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September 3, 2013
Baltimore County should be wary of changing the chicken law; it should stay the way it is. I refuse to live in a residential area with my next-door neighbor having chickens. If you want chickens and eggs, go buy a farm. Chickens are very dirty and they make so much noise. Our community has such a rat problem now and this will not help by any means. If this law goes into effect, I will leave Maryland. If this law goes into effect, I'll bet there won't be chickens in Dulaney Valley.
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NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 25, 2014
Ready access to clean water for drinking, cooking and bathing is generally regarded as one of the advancements in human history that made civilization possible. In modern times, places with no running water or indoor plumbing are regarded as rustic, if they are vacation destinations, or destitute if they are places people are more interested in getting away from than going to. With this in mind, the measure before the Harford County Council that would reduce to a half acre the amount of land that needs to be on hand for new homes to be built without access to public water and sewer systems has the potential to become a step in the direction of becoming a Third World territory.
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NEWS
By Staff Report | November 3, 1993
Baltimore County's understaffed law office got some reinforcements this week as a new deputy attorney and two staff lawyers were hired.Virginia W. Barnhart, who has been with the Towson office of Miles & Stockbridge for 10 years, will be the new $70,000-a-year deputy county attorney, starting Dec. 6. Michele S. Towson and Constance A. Tucker, the new staff lawyers, already have started work.All three received law degrees from Maryland law schools. A source said the hirings are the result of County Executive Roger B. Hayden's desire to bring more female attorneys into the county law office.
NEWS
September 3, 2013
Baltimore County should be wary of changing the chicken law; it should stay the way it is. I refuse to live in a residential area with my next-door neighbor having chickens. If you want chickens and eggs, go buy a farm. Chickens are very dirty and they make so much noise. Our community has such a rat problem now and this will not help by any means. If this law goes into effect, I will leave Maryland. If this law goes into effect, I'll bet there won't be chickens in Dulaney Valley.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Evening Sun Staff | August 6, 1991
Baltimore County Councilman Douglas Riley had some fun last night with a new law with a serious intent: It aims to crack down on rowdy college students by banning public urination.In no way, said Riley, R-4th, was the law intended to prevent Boy Scouts, or golfers, from heeding nature's call when they are nowhere near a proper toilet.But seriously, folks, Riley's measure carries a possible $100 fine and 30 days in jail for offenders.Until last night, the county had no law banning urinating in zTC public.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
Howard County government must find ways to keep classsize down in its middle schools as well as elementary schools covered by county law, according to people who spoke at a public hearing before the County Council last night. Parents, especially in the Ellicott City area, complained that despite the 1992 Adequate Public Facilities Law, hundreds of new homes can be built around badly crowded schools before the law kicks in. "Educational excellence is in jeopardy," said Debra Plunkett, a PTA president at Ilchester Elementary School.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | August 9, 2006
A federal jury ruled yesterday that Baltimore County officials discriminated against the patients of a Pikesville methadone clinic when they enacted a law prohibiting state-licensed medical facilities from locating within 750 feet of homes. After hearing testimony over three weeks, the U.S. District Court jury deliberated for less than five hours yesterday before finding in favor of A Helping Hand methadone clinic. The clinic, which also prevailed in a judge's ruling that the county law violated the Americans with Disabilities Act, will remain open.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
The county's attempt to cut through the brush and bureaucracy of a state forestation law has led to a painstaking process to make sure the county's version won't be more lenient.The new state law is about as thick as a forest -- 87 pages including the accompanying regulations. It creates several new zoning categories in the process of preserving existing wooded areas as well as developing new ones.Carroll County officials opted to write their own, as the state allows. However, the county law can't be weaker than the state )
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | June 23, 1991
Maryland Reclamation Associates Inc. has sued Harford County and theCounty Council over the "Machiavellian tactics" used to prevent the company from developing an asbestos and rubble dump near Havre de Grace.The company filed suit Thursday in Harford Circuit Court challenging a new county law that the firm says was adopted to disrupt itsefforts to get a state permit for the dump, proposed for a 68-acre site on Gravel Hill Road.H. Edward Andrews III, the County Council's attorney, called Maryland Reclamation's allegations in the suit "offensive and scandalous."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1998
Baltimore County officials are planning a quick revision of the county law regulating political campaign signs in the wake of a federal appeals court judge's opinion Tuesday that the law is probably unconstitutional.A bill changing the county law -- which was challenged in federal court by a supporter of Democratic gubernatorial candidate Eileen M. Rehrmann -- could be introduced at Monday night's County Council meeting, officials say.Officials say that if they quickly change the law, which prohibits campaign signs on private property until 30 days before an election, that could prevent a formal ruling declaring it unconstitutional.
NEWS
May 23, 2013
Nullification fever is spreading across the rural counties along the Mason-Dixon Line, with Cecil, Harford and Carroll counties passing resolutions in the last month declaring their view that Maryland's new gun control law is unconstitutional. Cecil's council kicked off the trend with a resolution stating its intent that no county resources be used to enforce the law. Harford took a more moderate tack, with its councilmen merely urging more study of the constitutionality of the law. But Carroll County on Wednesday took matters to a new level - perhaps no surprise, given the commissioners' previous efforts to disprove global warming.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | November 27, 2012
A conservation group is warning that many of Maryland's counties are skirting a new state law requiring them to rein in development of rural lands. 1000 Friends of Maryland says that more than a third of the state's 23 counties have done little or nothing so far to comply with the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 , which aims to restrict new housing on septic systems in rural areas. "What we have are eight counties that are in the red zone," says Dru Schmidt-Perkins, the Friends executive director.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2012
The Howard County winery tour of the future could conceivably start at Riggs Meadow Drive, then continue south on Route 97, heading down the two-lane road that turns from suburban to rural as you approach Jennings Chapel Road, where you could stop for another taste or two. Someday - maybe. Under the county law enacted last year to allow wineries, one permit has been issued to a man who has been running a winery out of his home in Silver Spring, and the county is considering an application from the co-owner of a popular Columbia restaurant.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
Baltimore County Councilman Todd Huff says he accepted football tickets from a developer that were not reported on his annual financial disclosure form. The county's ethics law does not require elected officials to disclose whether they've accepted sports tickets as gifts, but five of the council's seven members — as well as County Executive Kevin Kamenetz — reported that they had done so last year. The county has continued to allow the practice, despite the fact that the state requires it to be banned.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2011
A developer's plan for a 36-unit waterfront condominium with boat slips that has pitted neighbor against neighbor for years in Bowleys Quarters has been rejected by a Baltimore County hearing officer. In a 45-page opinion based on days of hearings, John E. Beverungen denied the Galloway Creek condominium proposed by Milton A. Rehbein III, who for decades has owned a marina at the site along Burke Road on the Bowleys Quarters peninsula. While Beverungen agreed with some of the developers' arguments, he rejected the project on grounds that it conflicts with the county master plan and neighborhood community plan, and violates a law that specifies where such projects are allowed in Bowleys Quarters.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2011
In a move intended to shore up confidence in government, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz on Wednesday proposed to place public officials' financial disclosure forms online and add teeth to a charter rule that prohibits County Council members from state employment. The proposal, which Kamenetz has asked the County Council to introduce Monday, follows Councilman Kenneth N. Oliver's decision to quit his state job after revelations that it apparently violated the charter.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1999
Baltimore County has abandoned its 20-year-old open meetings law in favor of a state version of the regulations that some observers say allows more business to be conducted in secrecy.By a unanimous vote last night with no debate, the Baltimore County Council agreed to switch to the state law, already used by 21 of Maryland's 23 counties.The county version had a unique feature -- any meeting between the county executive and at least one top staffer was supposed to be advertised.Under the state law, such meetings are exempted from scrutiny.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
Two Howard County massage parlors have filed a federal lawsuit alleging that a county law designed to crack down on massage parlors is unconstitutional and will drive them out of business.The suit is the first legal challenge to the law enacted in 1997 to halt illegal sex activity in the 13 parlors in the county. The outcome of the case could affect a similar law in Anne Arundel.If the law is declared unconstitutional, then "the statute is unenforceable," said F. Todd Taylor, a senior assistant Howard County solicitor.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2011
Volunteer lawyers will provide up to a half-hour of free legal advice for three afternoons this week in the county's law library. People can come into the law library between noon and 5 p.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday to talk with a lawyer about a civil legal issue, said law librarian Joan M. Bellistri. No appointment is required. Advice will not be given on criminal matters. The law library is located on the third floor of the Anne Arundel County Court House on Church Circle, Annapolis.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2011
He owns a .40-caliber pistol, is a member of the National Rifle Association and the rural district he represents as a member of the Anne Arundel County Council is home to scores of hunters. With all that in mind, Councilman Jerry Walker is adamant about amending a recently passed county law in order to exempt licensed secondhand firearms dealers from having to report their acquisitions to Anne Arundel police. The county requirement is duplicative, said Walker, because state law requires gun dealers across Maryland to document all transactions — though the state police are only required to audit the information every three years.
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