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By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
If you are among the thousands of Howard County residents who hold a job outside the county and drive by yourself to work, you're part of a problem for county and state transportation planners.As they struggle to devise ways to meet a federal mandate to clean up the Baltimore region's smoggy air by 2005, they are finding their most daunting problem is the huge numbers of people who rely on cars to get to work. County planners say a majority of the county's labor force of 113,000 workers commute by car -- and about 64 percent, or more than 72,000, of them commute outside the countyThe primary goal of the planners: get county residents out of their cars and into buses, trains and car pools.
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NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | July 3, 1997
More than 300 people packed a public hearing in Harwood last night to demand that the Anne Arundel County Council adopt stronger measures to control suburban sprawl.The tone of the meeting at Southern High School was intense but more subdued than that of a similar hearing on growth-control measures in April, when protesters grumbled about "yuppie scum" and raised signs warning, "Meet the monster that could eat South County!"The council is holding several hearings this summer on revisions to its General Development Plan, a blueprint for construction over the next 20 years.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
The Baltimore County Board of Appeals approved plans yesterday for a 2,000-seat church in a cornfield at the Carroll County line, dealing a blow to neighbors, county planners and environmental officials who opposed the size and location of the building. The decision expands a 1999 ruling by county Zoning Commissioner Lawrence R. Schmidt that allowed Carroll Community Church to build a 1,200-seat sanctuary on a 70-acre tract at Mount Gilead and Emory roads (Route 91). The plans include an athletic field, classrooms and a lodge with sleeping accommodations.
NEWS
June 30, 2000
NOW, the real fun begins. The friend of a reclusive Columbia woman has lost his bid to gain control of the 300-acre Blandair Farm in Columbia, one of the largest undeveloped tracts in the county. Pending an appeal, county planners -- with citizen input -- may turn now to the task of laying out recreational areas for resident use. Environmentalists, abutting property owners and some influential political leaders will try to block the county's plan to install a number of lighted playing fields and parking spaces.
NEWS
August 15, 1999
Second person charged in Washington man's deathAnne Arundel County police have charged a second man with first-degree murder in the shooting death of a Washington, D.C., man last month.Terrence E. Casey, 23, of the 1100 block of F St., Washington, also was charged yesterday with using a handgun in the commission of a felony, police said.According to police, Curtis Ray Rawlings, 35, of the 1900 block of Naylor Road S.E., Washington, was found shot to death in a cornfield along Plummer Lane in Lothian on July 9.The other suspect, Darron Terrell Williams, 29, of the first block of Riggs Road N.E., Washington, was charged July 27 with first-degree murder and illegal use of a handgun in connection with the slaying.
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Though it remains one of the county's premier shopping corridors, the U.S. 40 strip in Ellicott City has become an aging symbol of commercial blight -- bypassed by retail "power centers" under development in and around Columbia.But an overhaul of the cluttered strip known as "Route 40" -- roughly three miles of gas stations, restaurants, car dealerships and offices stretching from Normandy Center Drive in the east to Bethany Lane in the west -- isn't likely soon.Even as it approaches the limits of its commercial capacity, the strip continues to grow.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Sun Staff Writer Staff writer James M. Coram contributed to this article | July 7, 1995
As cellular phones, pagers and wireless computers take over the glove compartments and coat pockets of Howard Countians, county officials have approved new rules aimed at preventing the new technology from taking over the county skyline.To improve the reception of cellular equipment, communications companies have barraged county officials with requests for zoning exceptions for new towers and thick metal poles for their cellular antennas. The county already has 30 communications towers and poles, ranging from 30 feet to 500 feet tall, with most in the 100- to-250-foot range.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | February 3, 2002
Howard County's lightning-quick pace of residential development is slowing, a trend that pleases citizens who feel boxed in by growth and is credited with pushing house prices sharply higher. In their just-released annual Development Monitoring System Report, county planners revealed that builders finished 1,904 houses and apartments between October 2000 and September 2001. That's a 24 percent drop from the previous 12 months - when 2,494 homes were added to the landscape - and the lowest number in half a decade.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | August 29, 1995
All it took was one elementary school student to illustrate Carroll County's lack of definitive adequate public facilities standards.Instead of quickly approving an eight-home subdivision near Manchester -- a blip on the county's busy development screen -- the county Planning Commission spent more than an hour last month agonizing about whether the project would overburden the area's schools."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2003
A nonprofit group hoping to build homes for seniors and property owners dreaming of turning residential land into retail gold were among those rushing to get in before the door closes on a once-a-decade rezoning effort in Howard County. For landowners eager to get on the comprehensive rezoning bandwagon and ride to new development prospects, time has - more or less - run out. County planners set yesterday as the deadline to file an application. Yesterday alone they received a dozen requests from the owners of more than 83 acres.
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