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NEWS
February 27, 1995
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has passed through a storm of criticism, and now has embarked on a new journey with a newly elected chairwoman.But in Anne Arundel County, the local branch of the NAACP still is being tossed about on the waves of controversy.During last fall's local NAACP elections, many of the same allegations swirling about the national organization were heard in the county.Gerald Stansbury, a self-described grass-roots candidate, challenged nine-term director Jean Creek, accusing her of mismanaging and poorly reporting NAACP funds and of becoming too distant and complacent after 18 years in office.
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EXPLORE
December 15, 2011
Students from the Southeast Horizon Council attended the Howard County NAACP Youth Council Community Health Fair Nov. 19, at the Ridgeley Run Community Center, in Jessup. The event targeted the needs of children and teens by providing valuable information on nutrition and exercise. The Horizon Foundation's current initiatives include implementing strategies to improve healthful eating, physical activity and other positive lifestyle changes. Attending the Health Fair to learn more about what is being done locally to improve health and wellness of teens were, from left, Candace Johnson, of Reservoir High School; Betsy Maltez, of Hammond High School; and Marcos Miranda, of Reservoir High School.
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NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | July 15, 1999
NEW YORK -- The Baltimore County branch of the NAACP will not be disbanded but will be taken over by an administrative officer who will set up elections and reorganize branch finances, the organization's national board decided yesterday.The administrator also must report to the national board twice in the next six months about reforms in the branch.No date has been set for elections but Nelson B. Rivers III, director of national field operations for the Baltimore-based National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said they likely will happen "sooner rather than later."
EXPLORE
September 24, 2011
WESTMINSTER - The Carroll County Chapter of the NAACP will be hosting its ninth annual Freedom Fund banquet Oct. 14 at Martin's Caterers of Westminster, 140 West Shopping Center, at 6:30 p.m. A cash bar will precede the dinner at 7 p.m. The guest speaker will be Dr. Miles Harrison Jr. He is a practicing surgeon and co-author of the book, "Ten Bears," recounting the story of the Morgan State College lacrosse team of the 1970s. The emcee for the evening will be Gigi Barnett, a reporter for Baltimore'sWJZ-TV.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1996
A 72-page book could offer a better future for local black-owned businesses.At least that is the hope of county NAACP officials, who announced yesterday a new African-American Business Directory listing 400 businesses owned by blacks in Anne Arundel County.The directory is meant to stimulate economic development by identifying a range of businesses for private contractors and consumers across the county."Nobody knows about these businesses -- we're just trying to help people find them," said Gerald Stansbury, president of the Anne Arundel chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer | May 12, 1992
Members of the national NAACP will hear arguments next week to help decide whether James Pennington, the controversial president of the Baltimore County branch, should be ousted.The challenge to Mr. Pennington's leadership was initiated by Herbert H. Lindsey, a member of the county branch's executive board, who submitted a 35-page report to the national office in March documenting Mr. Pennington's alleged transgressions.In the report, Mr. Lindsey claims that Mr. Pennington's "dictatorial" leadership is weakening the county chapter, making it a "paper tiger."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | November 13, 1998
A longtime member of the Baltimore County NAACP and several of her supporters have accused the chapter's president and its officers of letting their memberships to the national organization expire and sloppy handling of membership dues paid to the local branch.Dr. Bernetha George, a Randallstown physician who lost her bid to unseat Baltimore County NAACP President Patricia Ferguson in an election last night, said records provided by the national office show that seven of the eight officers of the local branch have expired memberships.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
FREDERICK - Like many in town, Charlene Y. Edmonds is dying to know whether public officials are named in the "black book" of an alleged prostitution ring broken up by city police. Hers is more than idle curiosity, though. Edmonds, president of the Frederick County NAACP, says she has been told that local elected officials were on the client list and covered it up. The state prosecutor said this week that he will look into her claims. At first glance, it's an odd cause for an NAACP leader, since no African-Americans are reputed to be involved.
NEWS
April 20, 1996
In Michael Olesker's column Thursday, it was incorrectly stated that the Baltimore County NAACP sought a black person for the position of county school superintendent. In fact, the NAACP opposed the appointment Dr. Anthony Marchione. The column also stated incorrectly that Dr. Bernetha George, vice president of the county NAACP, referred directly to the job specifications of Elfreda W. Massie, the recently named deputy superintendent. She did not.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 4/20/96
NEWS
August 2, 2006
NAACP Youth Council is honored in D.C. Shamara Thornton; Zemen and Tubi Retta; Alexis Carter; Aurielle, Josh, Marcus and Matthew Austin; Dara and Keila Foster; and Cierra Holmes - all members of the Howard County NAACP Youth Council - attended the 97th NAACP National Convention July 15-20 in Washington. The Howard County NAACP Youth Council was named 1st Place NAACP Youth Council of the Year; the council's adviser, Bessie Bordenave, received the 1st Place NAACP Youth Advisor of the Year award.
EXPLORE
June 28, 2011
The Howard County Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People was privileged to honor our Howard County Public School Superintendent June 21. On behalf of Rhonda Jones, education chairwoman of the Maryland NAACP, we presented Sidney Cousin with a plaque which expressed appreciation for his "outstanding vision, dedication and commitment to excellence in education. " Cameron Carter,Youth Council president of the Howard County NAACP, also presented Cousin a plaque, honoring him for his "tireless and steadfast service to the students of Howard County.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to The Sun | December 7, 2008
After a turbulent two years, the county NAACP chapter has a president-elect who members say will energize the organization and start acting on substantive public policy issues. Jacqueline Allsup, 60, of Glen Burnie has been a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People for more than 20 years and is a member of the executive committee of the Anne Arundel County branch. She will replace interim president Alva Sheppard-Johnson, who took office in March to finish out the two-year term of Wayne Jearld.
NEWS
August 2, 2006
NAACP Youth Council is honored in D.C. Shamara Thornton; Zemen and Tubi Retta; Alexis Carter; Aurielle, Josh, Marcus and Matthew Austin; Dara and Keila Foster; and Cierra Holmes - all members of the Howard County NAACP Youth Council - attended the 97th NAACP National Convention July 15-20 in Washington. The Howard County NAACP Youth Council was named 1st Place NAACP Youth Council of the Year; the council's adviser, Bessie Bordenave, received the 1st Place NAACP Youth Advisor of the Year award.
NEWS
By Sarah Schaffer and Sarah Schaffer,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2004
Responding to the recent beating death of a black Pasadena teen and burning of a memorial cross at the spot where he died, the Anne Arundel County branch of the NAACP held a town hall meeting last night to promote "the beginning of healing." "What this is about is bringing the community together," said moderator Carl O. Snowden, an assistant to the county executive and longtime civil rights activist who asked fr prayers for Noah Jamahl Jones, who died July 24 during a brawl between black and white groups outside a house in Pasadena.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2001
FREDERICK - Like many in town, Charlene Y. Edmonds is dying to know whether public officials are named in the "black book" of an alleged prostitution ring broken up by city police. Hers is more than idle curiosity, though. Edmonds, president of the Frederick County NAACP, says she has been told that local elected officials were on the client list and covered it up. The state prosecutor said this week that he will look into her claims. At first glance, it's an odd cause for an NAACP leader, since no African-Americans are reputed to be involved.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2000
Lauded by police departments statewide as an effective crime-fighting tool, the idea of allowing officers to take home their cruisers has been greeted with skepticism by some Baltimore County officials and a go-slow warning from a local NAACP official, who fears it would promote harassment of minorities. Similar programs have been established in every other major suburban Maryland jurisdiction, and they are regarded by many police officials as extensions of community-policing efforts that have helped reduce crime.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | June 9, 1995
Two black organizations will begin a voter registration drive tomorrow aimed at signing up at least 10,000 more Howard County voters during the next five years.The Howard County NAACP and the Columbia chapter of the Delta Sigma Theta sorority will launch the registration campaign at 10 a.m. at Columbia's Wilde Lake Interfaith Center on Trumpeter Road in Columbia."This is a positive step to heighten the awareness of impacting the larger African-American community," said Jenkins Odoms, president of the county's chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
NAACP WANTS MATTER SETTLEDFrom: Elhart E. FlurryJessupPresidentHoward County NAACPThis letter is written in response to the Nov. 18 article concerning the NAACP's involvement with Turf Valley ("Turf Valley Owner Wants Truce with County NAACP," by Michael James).As I have previously indicated, this organization's involvement with the public relations matter at Turf Valley has been voluntary and at the request of Turf Valley management.The caption and the subsequent article (quoting) the Rev. Howard appears to suggest that the NAACP has created and maintained the perception of racial discontent surrounding Turf Valley.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2000
After 22 ballots were challenged in a tight race for president of the Harford County NAACP, Joseph Bond, a former president of the group, edged out incumbent Janice Grant in a contentious battle. The final tally, announced at the civil rights group's Bel Air office last night, was 93 to 73. Grant said last night that she will challenge the results. "You're always surprised if you win," Bond said. "I've been there before." The ballots in question had to be verified before the results could be announced, said Eric Bryant, a national NAACP official who supervised Wednesday's election.
NEWS
By William Lowe and William Lowe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 5, 2000
THE HOWARD County branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People is doing its part to help Ellicott City's African-American children succeed at school. To generate enthusiasm for the new school year among students and parents, the NAACP held a Back-to-School Rally last month at Hilltop Housing Development in Ellicott City. "We have three main goals for students," said Natalie Woodson, the Howard County NAACP education committee chairwoman. "Perfect attendance, good grades and good conduct."
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