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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
After a full week of classes, part-time jobs and family responsibilities, 15 Anne Arundel Community College students get together each Sunday afternoon to make their community a better place to live.Without fanfare, members of the local chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students are turning what they are learning at school into blueprints and models for municipal projects.Chapter President Julie DeStefano was shocked when she was told that the club was the winner of a 1996 Governor's Volunteer Award.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
George Arlotto this week became the third Anne Arundel County superintendent in as many years submitting a capital budget proposal - but he said working within the school system for 10 years helped him hammer out the $163.4 million request. "Not a lot of changes were made, based on what we've done in the past and where we're headed in the future," said Arlotto, who was the system's chief of staff before becoming superintendent in July. Arlotto replaced Mamie Perkins, who served as an interim superintendent for a year while the school district sought a permanent replacement for seven-year Superintendent Kevin Maxwell.
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NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1997
Two new growth restrictions proposed by Howard County Councilman C. Vernon Gray stalled at last night's council meeting.Gray, an east Columbia Democrat, had proposed lowering the county's growth cap by hundreds of homes a year and changing the rules to make it harder for west county developers to build dense housing projects.But the change in the county's growth cap is on the verge of dying for lack of support. And Gray himself has decided to delay action on the proposal affecting the density of west county projects.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | June 14, 2013
The detour for Moores Mill Road in Bel Air between Broadway (Route 1) and the Southampton Circle went into place as scheduled on Wednesday. That stretch Moores Mill will be closed to through traffic for at least 10 months, as the county straightens, widens and repaves the road, a $2.1 million project. Bob Thomas, spokesman for county government, said the next couple of weeks will involve setting up by the contractor, after which actual construction work will begin. Comer Construction of Forest Hill is the contractor.
NEWS
December 2, 1993
With all the national concern about health insurance, there's a certain appeal to a bill requiring contractors on Harford County construction projects to provide health coverage for their workers.Council President Jeffrey Wilson says his legislation would make bidders on county projects more humane, responsible employers, which would improve their reliability and productivity. Contractors would likely employ a more stable, experienced work force if they offered this benefit.However, the complex issue of health-care coverage is finally being worked out in Washington and Annapolis, with strong VTC hopes for a broader based system of coverage soon.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | November 19, 2003
Moving to raise money to pay for various county projects, the Carroll commissioners awarded $11 million in bond issues yesterday to Baltimore-based Legg Mason Wood Walker Inc. The interest rate of the 15-year issues, 3.3 percent, was the lowest among five bids received and also was the lowest for the county in recent years, county Comptroller Gene Curfman said, telling the commissioners, "The market has been going our way for a couple of days, and we...
NEWS
April 20, 1994
The Anne Arundel County delegation came away from the 1994 General Assembly session with money for schools and useful new legislation, but its most admirable accomplishment was steering clear of an ugly civil war over a new jail.For a while North County lawmakers were threatening to kill important South County projects, such as the rebricking of Annapolis' Main Street, if South County lawmakers voted to build the jail in Glen Burnie. Such retaliation would have pitted countians against each other and punished constituents who have nothing to do with the jail issue.
NEWS
By Susan Canfora | April 5, 1992
County officials consider tax increaseCounty officials, working on the budget for fiscal year 1992-93, will soon decide whether to increase property taxes. The current tax rate is $1.59 per $100 of assessed property value. County departments have requested $52.4 million in funding and the county expects to get $49.3 million in revenues. To balance those figures, the commissioners will either cut requests or raise revenues.A one-cent property tax increase would generate $211,000 according to John Yankus, county administrator.
NEWS
October 4, 1993
As the Columbia Association, the city's equivalent of a parks and recreation department, and county government move forward on separate and competing plans to build three golf courses in Howard County, the popularity of golf is being put to a test.The county, in a sense, has already flinched.Council Chairwoman Shane Pendergrass and Councilman C. Vernon Gray have expressed reservations about the county projects, insisting on seeing the results of a feasibility study of golf course needs.Their reservations effectively apply the brakes -- though not necessarily permanently -- to plans to finance two courses with about $14 million in county revenue bonds.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1996
What a difference a couple of weeks makes $300,000 worth of difference for the Howard County government.The culprit: Wall Street's bleak performance last Friday, last Friday's darkday on Wall Street,which saw sharply rising interest rates right before yesterday's scheduled bond sale to finance Howard County projects.Needing money for new schools, roads and other projects, Howard officials yesterdaysold $61 million worth of bonds yesterday to Prudential Securities Inc.The county will pay that back over the next 20 years at an annual interest rate of 5.34 percent.
EXPLORE
By Julianne Peeling | April 16, 2013
On June 8, the Domestic Violence Center of Howard County will host “Steppin' into a New Legacy,” a step show and basketball tournament aimed at raising awareness about the role men play in preventing domestic violence. According to the Domestic Violence Center's website, “Domestic violence and sexual assault are far too often viewed as a female-centered issue; one over which men have little voice and a lesser role to play.” However, DVC leaders believe violence is an issue that affects everyone and that men and boys must assume an active stand in helping to stop future acts of aggression.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | March 9, 2012
Target will be the first store to open in the $275 million Waugh Chapel Towne Center in Gambrills. Target will open Sunday, March 11, according to a release from the project's developer. Waugh Chapel Towne Centre is a 1.2 million square foot development that includes retailers, restaurants, offices and high-end townhomes and apartments. Other retailers opening at the Centre this spring include Dick's Sporting Goods, Panera, Petco and Old Navy. Wegmans is expected to open in October.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
After years of planning, a local astronomy group is moving closer toward building the first publicly accessible observatory in Howard County. The Howard Astronomical League, a club of amateur astronomers, planned to submit architectural drawings to the county this week as an initial step in a more formal application to construct the observatory at Alpha Ridge Community Park in Marriottsville. Joel Goodman, observatory chairman for the league, said the application marks the culmination of more than a decade of design work and fundraising.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | February 24, 2011
A crowd of more than 100 Ellicott City residents hurled questions and criticisms at county housing officials over plans to demolish and rebuild Howard County's 43-year-old public housing complex at a meeting at the Roger Carter Recreation Center on Wednesday night. People complained about the estimated $15 million cost of a proposed larger recreation center, skeptically questioned traffic conditions, worried about school crowding and suggested that mixing low-income and full-price renters in the same complex might not work.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2010
State environmental officials have halted construction on Maryland's second industrial wind project after finding "numerous" erosion-control violations on the remote Garrett County mountain ridge where an Annapolis-based developer is putting up 20 turbines. The Maryland Department of the Environment ordered Synergics Wind Energy and its contractor, White Construction, to stop work until they fix all the shortcomings in their measures to prevent mud from washing off the building site into nearby streams.
BUSINESS
By Megan Miller | Cumberland Times News (MCT) | April 11, 2010
Constellation Energy has finalized its acquisition of a Garrett County wind project, closing a deal for the $140 million, 70-megawatt Criterion wind farm with California-based Clipper Windpower Inc. The project, now under construction, is scheduled to go online by the end of 2010. The deal was first announced in November and closed Wednesday. As part of the agreement, Constellation will also purchase 28 of Clipper's Liberty wind turbines, which will be installed along the top of Backbone Mountain near Eagle Rock.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | November 11, 1997
A strong local economy has given Howard County a $12 million surplus -- and a host of county agencies are hoping for a piece of it.The surplus -- revealed in a recent audit -- is the largest for Howard since the boom years of the 1980s, when county officials regularly used big surpluses to pay for operating expenses such as salaries.A 1992 charter amendment pushed by County Executive Charles I. Ecker has changed the rules: Now, the surplus can be used only for building schools, paving roads or other one-time expenses.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | August 21, 1991
Hurricane Bob may have been a washout in Ocean City this week, but Carroll's commissioners hope to take the beach resort by storm.TheBoard of County Commissioners and several department heads will meetwith the Schaefer administration about county projects and state policy at the 41st annual Maryland Association of Counties Summer Conference.Transportation projects, recycling, the proposed Gillis Falls reservoir, delayed Project Open Space reimbursements and the status of the state's agricultural preservation and Resident Trooper programs top the county's agenda.
NEWS
February 25, 2009
Kudos to Prince George's County and efforts by officials there to lure the D.C. United professional soccer team to suburban Maryland. Several sites are reportedly under consideration, and if the new stadium is made more convenient to a Metro subway station than the parking profit center known as the Washington Redskins' FedEx Field, the project could be a real economic asset for the county and state. But the idea that the Maryland Stadium Authority might borrow money to underwrite a significant portion of this project seems dubious.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun Reporter | August 18, 2007
OCEAN CITY -- Local leaders say they favor a coordinated approach to planning for the thousands of military jobs expected to come to Maryland in the next few years -- as long as it doesn't mean giving up too many of their own priorities. Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, who is heading up Maryland's planning efforts for the military Base Realignment and Closure process, or BRAC, recently told local leaders that they will have to subordinate their parochial interests in favor of roads, schools, mass transit and other capital projects that are best for the region.
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