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By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | October 21, 1998
Julia Walsh Gouge has played nearly all the parts on the county's political stage.She made her debut as a town councilwoman in Hampstead, moved on to become mayor there and then stepped into the county commissioner role.After a four-year hiatus, Gouge says she's ready to return to the drama of county politics.Based on the results of the primary election, it appears she has a receptive audience.Gouge emerged as the top vote-getter in a crowded field of 14 candidates on the Republican ballot.
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NEWS
June 9, 2014
I am deeply troubled by the hate mail from Connie DeJuliis that comes to my home every day. For years, Sen. Jim Brochin has come to the yearly neighborhood meetings in my community to tell about his accomplishments after each legislative session, and he has been on the side of the community. I have not always agreed with him, but I know that he is at least honest and willing to engage in a dialogue with others. As Mr. Brochin told The Sun last month, "my job isn't to do what Martin O'Malley tells me to do. My job isn't to do what Kevin Kamenetz tells me to. My job is to do what my constituents want me to do" ( "Brochin, DeJuliis square off in redrawn north county district," May 17)
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NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1996
During election campaigns, candidates parade before them. Once a month, they receive a private audience with the Howard County executive. The group even has its own memorial garden in Howard's busiest park.Not bad for a bunch of retired guys who five years ago began gathering in a Columbia basement to sip coffee and gab about their woodworking projects.The Howard County Woodworkers Guild illustrates a truism in the fast-growing, upscale suburban county: Behind all those new schools and new subdivisions, a hint of folksiness still drives its politics.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2013
Rebecca A. Orenstein, the first woman elected to the Westminster City Council, who was also a Carroll County political and environmental activist, died Aug. 31 of pancreatic cancer at Carroll Hospice Center's Dove House. She was 71. "Rebecca brought a strong feeling for those who might be shut out of the government process or were disenfranchised. She was an advocate for them," said Donna R. Engle, a former Baltimore Sun reporter who covered Ms. Orenstein. "And she would not hesitate to challenge authority or those in power," said Ms. Engle, who is now a retired Carroll County lawyer.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Dan Thanh Dang and Larry Carson and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Scott Wilson contributed to this article | July 28, 1996
Dale Anderson, the blunt, former Baltimore County executive and one of Maryland's most influential politicians until his 1974 conviction on federal extortion and tax evasion charges, died of a heart attack yesterday at his Kent Island home. He was 79.Hard-headed to opponents, Trumanesque to supporters, Mr. Anderson was the first major Maryland politician to be indicted by a federal investigation that culminated in the resignation of Vice President Spiro T. Agnew.Mr. Anderson served 13 months and two weeks in federal prison in Allenwood, Pa. Nonetheless, with characteristic defiance he maintained his innocence, proclaiming: "I'm not guilty, and I'm not going to let those bastards destroy me."
NEWS
August 8, 1995
Anne Arundel Circuit Court Judge Warren B. Duckett Jr.'s impending retirement due to complications from multiple sclerosis marks the end of an era in county politics. He has been a major player -- many would say the major player -- in the local Democratic Party for 25 years. He was Anne Arundel's chief prosecutor for 15 years and a judge since 1988, and his influence in the legal community has been considerable.Yet his predominant legacy is as a political figure -- a "good old xTC boy" who knew everyone that counted in local public life, who used his clout to help young comers, who loved the game of politics.
NEWS
September 21, 1990
The politicians we like best are those running scared. After so many incumbents were defeated in the primary election, Baltimore County is filled with this breed of politician. That's because some very basic assumptions of Baltimore County politics are changing.Anything can happen in November, particulary after yesterday's Court of Appeals reversal which will put a property tax referendum on the ballot.For decades one of the basic assumptions in county politics was that at least 40 percent of the electorate would take the time to vote in primary elections.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2002
Although Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr.'s campaign was successful in winning over the white, blue-collar precincts on the east side, an analysis of voting data shows that his entire margin of victory came from the rapidly growing and heavily African-American and Jewish precincts to the west, a drastic reversal of the electoral patterns that dominated county politics for decades. A Sun analysis combining final election results with census data shows that if all the precincts with above-average concentrations of black voters were subtracted from the county vote totals, Smith's opponent, Republican Douglas B. Riley, would be county executive.
NEWS
December 9, 1994
Rather than engage in a bruising political tussle, Carroll County's new board of commissioners parceled out titles and assignments in self-described "gentlemanly" fashion, based on the number of votes in the general election. As a result, the three commissioners -- W. Benjamin Brown, Donald I. Dell and Richard T. Yates -- expeditiously disposed of their organizational chores without resorting to a bare-knuckles brawl the likes of which soured relations on the last board.Four years ago, Mr. Dell decided that rather than automatically name the incumbent as board president as was standard practice, the top vote-getter should be designated president.
NEWS
November 2, 1994
Is it really surprising to any observer of Howard County affairs that Democrat Susan B. Gray has received no major campaign contributions from businesses or people connected to the development industry, as reported this week?Certainly a candidate for county executive who has been so openly hostile to the business community would not expect such assistance to roll in.Ms. Gray is banking on the perception -- indeed, she has fostered it -- that only she is above the influence of special-interest groups; in this case, the developers she says are wrecking the county by causing unbridled growth.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Dr. Drexel M. "Drex" Johnston, a retired Bel Air dentist and World War II pilot who was a lifelong aviation enthusiast, died July 6 of complications from a stroke at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center. He was 91. "Drex was a true Renaissance man, bon vivant and devoted husband," said Todd Holden, a former Aegis reporter and photographer who was a longtime friend. "He was both witty and caustic, and I enjoyed playing golf with him. " "He was quite unique and recognizable in both looks, carriage and deportment," said Sam Spicer, a fellow aviator and friend.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Marking a generational shift in Baltimore County politics, Del. John A. Olszewski Jr. is scheduled to announce Tuesday that he's running for the Dundalk-area Maryland Senate seat held by Sen. Norman R. Stone Jr. for almost 50 years. Stone, like Olszewski a Democrat, confirmed Monday that he intends to retire when his current term - his 12th in the Senate - ends after next year. The 77-year-old senator previously served a term in the House of Delegates, which by the end of his term would bring his total service in the General Assembly to 52 years - a Maryland record.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | April 11, 2013
Forty-one years ago, Maryland Gov. Marvin Mandel pulled off a series of staggering triumphs that The Sun compared to winning the Triple Crown: Maryland's first gun-control law; a unique, state-run auto insurance agency; and a higher gasoline tax to support Baltimore's first rapid rail line. He achieved this in the face of ferocious opposition from the National Rifle Association and the insurance and trucking industries. It took Mr. Mandel's enormous persuasive skills - including arm-twisting and deal-making - to win those monumental battles.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2011
Ellicott City blogger Frank Hecker has spent countless hours researching and writing about the history of council redistricting in Howard County — a topic he acknowledges is somewhat eye-glazing. "In and of itself, [redistricting] is not that interesting. What makes it interesting is it reflects the underlying politics in Howard County," Hecker, author of frankhecker.com, said Monday over hot chocolate at the Pottery Stop off U.S. 40. Hecker, a sales engineer for a California-based cybersecurity company, spent three to four hours writing each of the more than 20 1,000-word blog posts, which garner between 50 and 100 views.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2011
Ellen V. Schultz, a longtime Howard County activist, died Oct. 31 of a heart attack at Howard County General Hospital. The longtime Elkridge resident was 95. The daughter of a dairy farmer and a homemaker, Ellen V. Dove was born and raised in Birdsville. She was a 1933 graduate of Severn High School. A Howard County resident since 1942, Mrs. Schultz lived in Elkridge with her husband of 55 years, William F. Schultz, a construction foreman with Consolidated Engineering Co., who died in 1991.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 16, 2010
Thomas Dickerson Dawes, a retired civil engineer and former chairman of the Baltimore County Human Relations Commission who touched off a controversy in 1970 when he investigated several incidents of racial unrest in southeastern Baltimore County, died Nov. 5 of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care. Mr. Dawes died three days shy of his 85th birthday. Mr. Dawes was born in Baltimore and raised on a Falls Road farm that was purchased by his great-grandfather in 1859 and has remained in his family since that time.
NEWS
October 18, 1994
As much as he loves politics, Howard County Councilman C. Vernon Gray has another job, as a professor of political science ++ at Morgan State. If not at the university, his title in Howard County politics might as well be dean. After 12 years as a County Council member, he reigns as titular head of the county's Democratic Party and as one of the most powerful African-American politicians in Maryland.When Parris Glendening accepted the party's nomination for governor last month, he made a point of publicly thanking Mr. Gray for his backing.
NEWS
October 22, 2006
GOP endorsement of Johnson deplored As a loyal Republican, I was shocked to see the former Republican county executives endorse Sheriff George F. Johnson IV, who is running for county executive. I then reflected on the endorsements and thought that Del. John R. Leopold must be gaining on George Johnson. The Democratic Party had to do something bold. I am an outsider and have not been involved in county politics until recently, so I do not know all the history or personal issues involved.
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