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NEWS
January 12, 1993
Baltimore County's legislative delegation has made itself conspicuous during recent General Assembly sessions by vocally opposing budget-balancing measures that might peeve angry voters back home. The predictable upshot of this strategy has been a freeze-out of the county by Gov. William Donald Schaefer and other state leaders.And yet, delegation members express hurt and surprise when they count the slights against the county -- new legislative districts that link parts of the county with Baltimore City, the governor's unwillingness to free up state money for the purchase and preservation of Cromwell Valley land, the lack of major committee chairmanships for county legislators, and so on.But they salve their bruised feelings with the knowledge that their theatrics are like money -- or votes -- in the bank come election time.
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NEWS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
Brian E. Frosh, a veteran state senator from Montgomery County who championed gun control and environmental protection, defeated two opponents to win Tuesday's Democratic primary for Maryland attorney general. Frosh, 67, who had trailed in early polls but was better-funded than his rivals, held a commanding lead over Baltimore County Del. Jon. S. Cardin - the nephew of U.S. Sen. Ben Cardin - and state Del. Aisha N. Braveboy of Prince George's County. After a concession call from Cardin, Frosh addressed supporters at the quaint Women's Club of Chevy Chase.
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NEWS
January 12, 1995
The theme song for the General Assembly that opened yesterday apparently will be "Getting to Know You." Baltimore County's new legislative delegation should be humming the same tune throughout the first session of the 1995-98 term, as county legislators get to know each other, their Annapolis colleagues and the overall scheme of things at the state capital.In a legislature where almost half the members are newcomers, the Baltimore County delegation is hardly bucking the trend. A full two-thirds of the jurisdiction's House of Delegates members are novices, including the first African-Americans elected to a non-federal office from the county.
NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | June 10, 2014
The following was sent to Harford County Council President Billy Boniface. A copy was provided for publication. At the June 04, 2014 regular membership meeting of the New Harford Democratic Club, Bills 14-21 and 14-18 were studied and discussed. By a unanimous vote, we agreed to oppose the passages of both of these ordinances. Bill 14-21 is a seriously misguided and ham-handed attempt to eliminate the rights of citizens and communities to access their elected officials and seek redress on zoning issues.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1996
While Montgomery County legislators are almost uniformly opposed to the state's two proposed NFL stadiums, the county's Chamber of Commerce has come out with a pragmatic -- albeit lukewarm -- endorsement.In a statement distributed yesterday, the chamber said it supports public funding to "assist" construction of the Baltimore and Landover stadiums."The Montgomery County Chamber of Commerce supports the investment of public funds in projects that produce economic returns for the state," the statement said in justifying the group's position.
NEWS
January 18, 1994
During recent General Assembly sessions in Annapolis, Baltimore County legislators have done little to write home about. Indeed, most of the news produced by the delegation in recent years has been negative. When the majority of the county's delegates and senators voted against the budget-balancing tax increases of 1992, one way that assembly bosses punished county lawmakers was to shut them out of leadership posts. In addition, the past year has seen the messy tales of east county delegates John Arnick and Leslie Hutchinson.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | April 13, 2008
This was a strange year in Annapolis for Howard County's legislators and their bills. Republican Del. Warren E. Miller, one of three GOP members in the county's 11-member delegation, had the most success with the passage of three delegation bills and one statewide measure. Meanwhile, county members of the legislature's Democratic majority saw their prime legislation fail. "I'm basking in the glow of legislation. I think the advantage I had this year is I tried to bring those three bills to solve very real problems.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR and BARRY RASCOVAR,Barry Rascovar is deputy editor of the editorial pages of The Sun | November 24, 1991
"All we do is accommodate minorities these days at the cost of everyone else.'' A quotation from David Duke? No. This gem of rabble-rousing babble comes from state Sen. Thomas Bromwell of Baltimore County.The target of his frustration was the decision of a gubernatorial advisory panel on redistricting to force county legislators to recognize that shared General Assembly districts with Baltimore city are inevitable. This is a potentially explosive political grenade incumbents hoped they'd never have to handle.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2004
After two years of wrangling, Howard County's state legislators approved an excise tax on new homes yesterday to raise money for school construction. The vote makes Howard the second Baltimore suburban county to win local legislative approval for tax increases as state school construction money dries up. Despite a lopsided 8-2 vote, the new Howard tax of $1 per square foot on new homes represents a hard-fought compromise, and county officials were uncertain wether it will provide enough revenue to pay for the new high school and three new elementary buildings planned during the next four years.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1991
Lawmakers from Anne Arundel County and the Eastern Shore are unhappy, but the legislature appears to be heading toward settlement of a weeklong standoff over congressional redistricting.The state Senate yesterday passed a new district plan for the state's eight seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.And the House of Delegates, after storming testily out of Annapolis last week, will return Thursday to look for a compromise.The new Senate plan upset lawmakers at both ends of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
It is a rare pleasure in any election year (and perhaps this one more than most) to have a candidate for state-wide office we can endorse so enthusiastically as we do Brian Frosh in the Democratic primary for attorney general. In his career in the General Assembly, he has distinguished himself as a considerate and effective legislator, and we have no doubt that he would excel as Maryland's top lawyer. Mr. Frosh has represented Montgomery County in the state Senate since 1995 and was in the House of Delegates for two terms before that.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2014
State Sen. James N. Robey says there was no grand ambition, no plan to ascend to where he now sits as majority leader of the Maryland Senate, or to have made the unusual leaps from Howard County police chief to county executive to legislator. Things happened, he said, one thing led to another, people egged on a sometimes reluctant candidate. He's 73 now, and a couple of weeks ago, because it was Maryland Day, he put on a black-white-red-and-gold state flag necktie to go with the white shirt and gray suit and stepped out of his overnight accommodations at the Calvert House on State Circle to begin one of his last days of his last legislative session.
NEWS
Liz Bowie | February 7, 2014
A bill to require a partially elected school board in Baltimore County gained overwhelming approval this week from a Senate committee, and will now go to the full Senate for a vote. Whether the eight-year effort by a group of county legislators and parents will have enough support to become law is still in question, but Sen. Bobby Zirkin, a Democrat from Pikesville, is more optimistic that it will pass this year. A hearing for the House bill is scheduled for next week, said Del. John Olszewski Jr., a Dundalk Democrat who chairs the county's House delegation.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
Some community activists in Baltimore County are worried that a proposal to make certain shopping centers' parking lots smaller would lack transparency. Under a bill sponsored by Councilmen John Olszewski Sr.and Kenneth Oliver, owners of shopping centers that are 100,000 square feet or larger could ask the director of the county's Department of Permits, Approvals and Inspections to reduce the number of required parking spaces by up to 40 percent. Community activist Mike Pierce of Kingsville told council members at a meeting Tuesday that requests for parking reductions usually are handled by administrative law judges.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
Baltimore County parents and legislators will ask incoming schools Superintendent Dallas Dance to consider putting more teachers in high schools, where class sizes have swelled since positions were eliminated a year ago. Maryland Sen. James Brochin, a Baltimore County Democrat, said he wants Dance to examine restoring positions at high schools, where hundreds of classes have been dropped, soon after Dance takes over July 1. He said he warned county...
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Former state Sen. Walter M. Baker, who had served in the legislature representing the upper Eastern Shore for more than two decades and also had been a Cecil County attorney, died Tuesday of complications from diabetes at Christiana Hospital in Delaware. The longtime Elkton resident was 84. "Walter was a lifelong Democrat. He was from a large family that was rural and poor, and he grew up with a great sense of values," said Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller. "He was conservative, and loved the Eastern Shore and reflected its conservative values.
NEWS
January 28, 1999
IT WAS apparent even before the legislature reconvened two weeks ago that ideological differences wouldn't bog it down. This 90-day session is unlikely to see much philosophical debate. Anticipating a $240 million surplus, lawmakers are walking around Annapolis saying, "Show me the money!" If Howard County legislators don't come home with a sizable portion, their constituents will be disappointed. But it won't be a new feeling.Last year, Gov. Parris N. Glendening gave the county $13 million in school construction money instead of the $20 million it requested.
NEWS
November 20, 1991
All the political posturing, parochial pettiness, racial and rural gerrymandering and anti-city rhetoric surrounding the drawing of Baltimore County's new General Assembly districts will have to be put aside now that the attorney general's office has interpeted federal law for county lawmakers: There must be a full-fledged minority legislative district carved out of the Liberty Road corridor that crosses the city-county line.This pronouncement changes the entire complexion of redrawing state legislative districts in the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Local governments may escape having to pay a share of burgeoning teacher pension costs next fiscal year, but not for long, according to all but one member of a panel of state legislators who spoke to the Howard County League of Women Voters. If true, that shift in costs could eventually mean higher property taxes for county homeowners, since local governments are just as short of cash as the state is. Some, like Del. Guy Guzzone, are still hoping the economy, and thus revenues, will improve enough in the next few years to prevent the cost shift.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | April 13, 2008
This was a strange year in Annapolis for Howard County's legislators and their bills. Republican Del. Warren E. Miller, one of three GOP members in the county's 11-member delegation, had the most success with the passage of three delegation bills and one statewide measure. Meanwhile, county members of the legislature's Democratic majority saw their prime legislation fail. "I'm basking in the glow of legislation. I think the advantage I had this year is I tried to bring those three bills to solve very real problems.
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