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September 24, 2013
What do you think the odds are that Ken Ulman and Courtney "Speed Camera" Watson will learn anything from the recent destruction of the new, semi-permanent speed camera that was recently destroyed in Glenelg? I doubt they will learn a thing. Perhaps if listening to the voters was something they ever thought of doing in the first place, this would not have happened. First, they manufactured evidence that the cameras were necessary, with their phony report that Watson so famously waved in the faces of those testifying against the one-eyed bandits in the hearing 1 1/2years ago. Then, after they loaded up the hearing room with county employees and used "heart-wrenching" testimony about an incident that occurred over 20 years ago to justify their position, they forced photo enforcement upon us. Just over a year later, we learn that the program barely brings in a fraction of the expected revenue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | September 8, 2014
A run-down uninhabited house at 506 Locksley Road that has been the subject of complaints for the last two years from West Towson neighbors has been sold, County Councilman Marks said. "We're happy to get this resolved," said Marks, who represents Towson. "It's been an eyesore. The county worked very, very hard on this. " Marks said the winning bidder was a builder with plans to raze the structure. The auction company, A.J. Billig & Co., confirmed the sale but would not identify the buyer.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
The Howard County Office of Consumer Affairs is investigating Verizon's sales practices after the office received a half-dozen complaints, county officials said. Officials allege that the company's sales representatives have attempted to confuse customers and overcharge them for services they did not ask for when selling packages for cable, phone and Internet service. Sharyn Tolkach, a teacher from Columbia, said she saw an item on her bill called "cyber tube" for five months before she could get Verizon representatives to remove the $14.95 charge from her monthly statement.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Baltimore County officials are praising a Maryland Court of Appeals ruling that the county didn't need to hire a third party to settle a 2011 dispute with the police union. The dispute centered on an incentive program the county started in 2010 to encourage good attendance among employees. If a worker used no sick time for a year, he or she would get money to buy a $100 savings bond and a congratulatory letter from the county executive. But the program was "only modestly successful," according to county officials, and the savings bond component was ended the next year.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2010
Baltimore County officials Monday were investigating the circumstances surrounding a carbon-monoxide leak in a Pikesville house that claimed the lives of two construction workers who lived there. The two-story house in the 4100 block of Colby Road was not equipped with a carbon-monoxide detector, according to investigators, who withheld the names of the two dead men until relatives could be notified. Media reports identified the men as Enael Lemus and Nelvin Salguero. Eight other people who lived in the two-story house, as well as three police officers, were taken to the emergency room at the University of Maryland Medical Center after discovery of the leak Sunday morning.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2012
Howard County Executive Ken Ulman is expected to unveil his budget proposal April 20, despite the uncertainty of state funding. Ulman and county budget administrator Ray Wacks gave few details this week, saying the uncertainty at the state level has created an added challenge in making the county's annual operating budget. "We haven't really made up our minds," Wacks said. "The level of uncertainty is pretty high right now. " If the state's "doomsday budget" goes into effect, Howard could stand to lose about 1 percent of its budget, or as much as $9.6 million in state aid for schools, community colleges and the library system, Wacks said.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
The Howard County administration is backing off a proposal to revise the county code - with new rules regarding livestock on small properties and a new definition of a farm - after local horse owners raised an uproar about it. "I think they're getting phenomenal heat," said Susan Gray, a land-use attorney and horse owner who had opposed the changes. Gray and others said the revisions would have posed a threat not only to horse owners, but to 4-H clubs and all agriculture in the county.
NEWS
February 22, 2012
The Frederick County Board of Commissioners voted Tuesday night to adopt an ordinance making English the county's official language, the Frederick News-Post has reported. According to the newspaper, the board voted 4-1 to approve the law, which replaces a previous nonbinding resolution. The measure appears more symbolic than substantive, and does not override federal or state laws requiring the use of other languages in certain circumstances. Nor does it prevent county officials from using other languages in emergencies or to communicate with criminal suspects.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
County Executive Laura Neuman said last week that she will work with the county school board and the county's delegation in Annapolis to petition state officials to fund the long-awaited Severna Park High construction project, which is scheduled to begin this year. Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget proposal for fiscal year 2015 raised eyebrows in Anne Arundel when it included $18.8 million as the state's contribution toward the county's school projects but made no provision for $25.2 million the school system had requested to begin construction of Severna Park High's replacement.
NEWS
January 28, 2014
When I first spotted the article on pay raises for the Baltimore County executive and County Council members, I thought there was no way citizens would allow that to happen ( "Balto. Co. Council approves raises for council, executive," Jan. 22). Well, I was wrong. I am beside myself over their voting themselves huge raises when we taxpayers are footing the bill. Why do they deserve a 14 percent to 16 percent increase when they are only giving county workers a 2 percent or 3 percent cost-of-living increase in 2015?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
A Calvert County circuit judge has overturned the Southern Maryland county's decision to exempt the proposed Cove Point liquefied natural gas export facility from local zoning regulations. It's not clear, however, whether the decision affects plans for the $3.4 billion project. Judge James P. Salmon declared that Calvert County acted illegally in freeing Cove Point, now the site of a liquefied natural gas import terminal, from having to comply with the county's zoning ordinance. In doing so, the judge said, county officials violated Maryland's constitution by treating Dominion, the Virginia-based energy company that owns the site, differently from other property owners.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Anne Arundel Community College is increasing its presence at North County High School, giving nearby residents expanded opportunities this fall to take courses in math, literature, drawing, psychology — even belly dancing — without leaving their backyards. And as the college increases offerings through its off-site college programs, North County High Principal Julie Cares sees the expansion as a way to make her high school campus a greater focal point for the community. "We're trying to create a community environment here," Cares said.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The speed camera company blasted in Baltimore for issuing tickets to people who weren't speeding is now facing criticism in Howard County, where it submitted a year's worth of inaccurate data about the program there. Data submitted by Xerox State & Local Solutions for the county's four cameras repeatedly listed more vehicles speeding than there were cars on the road, according to documents reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The 2013 data sometimes reported that 200 percent, 400 percent or even 600 percent of the number of cars that passed by a camera were speeding.
NEWS
By Will Fesperman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Anne Arundel County officially opened a new water access point Wednesday in Shady Side, an offshoot of a citizen-led effort to increase public access to bodies of water. More than 70 residents and county officials attended the ribbon-cutting ceremony at Shady Side Park, and officials said attendees brought more than 30 kayaks to give the new facility a test drive. The access point - on Parish Creek, which feeds into the West and Rhode rivers - offers enthusiasts a place to put in their kayaks, canoes, inner tubes and paddleboards.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Officials in Baltimore County reacted Friday to a proposal by Catholic Charities to shelter 50 immigrant children at a facility in Timonium, with a state delegate who is running for the County Council opposing the plan and calling the immigration crisis "a federal problem. " "I do not support this proposal at all," said Del. Wade Kach, a Republican who is a candidate for County Council in the district where the children would be housed. "I just have a real problem with the states and communities bearing the brunt of a problem that was created by the Obama administration," he said.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2014
Deputy sheriffs at the Baltimore County circuit courthouse in Towson say their dwindling numbers and inability to hire new employees in the past four years has left them increasingly concerned about security. Union leaders say the small agency is being ignored by the county. "We're lucky we haven't had any major incidents," said Steve White, president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 25, which represents more than 60 deputy sheriffs. The union says 11 deputies have left since 2010, and their positions have not been filled.
NEWS
December 14, 1990
As expected, the recent proposals advanced by the Governor's Commission on Growth in the Chesapeake Bay Region drew quick criticism from overly protective county officials. Complaining of unwarranted state intervention, they oppose state guidelines in shaping new growth and preserving farmland and green spaces.Ironically, the loudest grumbling comes from jurisdictions that best make the case for such uniformity. Newly installed Howard County Executive Charles Ecker, for instance, says the plan would usurp "local control" of land use planning.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Michael Dresser and Lynn Anderson and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2003
Anne Arundel County officials got mixed news at the state Board of Public Works meeting yesterday in Annapolis. They received $1.1 million to preserve a horse farm in West River but failed to win support to expand a park in Harmans. County officials said they were thrilled to receive state Rural Legacy funds to protect the 179-acre Leatherbury Farm. "I cannot express how excited I am that we have been able to preserve this beautiful horse farm," said County Executive Janet S. Owens. "This preservation provides a solid block of protected land that stretches from Route 255 in Owensville nearly down to Route 258 in Deale."
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
Baltimore County Public Schools officials on Tuesday pledged to improve communications with Rodgers Forge residents regarding updates and revisions of a controversial proposal to renovate Dumbarton Middle School - a project that involves removal of several historic trees on the property. The $27.5 million plan calls for additions and renovations to make the 58-year-old school compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, bring the interior up to 21st-century standards and improve traffic flow and safety.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Carroll County has agreed to pay a $40,000 penalty after a federally led inspection found the county had failed to properly protect its streams and waterways from polluted stormwater runoff. The Environmental Protection Agency announced earlier this week it had reached a settlement with the county, in which local officials agreed to pay the fine and correct federal water pollution violations found more than two years ago. The agency accused the county of failing to identify all the outfalls where stormwater runs into streams and rivers, not inspecting construction sites often enough, failing to check all county facilities for runoff controls and not providing a hotline for residents to report illegal discharges into storm drains.
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