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By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | July 23, 1993
A committee that's studying whether Carroll should build a new jail or expand the existing one yesterday discussed the pros and cons of building a jail at the Northern Landfill.The nine-member committee toured the 260-acre site on Route 140 and looked at a five-acre parcel toward the front that likely would be the only spot suitable for a jail.The landfill is within minutes of the courthouse, but it might be costly to hook up utility lines there, said committee member George Hardinger of Silver Run, who is director of capital projects for the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation in Montgomery County.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Baltimore and Harford counties have struck a deal on trash collection they say will benefit taxpayers in both places. Beginning next year, a Baltimore County contractor will take Harford County paper, plastic and other recyclables to a single-stream recycling facility in Cockeysville, which could generate $60,000 a month for Baltimore County. And in 2016, Harford County trash collectors will deliver garbage to Baltimore County's Eastern Sanitary Landfill near White Marsh, where it will then be shipped to an out-of-state landfill.
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | October 7, 1990
After months of contention between county and Annapolis leaders, the County Council this week offered a solution to Annapolis' landfill crisis that city officials say they can live with.In an Oct. 1 letter to Mayor Alfred Hopkins and the City Council, the seven County Council members proposed a privately financed recycling plant to be built on the landfill expansion site, along Route 450.The county would share the facility with Annapolis, and, in turn, the city's non-recyclable trash could be dumped, free of charge, at the county landfill in Millersville.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | May 14, 2008
Joel LaFerriere of Highland estimates that he goes to the county's Alpha Ridge Landfill a couple of times a week, mostly to toss in cardboard and other household debris, he said. Like many people, he likes going to the dump and even finds that the experience can be social. But, until recently, he was discouraged by the long wait to get in on Saturday mornings. "It used to get congested," he said. In fact, the line of cars would sometimes be so long it would spill out onto Marriottsville Road.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 1999
Starting Monday, Howard County highway crews will be collecting storm debris left at curbside along the 900 miles of county roads, and regular yard waste recycling collections for bundled materials will be extended through Feb. 5, County Executive James N. Robey announced yesterday.Residents are asked to place broken branches of up to 4 inches in diameter and other storm-related debris at curbside for pickup by highway crews during a one-time sweep. County officials suggest patience, because it will take time for the trucks to get to every neighborhood.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
The town of Bel Air has filed a lawsuit against Harford County, contending it does not owe nearly $90,000 in "tipping fee" charges and interest for dumping trash at the county landfill.In filing the civil lawsuit yesterday, attorneys for Bel Air cited a 1969 agreement with the county that allowed Bel Air free dumping rights.Under that agreement, the lawsuit contends, Bel Air turned over its 9-acre landfill to the county so that it could build the County Detention Center.In return, Harford guaranteed Bel Air the right to haul trash free for 99 years to the county's Tollgate dump, which closed in 1987.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Sun Staff Writer | November 15, 1994
Whoever dumped carpet, wallpaper, paint cans and a pizza delivery box into an unnamed tributary of Turkeyfoot Run didn't intend to be caught."They even tore the name off the pizza box," said Robert A. King Jr., a county government water resources specialist who spotted the illegally dumped items as he drove along Brick Church Road near Westminster yesterday.Mr. King said what he found yesterday is part of a pattern: More trash has been ending up in Carroll streams since higher fees went into effect July 1 at the county landfill.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
The Carroll commissioners are considering charging county residents and business owners for the disposal of large loads of yard waste at the county landfill, a service the county provides for free. The equipment for grinding down yard waste - leaves, grass, tree limbs and mulch - has been worn down by large loads, and the charge might help mitigate the county's cost of updating the machines, said Gary L. Horst, Carroll's director of enterprise and recreation services. Horst said charging $15 for every ton above the first 1,000 pounds would raise an extra $60,000 in revenue, based on last year's statistics.
NEWS
April 28, 1993
The public can learn more about a county proposal to increase the cost of trash disposal to residents and businesses by up to 45 percent during two informational meetings.The meetings are set for 7 p.m. tomorrow and Monday. Officials from the county Department of Utilities will answer questions about the need for a $40 increase in the annual charge for curbside pickup and a $5 increase in the tipping fee charged to commercial haulers for every ton of refuse they deposit at a county landfill.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | April 5, 1992
Harford County plans to buy 24 undeveloped lots in the Forest Greenssubdivision near Perryman because the land, where methane and lead recently have been detected, was once a county dump site.JeffersonBlomquist, deputy county attorney, said the former dump was discovered in November 1990 when Mallard Landing Joint Venture, a developer, began preparing ground for home construction."The subdivision was approved to actually be built on a landfill,but it wasn't discovered until the contractor installing utilities and roads started digging up trash," said Blomquist.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,sun reporter | November 12, 2006
After eight years of research, state and federal reviews, monitoring and testing and several public hearings, Maryland environmental officials are on the brink of allowing Harford County to move ahead with a $3 million expansion at its only municipal landfill. The Harford Waste Disposal Center, a 60-acre facility in Whiteford, is expected to run out of space by the end of 2008, officials said. Before making its final decision, the Maryland Department of the Environment has scheduled another public hearing at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Dublin Elementary School in Street, near the landfill site.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | November 25, 2002
Nina Griffin's 14 enormous oaks drop enough leaves to fill 30 bags a week this time of year, too many to put out for the trash man, too many to let decay on the grass, just too, too many. But now people come to her home just outside Glenelg and cart her bags away for free -- and they're just as pleased to have her leaves as she is to be rid of them. Similar symbiotic relationships are playing out all across Howard County's tree-dotted neighborhoods: Every year, volunteers pair homeowners eager to cast off trees' cast-offs with gardeners who prize leaves as an ingredient for rich soil.
NEWS
July 30, 2002
County staff members will answer questions and receive comments on Carroll's "Ten Year Solid Waste Management Plan" at 2 p.m. tomorrow. The session precedes a public hearing on the plan at 2 p.m. Aug. 7 in Room 300A of the County Office Building. The county is seeking residents' comments on the plan that governs its landfills and recycling efforts. The county staff session will be held in Room 003-004, Carroll County Office Building, 225 N. Center St., Westminster. Anyone wishing to file written comments for the public hearing record may do so before, or at, the public hearing.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2002
The Carroll commissioners are considering charging county residents and business owners for the disposal of large loads of yard waste at the county landfill, a service the county provides for free. The equipment for grinding down yard waste - leaves, grass, tree limbs and mulch - has been worn down by large loads, and the charge might help mitigate the county's cost of updating the machines, said Gary L. Horst, Carroll's director of enterprise and recreation services. Horst said charging $15 for every ton above the first 1,000 pounds would raise an extra $60,000 in revenue, based on last year's statistics.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2001
When Wylene Burch deposits her family's garbage outside her Howard County home each week, she barely gives it a second thought. "I thought it goes to the [Howard County] landfill," Burch said. "I'm so glad they do pick it up!" But, truth be told, virtually none of the trash collected from Howard's tidy suburban streets is headed for a local landfill or incinerator. Instead, the pickup is the first step in a 100-mile journey to a remote corner of eastern Virginia. Each night around midnight, about 325 tons of Howard's garbage is sent south from an Annapolis Junction transfer station across the Potomac River on a special train - tightly sealed in custom-built hopper cars - to a 630-acre landfill opened in 1996 by King George County, Va., and operated by a huge national company called Waste Management Inc. Howard is not alone.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Piles of dead sheep and goats have been dumped in a rural area of Carroll County four times in the past six weeks, prompting an investigation that includes police, road crews, agricultural and animal agencies. About 35 animals have been removed from the Marston area in southwest Carroll near the Frederick County line, said Jay R. Nave, administrative supervisor of the county Bureau of Roads Operations. About evenly divided between sheep and goats, many were so decomposed that it was difficult to determine the numbers, much less a cause of death.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1994
For several weeks, Eastern Waste Industries has been taking advantage of the county's indecision on yard waste by offering to collect grass, shrubs, leaves and prunings for individual municipalities.The company has approached at least two towns about collecting and transporting yard waste to the county landfill for a flat fee and the purchase of fluorescent stickers to identify each bag of vegetation.The county commissioners are still trying to decide how to handle yard waste and whether and how much to charge to process it at the county landfill.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2001
Piles of dead sheep and goats have been dumped in a rural area of Carroll County four times in the past six weeks, prompting an investigation that includes police, road crews, agricultural and animal agencies. About 35 animals have been removed from the Marston area in southwest Carroll near the Frederick County line, said Jay R. Nave, administrative supervisor of the county Bureau of Roads Operations. About evenly divided between sheep and goats, many were so decomposed that it was difficult to determine the numbers, much less a cause of death.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 21, 1999
Starting Monday, Howard County highway crews will be collecting storm debris left at curbside along the 900 miles of county roads, and regular yard waste recycling collections for bundled materials will be extended through Feb. 5, County Executive James N. Robey announced yesterday.Residents are asked to place broken branches of up to 4 inches in diameter and other storm-related debris at curbside for pickup by highway crews during a one-time sweep. County officials suggest patience, because it will take time for the trucks to get to every neighborhood.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 30, 1998
Basic money-handling shortcomings have exposed several Anne Arundel County government departments to embezzlement and costly errors, the county auditor says.Audits repeatedly recommend that departments handling payments from the public divide money-taking and record-keeping duties among several employees to provide a systems of checks and balances.But sloppy bookkeeping often goes unchanged until an obvious problem surfaces."You are creating an opportunity for one person to take money and cover it up," county auditor Teresa Sutherland said.
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