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By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
After investing $700,000 to renovate a struggling White Marsh motel and restaurant he bought two years ago, Ronald Parker was worried that a battle over the decades-old sign could cost him his business. Parker, a 67-year-old attorney who lives in Harford County, lost a Baltimore County administrative hearing earlier this year after a resident reported that signs at the business, the Williamsburg Inn on U.S. 40, were too large and didn't conform to current county standards. "To me, it's ludicrous," Parker said.
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NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
After investing $700,000 to renovate a struggling White Marsh motel and restaurant he bought two years ago, Ronald Parker was worried that a battle over the decades-old sign could cost him his business. Parker, a 67-year-old attorney who lives in Harford County, lost a Baltimore County administrative hearing earlier this year after a resident reported that signs at the business, the Williamsburg Inn on U.S. 40, were too large and didn't conform to current county standards. "To me, it's ludicrous," Parker said.
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 14, 1993
Coni and David Humphrey have had to watch as beautiful old chestnut and walnut trees were bulldozed and burned this fall to make way for a subdivision around their house on WTTR Lane in Westminster.But it won't happen again, Mrs. Humphrey tells friends, now that Carroll County has a forest conservation ordinance.In fact, it could happen again even though the ordinance encourages developers to preserve wooded tracts. But the Carroll County Board of Commissioners is considering changes in the law that the local "green" community fears will make it easier for developers to clear trees from land they are subdividing.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
Montgomery County residents are facing a "credit crisis" in which they may not be able to obtain home-equity loans or may have trouble buying and selling a home, an industry trade group said, blaming a local fair-housing law that is garnering national attention. The Mortgage Bankers Association blames a new county ordinance that expands the definition of discriminatory lending practices and increases the maximum penalty to $500,000 per violation. More than two dozen lenders have said they plan to suspend or curtail lending in the county because of the ordinance, which is set to take effect tomorrow unless it is derailed at the last minute by a court challenge.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
A Howard County Circuit Court judge has ordered the county to pay the Pack Shack, an Ellicott City adult book and video store, $187,690 in court costs after the county lost a legal battle in trying to make the business relocate. Judge James B. Dudley's ruling - which was filed Friday and mailed to lawyers Tuesday - awarded the business, on U.S. 40 near Normandy Woods Way, somewhat less than the $224,837 it had sought. "It clearly vindicates my client's First Amendment rights," lawyer Howard J. Schulman, who represents the store, said yesterday when he learned of the ruling.
NEWS
December 13, 1995
The Sykesville Town Council has reviewed, and might adopt, a county communications tower ordinance, which regulates placement, construction, number and type of towers."
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | March 7, 2006
Montgomery County residents are facing a "credit crisis" in which they may not be able to obtain home-equity loans or may have trouble buying and selling a home, an industry trade group said, blaming a local fair-housing law that is garnering national attention. The Mortgage Bankers Association blames a new county ordinance that expands the definition of discriminatory lending practices and increases the maximum penalty to $500,000 per violation. More than two dozen lenders have said they plan to suspend or curtail lending in the county because of the ordinance, which is set to take effect tomorrow unless it is derailed at the last minute by a court challenge.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
The Carroll commissioners yesterday questioned Mount Airy's forest conservation law, which calls for any fines collected in the town to be returned there for tree plantings."
NEWS
November 9, 1992
If the Carroll County commissioners are undecided about a proposed forest conservation measure, they ought to adopt the measure recommended by a citizen's committee. The group has written an ordinance that carries out the state mandate to protect woodlands and yet is responsive to the county's needs.After the committee worked on the measure for 12 months, holding dozens of meetings and public hearings to work out an acceptable compromise measure, the commissioners are now on the verge of scrapping the group's work.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1996
Philip Marcus can park his car along an Ellicott City road near his house, but if he slaps a "For Sale" sign in the window, he is breaking the law.That's because Howard County -- where the cherished ideals of democracy hang in the balance with aesthetics and property values -- is the only county in the Baltimore metropolitan area that prohibits the traditional American practice of the roadside "park-n-sell."A 21-year-old county ordinance bans people from advertising their cars by parking them along public roads -- essentially anywhere except driveways and privately owned parking lots.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 9, 2004
A Howard County Circuit Court judge has ordered the county to pay the Pack Shack, an Ellicott City adult book and video store, $187,690 in court costs after the county lost a legal battle in trying to make the business relocate. Judge James B. Dudley's ruling - which was filed Friday and mailed to lawyers Tuesday - awarded the business, on U.S. 40 near Normandy Woods Way, somewhat less than the $224,837 it had sought. "It clearly vindicates my client's First Amendment rights," lawyer Howard J. Schulman, who represents the store, said yesterday when he learned of the ruling.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | April 11, 2002
Attempting to resolve a problem that members alternately described as "a burning concern" and a process so complicated it gives one member "ice cream headaches," the county Board of Education heard ways last night to improve the method of predicting student enrollment from year to year. A committee of local and state planners, parents and school staff recommended that the school system enhance its use of the spreadsheet-based calculation of past grade-to-grade ratios by tracking new and proposed housing developments and by cooperating with officials from the county and Carroll's eight municipalities.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
Poplar Point residents protesting a Sprint PCS cellular tower did not get the opportunity to present their case during a county Board of Appeals hearing last night and were stunned by the board's decision to resume the hearing in October, in effect dragging out a protracted dispute between the Edgewater community and Sprint. "This suits [Sprint] to have it postponed for months and months," said Pia Vining, a Poplar Point resident who lives within the topple zone of the 130-foot tower with her husband, Winfield, and their 2-year-old son, Blake.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2001
Pia Vining took the call on her cell phone as she was driving home, and she heard an ominous tone in her husband's voice. "Honey, there's something I need to tell you," he said. "Before you drive into our yard, you should know that the tower is up." Vining said it hit her "like a blow to the stomach." As she pulled into her driveway in Poplar Point she was greeted by a 130-foot cellular telephone tower rising out of the landscape next door - despite an Anne Arundel County ordinance once seen as a model for curbing the proliferation of towers in residential neighborhoods.
NEWS
October 20, 2000
CARROLL COUNTY'S efforts to limit the location of sexually oriented businesses is both belated and foresighted. Belated because many counties have already dealt with the problem, enacting laws and defending them in appeals courts. All of which is a benefit to Carroll in its first crack at the issue. Foresighted because the influx of topless bars and adult bookstores that often follows expanding population has thankfully not yet hit here in full force. The ordinance proposals may not, however, promptly resolve the immediate controversy, a new Eldersburg video store that has an "adults only" section separated from its main retail area.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
Stymied for seven years, the developer of a proposed 1,372-house subdivision in Anne Arundel County is threatening to sue the county unless the project is allowed to go forward in the Solley area of Marley Neck. County approval seems unlikely, because the denial was based on a lack of space in area schools, and County Executive Janet S. Owens has refused to grant exceptions to developers if classrooms cannot handle the influx of students a new community would bring. "The Owens administration made a pledge not to issue any waivers for schools, and Ms. Owens has stuck to it," said county spokesman John Morris.
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Commission reviews water managementSykesville needs to improve its storm water management ordinance, the town's Planning and Zoning Commission was told this week."
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2001
Poplar Point residents protesting a Sprint PCS cellular tower did not get the opportunity to present their case during a county Board of Appeals hearing last night and were stunned by the board's decision to resume the hearing in October, in effect dragging out a protracted dispute between the Edgewater community and Sprint. "This suits [Sprint] to have it postponed for months and months," said Pia Vining, a Poplar Point resident who lives within the topple zone of the 130-foot tower with her husband, Winfield, and their 2-year-old son, Blake.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2000
Members of the Anne Arundel County Council are exploring whether the council should strip County Executive Janet S. Owens of the power to grant waivers to developers. The discussion comes amid reports that Koch Homes, a major developer in Anne Arundel, received clearance to build an 18-house subdivision in violation of county ordinance. Council Chairman Daniel E. Klosterman Jr. said imposing a moratorium on waivers would be "drastic" and that he would have to see evidence that developers routinely receive improper permission to build.
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