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NEWS
By James M. Coram and Kerry O'Rourke and James M. Coram and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writers | August 9, 1995
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker hired the Carroll County personnel director yesterday to do a similar job for his county.Jimmie L. Saylor, 41, will begin work as the Howard County personnel administrator Sept. 5 at an annual salary of $69,495. She was one of four people interviewed for the job, which involves overseeing all county personnel activities and advising the executive on personnel policy."Her knowledge of people, her ability to get along with people and her management leadership abilities are what impressed me about her," Mr. Ecker said.
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NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 15, 2003
Anne Arundel County residents may begin noticing fewer firefighters in densely populated areas of North County, but they'll likely see more red-and-white signs as firefighters protest planned staffing cuts, fire union officials said. Warning that inadequate staffing is jeopardizing public safety, the Anne Arundel Professional Firefighters began an information campaign yesterday morning in front of Fire Department headquarters in Millersville. The rallies - expected to be held daily at various fire stations - are aimed at drawing attention to "the fragility of the county's emergency services," said union president Keith W. Wright.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | January 30, 1991
Despite an expected $25 million drop in county revenues next year, the county personnel board asked the Ecker administration Monday to try to give employees some sort of merit pay increase for satisfactory performance.For more than a decade, the county has given a 5 percent merit raise annually to employees whose work is deemed satisfactory. The county also paid premiums to workers who have special skills or work odd hours, as well as cost-of-living adjustments and longevity bonuses.County Executive Charles I. Ecker, faced with an expected budget shortfall of at least $25 million for the fiscal year beginning July 1, had asked the personnel board to consider three pieces of legislation that would allow the county to omit the raises this year.
NEWS
January 7, 2001
Mark M. Atkisson promoted to job of personnel officer Mark M. Atkisson, personnel manager in the Department of Public Works, was promoted Friday to county personnel officer, a job he had been filling on an acting basis since Randall J. Schultz resigned in the fall. "We need someone who, over the long haul, can bring the county's personnel system into the 21st century," County Executive Janet S. Owens said in announcing the appointment. "Mark has the experience to do that." Atkisson, 46, will be responsible for recruitment, benefits, leave, labor relations and disciplinary action for about 4,000 county workers.
NEWS
By Staff report | January 5, 1993
Carroll's commissioners said yesterday they do not want county personnel to review sprinkler plans for homes in the City of Westminster because workers do not have time.The city is considering adopting an ordinance that would require sprinklers in new duplexes and single-family homes and in homes that are converted into apartments.City officials asked the commissioners whether county personnel could review the plans to make sure they comply with the ordinance, if it is passed.The city does not employ anyone with the technical knowledge to review the plans.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
Carroll County government staff will hold a meeting to hear comments on two proposed ordinances at 3 p.m. Thursday in Room 300A of the County Office Building in Westminster.One ordinance concerns illegal discharges into storm sewers, and the other addresses county personnel policies. Comments will be taken at Thursday's meeting in preparation for public hearings on the ordinances at 10 a.m. and 10: 30 a.m. Nov. 19.The Storm Water Management Ordinance would prohibit illegal discharges into the storm sewer system.
NEWS
By TANOAH v. STERLING and TANOAH v. STERLING,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1995
Several county police officers who thought they would get raises and promotions this year won't because the county personnel board has ruled that the results of the promotion test should be thrown out and a new test given.The board decided that the results of the sergeants test were "tainted" because a lieutenant charged a fee for a preparatory class.The strongly worded decision assailed upper management in the department for allowing Lt. Ronald Bateman, a night shift supervisor in the Eastern District, to give the course.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | May 6, 1993
A controversial plan to save Baltimore County money by changing the way county workers are paid for accident leave has still not been implemented more than a month after an agreement was announced between union leaders and County Executive Roger B. Hayden.County personnel director Richard N. Holloway told the County Council Tuesday that he is to meet with Mr. Hayden Monday to iron out glitches in the plan and may present rule changes to implement it to the county Personnel and Salary Advisory Board at its meeting May 26.Union leaders said they discovered after the compromise was announced March 30 that fire and police officers would lose substantial pay under the plan, which calls for hurt workers to get their normal take-home pay while on accident leave instead of the tax-free, full pay that gave them up to 120 percent of their normal take-home wages.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | January 30, 1993
One day after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor drug charge, a key Baltimore County personnel worker was reinstated to her $47,559-a-year job, a decision some county workers find disturbing in light of impending layoffs.Jo Anne Kincer, 35, director of the county's personnel records management section, had been suspended without pay since October, a month after police raided her Parkton home and found 31 marijuana plants growing in a backyard greenhouse and 19 pounds of packaged marijuana worth an estimated $60,000.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 1, 1992
TC A Howard County Police Department employee was fired last week after a routine audit of the property section uncovered the gradual theft of more than $3,000 in cash.No criminal charges have been filed. Police are continuing their investigation of the theft, in which small amounts were stolen several times during 1989. Records for other years are also being investigated."I am extremely disappointed it happened," said Police Chief James N. Robey. "We are reviewing our entire process down there to assure it won't happen again."
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
The Anne Arundel official responsible for guarding county employees' rights has been accused by his former secretary of retaliation after she complained to him about his alleged close relationship with another female employee. Jacquelyn Edelen-Dyer, 51, claims that county Personnel Officer Randall J. Schultz punished her in May by making verbal threats and banishing her for about two months to a job without any purpose - essentially sorting job applications into piles - after she requested to move to a different department.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | August 16, 2000
The Anne Arundel official responsible for guarding county employees' rights has been accused by his former secretary of retaliation after she complained to him about his alleged close relationship with another female employee. Jacquelyn Edelen-Dyer, 51, claims that county Personnel Officer Randall J. Schultz punished her in May by making verbal threats and banishing her for about two months to a job without any purpose - essentially sorting job applications into piles - after she requested to move to a different department.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 19, 1999
Union leaders will try to challenge an appellate court ruling this month that took away back pay an Anne Arundel County Circuit judge had awarded government employees who claimed their workweek was increased but their paychecks were not."I think the court just simply was wrong," said Francis J. Collins, lawyer for the blue-collar and clerical employee locals of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees who work for Anne Arundel government.An estimated $600,000 is at stake.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 23, 1999
As one of a number of staff changes in the new Anne Arundel County administration, County Executive Janet S. Owens accepted yesterday the resignation of E. Hilton Wade Jr., the county personnel officer.Wade, 63, a career human resources administrator from Savage, was appointed to the position in May 1995 by Republican John G. Gary, whom Owens, a Democrat, defeated in November."I like Hilton, but this will give me the opportunity to put my stamp on an office that affects the lives of every county employee," Owens said.
NEWS
November 11, 1997
Carroll County government staff will hold a meeting to hear comments on two proposed ordinances at 3 p.m. Thursday in Room 300A of the County Office Building in Westminster.One ordinance concerns illegal discharges into storm sewers, and the other addresses county personnel policies. Comments will be taken at Thursday's meeting in preparation for public hearings on the ordinances at 10 a.m. and 10: 30 a.m. Nov. 19.The Storm Water Management Ordinance would prohibit illegal discharges into the storm sewer system.
NEWS
May 18, 1997
Lawn equipment is dangerous; treat it that wayWhile driving through my neighborhood on a beautiful Sunday morning in late April, I witnessed something frightening.A man was cutting his lawn using a power mower, with a young child riding on the back of the mower and another young child frolicking in the grass, running in circles around the mower. Have you ever been to a hospital emergency room on a nice spring day? You would probably find several children and adults who have been injured by power garden equipment; eye injuries from flying debris, missing fingers and toes, all manner of cuts, bruises and burns, and occasional fatalities.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | May 16, 1991
County Councilman David G. Boschert wishes Anne Arundel's police andfirefighters were as thin as his patience.Boschert, D-Crownsville, wants to know what happened to legislation he pushed through the council giving the county personnel officer authority to set up physical agility standards for public safety workers.The legislation was passed in 1986. No one has been tested yet, County Personnel Director Richard Mayer said during budget hearings yesterday. Annual physical fitness examinations would cost $200,000, and the county does not have the money, he said.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | January 2, 1991
A Baltimore County councilman is asking the county executive to consider paying county workers who serve in the reserves the difference between their county salaries and their military pay if they are called to active duty for Operation Desert Shield.Councilman Vincent Gardina, D-5th, said that 10 county employees in the reserves have been called to active duty so far and that another 150 could be called up.Mr. Gardina said that the four police officers, four firefighters, one correctional officer and one part-time physician activated so far risk losing an average of about $10,000 per year because their military pay is lower than their county salaries.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
Anne Arundel County's Ethics Commission is investigating whether the Gary administration has filled jobs with hand-picked candidates boasting better personal contacts than qualifications.Already, the confidential investigation is turning into a legal showdown between the Gary administration and an ethics commission criticized in recent months as ineffectual. The county personnel officer, E. Hilton Wade, failed to meet a Monday deadline to turn over employment files the commission had subpoenaed.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | June 27, 1996
Anne Arundel's Ethics Commission is investigating whether the Gary administration has filled jobs with hand-picked candidates boasting better personal contacts than qualifications.Already, the confidential investigation is turning into a legal showdown between the Gary administration and an Ethics Commission criticized in recent months as ineffectual.The county personnel officer, E. Hilton Wade, failed to meet a Monday deadline to turn over employment files the commission had subpoenaed.The Ethics Commission's new executive director, Betsy K. Dawson, went back to court late Monday and obtained an order threatening Wade with contempt of court charges if he doesn't produce the files by Saturday.
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