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NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith Jr. nominated Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos yesterday for a seat on the Revenue Authority board, igniting another confirmation battle with County Council members who say Smith violated a gentleman's agreement. Smith wants to expand the role of the Revenue Authority, which oversees golf courses and parking lots and garages, said his spokesman, Damian O'Doherty. Though he offered no specifics, O'Doherty said that Angelos, who also is one of the state's leading plaintiff's attorneys, would be instrumental in carrying out such a vision.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
The Baltimore County Council could see big changes in the coming elections as most members face stiff primary challenges and a council veteran is stepping down. Campaign signs are popping up all over the county and literature is arriving in mailboxes as candidates approach the June 24 primary. Four of the council's seven members - Democrats Cathy Bevins, Ken Oliver and Vicki Almond and Republican Todd Huff - are in spirited primary battles. And Dundalk's John Olszewski Sr. is retiring from the council, triggering a scramble among five Democrats for the party nomination.
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NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | March 9, 1995
Howard County Council members said for the record yesterday what many people have suspected for some time: The county will not raise taxes next year.As a consequence, a prolonged, abrasive confrontation between the school board and the council over the fiscal 1996 budget appears inevitable.County Executive Charles I. Ecker is expected to slash requests from all departments, including the Board of Education, rather than propose a tax increase when he sends his proposed budget to the council next month.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2014
A Baltimore County councilman who is running for re-election says someone broke into his Twitter account and posted a lewd photo early Thursday morning. Councilman Todd Huff offered his "sincere apologies" for the image, which he said an unknown person had posted at 2:59 a.m. Thursday by sabotaging his account. "My campaign staff and I take this very seriously," the Lutherville Republican wrote in a message on his campaign's Facebook page. "The person in the picture is clearly not me, nor is it anyone I know.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | December 13, 1993
The county government is quietly phasing out curbside pickup of bulk trash, such as sofas and air conditioners -- a move that has drawn fire from County Council members and neighborhood leaders."
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | March 6, 1991
Three County Council members were charged by their colleagues yesterday with "political grandstanding" after announcing support for limits on vacation time for legislative employees.The three council members -- Diane R. Evans, R-Arnold, Carl G. "Dutch" Holland, R-Pasadena and George Bachman, D-Linthicum -- unexpectedly released a letter at Monday night's council meeting supporting a limit on the amount of vacation time legislative branch employees can accumulate.They want to follow County Executive Robert R. Neall's new policyfor executive branch employees, which prohibits accumulation of morethan 35 vacation days, plus leave accrued during the year in which aworker leaves county government.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | July 23, 2001
Day after day for weeks on end, Whitney Dudley rose before dawn, leashed her two dogs, walked to Burkshire Road and recorded the same thing: red Nissan, white Toyota, gold Saturn, black Nissan. Dudley and her husband, Brad, live east of Towson University, a school with 16,000 students but on-campus housing for fewer than 4,000, and she and her neighbors have been fighting for years to stop landlords from renting houses to more people than the law allows. County zoning regulations say that no more than two unrelated renters can live in a building in a single-family zone.
NEWS
August 18, 1991
Two Republican legislators, Delegates Martin G. Madden and John S. Morgan, have drafted a bill that would require county developers seeking rezoning of property to disclose political contributions they havemade to County Council members deciding the zoning cases.Q: Do you agree with their proposal?CO: WHAT'S YOUR OPINION?
NEWS
By Larry Carson | December 2, 2007
Automatic 2.9 percent pay increases for Howard County Executive Ken Ulman and the five County Council members take effect this week, the anniversary of their swearing-in on Dec. 4 last year. Ulman's salary increases from $147,000 to $151,263, while the County Council members' salaries rise from $49,000 to $50,421. The pay levels change annually based on the federal consumer price index, according to legislation adopted by the last County Council in February last year. By comparison, county police officers received a 5 percent pay raise in this fiscal year, firefighters 6 percent and teachers 5 percent.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
A proposal to allow Baltimore County Council members to work as state employees was not faring well last night. With just more than half of precincts counted, about 54 percent of the votes were against the proposed charter amendment. Voters approved the other nine referendum questions authorizing the county to borrow $255 million for a variety of purposes, including $105.2 million for school construction projects.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
It was bad enough that the Baltimore County Council created bad policy and bad precedent when it blocked construction of new affordable housing in the Rosedale community this week. What was worse was how it was done, in such transparently bad faith. This decision wasn't the result of a rational discussion about how to meet the housing needs of the county's growing population of low-income residents. Rather it was the raw expression of a universal cry among fearful homeowners: "Not in my back yard!"
EXPLORE
June 20, 2011
County Councilman David Marks on Monday announced the formation of the 5th District Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee, designed to provide input on pedestrian and bicycle issues in Towson, Loch Raven, Parkville andPerry Hall. Earlier this year, the County Council passed legislation sponsored by Marks and Councilman Tom Quirk of the 1st District (Catonsville) that created a Baltimore County Pedestrian and Bicycle Advisory Committee. The law allowed each council member to form a version of the committee in his or her district.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2010
The Peace of Sunshine store off the main drag in Catonsville has lately been making more than half its weekly sales in K2, a "legal pot" known also as "spice. " But owner Lawrence J. Zwick says he has sold his last bag. As soon as he heard Monday morning that Baltimore County might make it a crime to sell the smokable leaf, he says, he packed up his inventory of two boxes and shipped it back to the distributor. "Oh, I'm going to miss it," said Zwick, a 44-year-old retired Coast Guard warrant officer who for four years has owned the the store specializing in T-shirts, jewelry, incense and hookahs.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | September 6, 2009
The Wilde Lake Village Center is the prime guinea pig for change after the Howard County Council voted this week for a new zoning process to redevelop Columbia's aging village centers, but no one knows what the result will be. The planned town's oldest retail center stands half-empty now, since a small Giant supermarket closed three years ago followed by Produce Galore and several other tenants. But Kimco Realty, the center's owner along with five others, no longer has a firm idea for what to do with it. Kimco Vice President Geoffrey Glazer made it clear after Tuesday night's County Council vote that this time he will be coming to the residents for a discussion, not presenting them with a plan.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Nicole Fuller and Gadi Dechter and Nicole Fuller,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | May 27, 2009
An almost even mix of more than 200 advocates and opponents of a measure that would allow slots at Arundel Mills mall voiced their opinions Tuesday night before the Anne Arundel County Council at the last public hearing before the council votes on the bill next week. Proponents of slots urged the council to approve the zoning bill, saying slots would bring jobs and increased revenues that would benefit the county's public schools, while opponents pointed to possible increases in traffic and crime as reasons to abandon the proposal.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,nick.madigan@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
The burgeoning arena of cybercrime is reordering the priorities of law enforcement agencies, and they are going to need money to fight it, Baltimore County Police Chief James W. Johnson says. Johnson, speaking at a budget workshop meeting Monday convened by County Council members, said that in just a few years, most if not all crimes will have some Internet- or computer-based component, and that police agencies had better be prepared. "We have just begun recently to collect DNA at the point of arrest," Johnson said, as an example of a databank that might be subject to cyber-incursions, or hacking, by people who want to change stored information.
NEWS
By Diane Mullaly from the files of the Howard County Historical Society's library | September 1, 1996
25 years ago (week of August 29-Sept. 4, 1971):A survey made by delegates Hugh Burgess and J. Hugh Nichols showed that a majority of registered voters in Howard County were in favor of: election of County Council members by district, rather than at large; an elected, rather than appointed, school board, and a constitutional amendment that would allow a state lottery. The survey respondents were opposed to: removal of the ceiling on the local piggyback tax and state takeover of elementary and secondary schools.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1994
Gov. William Donald Schaefer vetoed a county bill yesterday that would have required developers applying for zoning changes to disclose political contributions to County Council members.Howard state legislators, who have pushed the legislation for the past four years, denounced the veto, charging that the governor appears to be protecting "special interests" and is out of touch with the desires of Howard residents."I'm sure it was politically motivated. Some of the special interests in the county got to him," said Del. John S. Morgan, R-13B, one of the sponsors of the Howard County ethics bill.
NEWS
November 5, 2008
A proposal to allow Baltimore County Council members to work as state employees was not faring well last night. With just more than half of precincts counted, about 54 percent of the votes were against the proposed charter amendment. Voters approved the other nine referendum questions authorizing the county to borrow $255 million for a variety of purposes, including $105.2 million for school construction projects.
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