the use of the landfill's existing space or recapture some of the space," Gary Horst, the county's director of enterprise and recreation services, told the commissioners during a brief public hearing yesterday on the waste management plan.
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