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By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2012
When he evaluated his retirement options five years ago, Assistant State's Attorney Fred Paone settled on a deal to collect his pension while working as a part-time prosecutor. Now, Anne Arundel County has sent Paone a $115,672.50 bill demanding that he repay retirement benefits and a notice that his future pension checks will be cut as long as he works for the county. An internal audit had revealed that Paone, 61, and three other workers at the Anne Arundel state's attorney's office were illegally collecting full pension payments while working part time.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
R. Alonzo "Lonz" Childress, a civil engineer whose career with the Baltimore County Department of Public Works spanned more than 40 years, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from an infection. The Taneytown resident was 72. "Lonz was one of the most pragmatic and even-keeled persons that you'd ever meet. He was good at getting to the bottom of problems," said Brian L. Childress, a nephew who is a civil engineer with D.S. Thaler & Associates. "He always maintained a steady course and never got worked up. He could solve engineering problems without ever getting out of sync," said Mr. Childress, who lives in Perry Hall.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman apologized to county employees Thursday morning after 10 of them received emails to their government accounts asking for donations to her campaign. In an email sent to all county employees, Neuman said some employees "may have inadvertently" received the campaign emails. "Your name may have been identified through a database of previous campaign volunteers or donors. If you received this email, I sincerely apologize," Neuman wrote. "It is no secret that I am running for office, but I do not want any of our employees to feel compelled in any way to support or endorse my campaign," Neuman wrote in her email Thursday.
NEWS
April 26, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz is again displaying his arrogance ( "Judge orders Kamenetz to appear in court in police union dispute," April 22). This time, its not toward just the county citizens and county employees but toward the courts. It would be refreshing to see the judge throw the arrogant, pompous ass in the pokey. Even more enjoyable, and fair to the county citizens, would be for the judge to order the interest and penalties that are now being compounded to be paid by Mr. Kamenetz and his two stooge underlings who are also wasting taxpayer money to show how arrogant they are!
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff writer | January 20, 1991
In this winter of budgetary discontent, Carroll officials have been looking for any way to save money.But one method the state is using -- longer workweeks for state workers -- apparently is not a consideration for the county's 823 employees."
NEWS
December 11, 2003
Anne Arundel County Executive Janet S. Owens announced yesterday that county employees will receive an additional holiday this year - Friday, Dec. 26. "In appreciation of your dedication and professionalism ... I hope that you will enjoy the time with your families and friends this holiday season," she wrote in a message to employees. Some county workers, whose jobs require them to work Dec. 26, will be credited with compensatory time. Last week, Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. announced that state workers will also receive the day off.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | November 20, 1991
The county's latest round of budget cuts will "cut deeply into the pockets of county employees" but will have minimal effect on the public, County Executive Charles I. Ecker said yesterday.Most noticeable to the public will be the switch to one-day-a-week trash collection in April -- a move expected to save $200,000 the remainder of this fiscal year and $800,000 the next. Trash is now collected twice a week.Few services will be reduced as a result of an unpaid five-day furlough for all employees including himself, Ecker said, because threeof the furlough days would come on holidays -- Dec. 25, Jan. 1 and Jan. 15 -- when county government would be shut down anyway, except for essential services.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | July 28, 1993
Carroll County workers will get another chance to fill 16 spaces in the day care center their employer provides, before the county opens the slots to other parents.County commissioners voted yesterday to send a letter to all department heads to alert employees that the center has 16 vacancies.If any more county employees want to enroll their children in the center, they must sign up by mid-August. After that point, any vacancies will be offered to employees at the Carroll County Health Department, Carroll County Public Library and the Agricultural Center.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1996
Anne Arundel County employees, who will not receive a raise for the third consecutive year, are earning less than they did 10 years ago.But not by much.Excluding schoolteachers, county employees have received raises averaging 3.3 percent over the last 10 years. Inflation, meanwhile, has driven up the cost of living an average of 3.4 percent each year. That means Anne Arundel workers have failed to keep pace with rising prices."It's something that has to be examined," said Councilman William C. Mulford II, an Annapolis Republican.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
County Executive Robert R. Neall is offering the county's 4,000 employees a 2 percent pay raise, their first increase in 2 1/2 years, as part of a package being negotiated this week that includes modified health insurance coverage.The pay increase will cover only six months, taking effect Jan. 1 and running until the end of the fiscal year on June 30. It is expected to cost the county $4.5 million, $1.8 million for general county employees and $2.7 million for school system workers, bTC said Louise Hayman, a spokeswoman for Mr. Neall.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
Harford County presented the Green Star for the second quarter to Ron Davis, of Harford County Government's Department of Public Works, Division of Environmental Services. When an office has various locations, employees often face challenges when scheduling meetings. The Division of Environmental Services faces this challenge with locations at the Harford Waste Disposal Center Scale House in Street and the Waste to Energy Scale House in Joppa. Davis, of Environmental Services, proposed a way to increase meeting participation and decrease travel costs.
NEWS
February 21, 2014
Your recent expose and editorial on violence in the Baltimore City public schools is proof positive that someone in the school system is hiding the dirt and intimidating teachers and other staff ( "Curbing classroom violence," Feb. 17). And that's only the tip of the iceberg. When I read the article I thought I was reading about Baltimore County's public schools. Your reporters have been made aware of the same misconduct among administrators and staff in that school system, but you have chosen to ignore the fact that county bus drivers, attendants and students are all experiencing the same atrocities you reported in the city school system.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 4, 2014
A citizens' commission has given Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman a long to-do list for improving county government. After meeting for eight months, the 45-member Commission on Excellence recommended Tuesday a suite of changes ranging from updating software to providing customer service training to zoning inspectors. Neuman announced the recommendations on Tuesday at an event in Glen Burnie, then held a Twitter chat to discuss the report. "We don't want to create a report and put it on a shelf," Neuman said.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman apologized to county employees Thursday morning after 10 of them received emails to their government accounts asking for donations to her campaign. In an email sent to all county employees, Neuman said some employees "may have inadvertently" received the campaign emails. "Your name may have been identified through a database of previous campaign volunteers or donors. If you received this email, I sincerely apologize," Neuman wrote. "It is no secret that I am running for office, but I do not want any of our employees to feel compelled in any way to support or endorse my campaign," Neuman wrote in her email Thursday.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
Former Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold will have the appeal of his misconduct convictions heard by the Maryland Court of Special Appeals on Feb. 5. Leopold, a Republican, was convicted in January of two counts of misconduct in office related to directing county employees to carry out personal tasks. He resigned from office, served 30 days in jail and performed community service. He was replaced as county executive by Laura Neuman. Leopold is seeking to have his convictions overturned, arguing the charge of misconduct is vague and that his actions didn't amount to criminal behavior.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | December 16, 2013
Harford County Department of Community Services - Office on Aging employee Janet Wright has been named the Harford County Employee of the Month for December. Wright is the senior health insurance programs coordinator. Wright is always eager to handle insurance issues for seniors and people of all ages with Medicare and Medicaid. Her skills do not end with office work. She has also worked with the Department of Community Services to put together an insurance slide show that is used on the county web site.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Dennis O'Brien and Elise Armacost and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writers Monica Norton contributed to this story | May 1, 1992
Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall unveiled a $634 million spending plan today that he says does what he was elected to do -- slash the size of government.But Mr. Neall's plan carries a price -- the jobs of 88 county workers.A variety of employees, from file clerks to the county archaeologist to the county undersheriff, would be out of work July 1, when their positions are abolished.County employees in departments targeted for layoffs said last night they had yet to be notified of the terminations.
NEWS
By Keith Paul and Keith Paul,Staff writer | November 20, 1991
County employees don't like the idea of a five-day furlough, but many said yesterday that it's better than having no job."It's probably like a prisoner on death row -- we all got a reprieve," said VickiTaylor, who works in the finance department. "Now, it's up to (Gov. William Donald) Schaefer" to decide if the budget will be cut more.Taylor's reaction came in response to County Executive Charles I.Ecker's announcement yesterday that the county's 1,650 full-time employees will be furloughed for five days to help make up for a budget shortfall.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Anne Arundel County Public Schools are closed Tuesday due to the inclement weather. Also closed are Annapolis Area Christian School and Anne Arundel Community College. At the college, officials posted on the website that final exams that were scheduled for Dec. 10 will now be held Tuesday, Dec. 17 at the same time and location. Anne Arundel County government offices opened at 10 a.m., with liberal leave in effect for county employees. Emergency personnel were asked to report at regularly scheduled times.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
Anne Arundel County government officials say the days of delays are gone for employees opening and responding to email messages. More than 6,000 county government email addresses were switched this month from an old system called GroupWise to a Google-based system. The old system was slow and problematic, county officials say. It was shut down for a weekend in June so information technology workers could fix problems after employees endured a week of receiving delayed messages - or no messages at all. "It was definitely on its last legs," said Rick Durkee, the county's chief information officer.
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