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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 30, 2004
Members of Howard County's agricultural land preservation board approved four applications to preserve small farms in the county's rural west last night. The farms, all between 20 acres and 32.5 acres, became eligible for Howard's program last year when the County Council approved changes to include smaller farms adjacent to preserved property or county lands. The program now oversees more than 13,000 acres. Landowners who place their property under agricultural easements still own it, but agree not to develop the land in exchange for small payments over time.
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NEWS
BiJoe Burris | August 8, 2014
The Howard County Library will hold events Monday designed to help prepare kindergartners for classes; and middle schoolers for the next step in their education journey. "Kindergarten, Here We Come" is a 45-60 minute event to help acclimate students to the school system, including teaching them little tricks of the trade -- such as boarding a school bus. The event is slated for the East Columbia branch, 6600 Cradlerock Way, Columbia, on Monday at 10:30 a.m. 410-313-7700 . Also slated for Monday is "Movin' Up to Middle School," an event that helps rising sixth graders transition from elementary school.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | December 1, 1997
Cheryl and Dale Poletynski's large new Rosedale home is a monument to communal living -- and a refuge for three frail tenants who otherwise would be hard pressed to find a place offering assisted living on their meager incomes.The couple is among a handful of families taking part in a landmark -- but little-known -- Baltimore County program called Adult Foster Care, the first of its kind in Maryland and now celebrating its 25th anniversary.The $50,000-a-year county program, the model for the state's much larger $5.3 million Project Home, pays families up to $1,000 a month to take low-income and elderly disabled people into their homes.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
With its four terraces of thriving plants sloping down toward a babbling lily pond, Jim Duke's garden could certainly be considered a healing place. And that's precisely what the world-renowned botanist and author's Green Farmacy Garden is. Featuring 80 plots that showcase 300 plants for whatever ails you — from addictions to yeast infections and everything in between — the garden is a living catalog of herbal medicine. From 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, the Howard County Conservancy will sponsor a lecture and guided tour of the garden at the Fulton home Jim Duke shares with his wife, Peggy.
NEWS
By Staff Report | August 5, 1994
This year's annual cake auction at the Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair broke the previous record, earning $23,800.50 for the county program and other projects, said Beverly Abbott, one of the auction's organizers.Of the total, $540 went to help send 4-Hers to the organizations National Congress in Florida this fall and $855 went to the Kimberly Baile Scholarship Fund, named for a 4-H member who died in a car accident about three years ago.
NEWS
December 11, 1991
The county commissioners voted Tuesday to have an information session and a public hearing on a proposed program to provide up-front money to farmers to save "critical farms" from development.Dates havenot been set but will be advertised.The county program has been proposed to preserve farms that are on the market, could be sold as part of an estate settlement or could otherwise be lost to agriculture because the owner is experiencing "extreme financial hardship" that leaves no alternative other than selling residential lots.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | August 27, 1992
State regulators identified "holes, gaps and omissions" in the county's 4-year-old Chesapeake Bay Critical Area program yesterday that they say keep it from working the way it was intended.Sarah Taylor, executive director of the state Critical Area Commission, and her staff met with the county's Critical Area Update Committee in Annapolis. The committee, appointed by County Executive Robert R. Neall, is reviewing the county program and will propose amendments this fall."Anne Arundel County has always been one of the stalwart supporters of the critical areas Peninsula but had been placed But, in the four years since the state approved the county's program, Ms. Taylor said, the commission has realized that "all that once was thought to be roses and glitter isn't.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | March 29, 1993
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden says he will introduce legislation to the County Council to create a farmland preservation program.The program would bring the county into conformance with new state regulations, although officials say they doubt it would be used much unless state agricultural preservation funds dry up.Since 1980, the county has participated in a state farmland preservation program that buys development rights to agricultural land....
NEWS
By Ronnie Greene and Ronnie Greene,SUN STAFF | November 20, 1996
Arguing that local businesses deserve an edge in local contracts, the Baltimore County Chamber of Commerce is pushing a "Buy Baltimore County" program as part of its 1997 legislative agenda.Among other issues topping the agenda, the chamber also opposes any measure that imposes a moratorium on construction around schools, and is against an effort to enhance the powers of the county agency that investigates bias in the work force.Making its pitch yesterday on the "Buy Baltimore County" program at a breakfast for business and political leaders, the chamber said millions of dollars in county and school board contracts filter to businesses outside the county or state each year.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | June 8, 1993
The Chesapeake Bay Critical Area Commission has given Anne Arundel County 90 days to eliminate loopholes within its shoreline protection program that relax the rules for certain construction projects.The 23-member panel declared two provisions of the county program "deficient" last week because, after more than a year of negotiations, the county's proposed revisions failed to tighten the loopholes, said Chairman John C. North II."They have made some of the changes we requested, others they have not," Judge North said yesterday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
An Anne Arundel County program that withholds tax refunds from people with outstanding warrants - and last year enticed hundreds of people to turn themselves in - could be expanded to Baltimore and possibly even statewide. The idea, tried by county Sheriff Ron Bateman, has produced impressive results. Last year, his office sent letters to 446 people with warrants, saying refunds wouldn't be mailed until they settled their legal issues. The result: 345 people - 77 percent of those notified - turned themselves in, including some who faced criminal charges for assault, drugs and prostitution.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2014
Four-year-old Meg Bittinger can check one item off her wish list thanks to the Howard County Recreation and Parks Department: She is learning to use a bow and arrow like her idol, Princess Merida, the heroine of the 2012 Disney movie "Brave. " Amy Bittinger, who lives in Elkridge, said her daughter "is really into princesses, but I want her to have a diversity of interests. " Archery lessons would please both of them, she reasoned, and so she became the first to register her child for the February session of Lil' Archers, an introductory class for 4- and 5-year-olds that uses rubber-tipped arrows.
BUSINESS
By Jon Meoli and Lorraine Mirabella, Baltimore Sun Media Group | February 7, 2014
Plans for redevelopment in downtown Towson have prompted area merchants to consider face-lifts of their own, spurring renewed interest in a Baltimore County program for commercial revitalization. To keep up with projects that will bring new stores, restaurants and residences to Towson's core, several York Road businesses are working through county programs that offer design advice from architects and interest-free loans for exterior improvements. "They know that things are changing, so they want to take advantage of the change so that all boats will rise with this tide of change," said Andrea Van Arsdale, director of the county's Department of Planning.
NEWS
February 6, 2014
After years of steady support for conservation, I am disheartened to hear that Gov. Martin O'Malley has decided to cut funds for land preservation programs in his proposed 2015 budget ( "O'Malley shifts funds from land preservation," Jan. 16). As a lifelong resident of the Chesapeake Watershed and past chairman of the board of the Howard County Conservancy, I have seen the value of protecting open space and connecting people to the land and our agricultural resources. There are a number of ways we have tried to do this.
NEWS
By Mark Newgent | January 28, 2014
The revelations of the secret audit of Xerox State and Local Solutions' operation of Baltimore's speed camera system showing the company had error rates 40 times higher than what city officials were telling the public, should prompt a review of speed cameras in other jurisdictions, including the state.  In June 2010, the same company, then known as ACS State and Local Solutions, won the contract to operate the pilot program for the Maryland SafeZones Program.  Xerox acquired ACS that same year.
NEWS
By George W. Nellies | November 4, 2013
The latest plane being rolled out of the hangar at Dallas Dance Airlines (also known as the Baltimore County Public School headquarters) should be grounded before it has a chance to take off. The recently announced plan to move to an eight-class semester from seven ("8 classes a semester for Balto. County high schools," Oct. 30) - is yet another far-reaching initiative coming at a time when teachers are still trying to cope with a new curriculum and a new teacher evaluation system.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | January 18, 1993
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has urged the county to continue financing a grass-roots program to monitor the health of Chesapeake Bay tributaries threatened by the shrinking of the county government."
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Staff writer | December 22, 1991
Foresters, environmentalists and municipal officials urged the county commissioners to create and administer their own forest-conservation program tailored to Carroll's needs.The environmentalists outnumbered a small group of developers who want to leave the program to the state.At a meeting attended by about 60 people Thursday, the commissioners heard public comment on whether to write their own law based on the state measure -- which is aimed at creating new woodlands and halting the loss of trees to development -- or to defer entirely to the state Department of Natural Resources' version.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2013
The transformation of a vacant, 12-story eyesore into a gleaming office building has brought workers, shoppers and diners to the northern edge of downtown Towson - thanks in part to a public financing package that waived repayment of millions of dollars in loans to a developer. The county makes so-called conditional loans that do not require repayment if certain conditions, such as job creation, are met. The $3.5 million in conditional loans to Caves Valley Partners for the Towson project would rank as the largest ever forgiven; others have provided $300,000 to demolish vacant Pikesville buildings and $40,000 to renovate a bank branch in Randallstown.
NEWS
November 1, 2013
Why should the county be expected to meet the needs of active healthy seniors? I am 72 and my husband is 81. We walk, we dance, we garden, we do most all our own maintenance and yard work. We heat with wood which means we cut down trees, haul wood and split and stack it. Let the county have programs for those that are less fortunate health-wise. Active, healthy seniors should be able to find plenty of activities to provide stimulation and exercise on their own without relying on the county!
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